Search results for 'Consumption' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Iris Vermeir & Wim Verbeke (2006). Sustainable Food Consumption: Exploring the Consumer “Attitude – Behavioral Intention” Gap. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 19 (2):169-194.score: 24.0
    Although public interest in sustainability increases and consumer attitudes are mainly positive, behavioral patterns are not univocally consistent with attitudes. This study investigates the presumed gap between favorable attitude towards sustainable behavior and behavioral intention to purchase sustainable food products. The impact of involvement, perceived availability, certainty, perceived consumer effectiveness (PCE), values, and social norms on consumers’ attitudes and intentions towards sustainable food products is analyzed. The empirical research builds on a survey with a sample of 456 young consumers, using (...)
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  2. Caroline Josephine Doran (2009). The Role of Personal Values in Fair Trade Consumption. Journal of Business Ethics 84 (4):549 - 563.score: 24.0
    Research in the U. S. on fair trade consumption is sparse. Therefore, little is known as to what motivates U. S. consumers to buy fair trade products. This study sought to determine which values are salient to American fair trade consumption. The data were gathered via a Web-based version of the Schwartz Value Survey (SVS) and were gleaned from actual consumers who purchase fair trade products from a range of Internet-based fair trade retailers. This study established that indeed (...)
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  3. Anders Nordgren (2012). Ethical Issues in Mitigation of Climate Change: The Option of Reduced Meat Production and Consumption. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (4):563-584.score: 24.0
    In this paper I discuss ethical issues related to mitigation of climate change. In particular, I focus on mitigation of climate change to the extent this change is caused by livestock production. I support the view—on which many different ethical approaches converge—that the present generation has a moral obligation to mitigate climate change for the benefit of future generations and that developed countries should take the lead in the process. Moreover, I argue that since livestock production is an important contributing (...)
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  4. Veronika A. Andorfer & Ulf Liebe (2012). Research on Fair Trade Consumption—A Review. Journal of Business Ethics 106 (4):415-435.score: 24.0
    An overview and assessment of the current state of research on individual consumption of Fair Trade (FT) products is given on the basis of 51 journal publications. Arranging this field of ethical consumption research according to key research objectives, theoretical approaches, methods, and study population, the review suggests that most studies apply social psychological approaches focusing mainly on consumer attitudes. Fewer studies draw on economic approaches focusing on consumers’ willingness to pay ethical premia for FT products or sociological (...)
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  5. Kieran Bonner (2009). A Dialogical Exploration of the Grey Zone of Health and Illness: Medical Science, Anthropology, and Plato on Alcohol Consumption. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (2):81-103.score: 24.0
    This paper takes a phenomenological hermeneutic orientation to explicate and explore the notion of the grey zone of health and illness and seeks to develop the concept through an examination of the case of alcohol consumption. The grey zone is an interpretive area referring to the irremediable zone of ambiguity that haunts even the most apparently resolute discourse. This idea points to an ontological indeterminacy, in the face of which decisions have to be made with regard to the health (...)
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  6. Johan de Tavernier (2012). Food Citizenship: Is There a Duty for Responsible Consumption? [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):895-907.score: 24.0
    Labeling of food consumption is related to food safety, food quality, environmental, safety, and social concerns. Future politics of food will be based on a redefinition of commodity food consumption as an expression of citizenship. “Citizen-consumers” realize that they could use their buying power in order to develop a new terrain of social agency and political action. It takes for granted kinds of moral selfhood in which human responsibility is bound into human agency based on knowledge and recognition. (...)
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  7. Erik de Bakker & Hans Dagevos (2012). Reducing Meat Consumption in Today's Consumer Society: Questioning the Citizen-Consumer Gap. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):877-894.score: 24.0
    Abstract Our growing demand for meat and dairy food products is unsustainable. It is hard to imagine that this global issue can be solved solely by more efficient technologies. Lowering our meat consumption seems inescapable. Yet, the question is whether modern consumers can be considered as reliable allies to achieve this shift in meat consumption pattern. Is there not a yawning gap between our responsible intentions as citizens and our hedonic desires as consumers? We will argue that consumers (...)
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  8. Eleni Papaoikonomou, Mireia Valverde & Gerard Ryan (2012). Articulating the Meanings of Collective Experiences of Ethical Consumption. Journal of Business Ethics 110 (1):15-32.score: 24.0
    In the context of the growing popularity of the ethical consumer movement and the appearance of different types of ethical collective communities, the current article explores the meanings drawn from the participation in Responsible Consumption Cooperatives. In existing research, the overriding focus has been on examining individual ethical consumer behaviour at the expense of advancing our understanding of how ethical consumers behave collectively. Hence, this article examines the meanings derived from participating in ethical consumer groups. A qualitative multi-method approach (...)
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  9. Caroline Josephine Doran (2010). Fair Trade Consumption: In Support of the Out-Group. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 95 (4):527 - 541.score: 24.0
    Two sets of self-transcendence values -universalism and benevolence - act as a source of motivation for the promotion of the welfare of the other rather than the self This article sought to determine the exact nature of the interaction between these sets of values and the consumption of fair trade products. In an earlier study, universalism values were found to have a significant influence on fair trade consumption whereas benevolence values did not, despite their shared goal and values (...)
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  10. Johan Tavernier (2012). Food Citizenship: Is There a Duty for Responsible Consumption? [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 25 (6):895-907.score: 24.0
    Labeling of food consumption is related to food safety, food quality, environmental, safety, and social concerns. Future politics of food will be based on a redefinition of commodity food consumption as an expression of citizenship. “Citizen-consumers” realize that they could use their buying power in order to develop a new terrain of social agency and political action. It takes for granted kinds of moral selfhood in which human responsibility is bound into human agency based on knowledge and recognition. (...)
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  11. Jeffery Bray, Nick Johns & David Kilburn (2011). An Exploratory Study Into the Factors Impeding Ethical Consumption. Journal of Business Ethics 98 (4):597 - 608.score: 24.0
    Although consumers are increasingly engaged with ethical factors when forming opinions about products and making purchase decisions, recent studies have highlighted significant differences between consumers' intentions to consume ethically, and their actual purchase behaviour. This article contributes to an understanding of this 'Ethical Purchasing Gap' through a review of existing literature, and the inductive analysis of focus group discussions. A model is suggested which includes exogenous variables such as moral maturity and age which have been well covered in the literature, (...)
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  12. Michael A. Long & Douglas L. Murray (2013). Ethical Consumption, Values Convergence/Divergence and Community Development. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (2):351-375.score: 24.0
    Ethical consumption is on the rise, however little is known about the degree and the implications of the sometime conflicting sets of values held by the broad category of consumers who report consuming ethically. This paper explores convergence and divergence of ethical consumption values through a study of organic, fair trade, and local food consumers in Colorado. Using survey and focus group results, we first examine demographic and attitudinal correlates of ethical consumption. We then report evidence that (...)
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  13. Henrik Lerner, Bo Algers, Stefan Gunnarsson & Anders Nordgren (2013). Stakeholders on Meat Production, Meat Consumption and Mitigation of Climate Change: Sweden as a Case. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (3):663-678.score: 24.0
    In this paper we analyse and discuss the views of Swedish stakeholders on how to mitigate climate change to the extent it is caused by meat production. The stakeholders include meat producer organisations, governmental agencies with direct influence on meat production, political parties as well as non-governmental organisations. Representatives of twelve organisations were interviewed. Several organisations argued against the mitigation option of reducing beef production despite the higher greenhouse gas intensity of beef compared to pork and chicken meat (according to (...)
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  14. Roberta Sebastiani, Francesca Montagnini & Daniele Dalli (2013). Ethical Consumption and New Business Models in the Food Industry. Evidence From the Eataly Case. Journal of Business Ethics 114 (3):473-488.score: 24.0
    Individual and collective ethical stances regarding ethical consumption and related outcomes are usually seen as both a form of concern about extant market offerings and as opportunities to develop new offerings. In this sense, demand and supply are traditionally portrayed as interacting dialectically on the basis of extant business models. In general, this perspective implicitly assumes the juxtaposition of demand side ethical stances and supply side corporate initiatives. The Eataly story describes, however, a different approach to market transformation; in (...)
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  15. Samuel Michael Natale (2011). Ἐμπάθεια (Empatheia) and Caritas: The Role of Religion in Fair Trade Consumption. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 98 (1):1 - 15.score: 24.0
    There is much still to learn about the nature of fair trade consumers. In light of the Pope's encyclical Caritas in Ventate, this article sought to advance the current understanding by investigating the role of religion in fair trade consumption. In this study, fair trade consumers and non-consumers across many religions as well as the nonreligious described their consumption of fair trade products as well as the use of their religious beliefs in their purchase behavior. It appears that (...)
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  16. Dorothy Blair & Jeffery Sobal (2006). Luxus Consumption: Wasting Food Resources Through Overeating. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (1):63-74.score: 24.0
    In this paper, we redefine the term luxus consumption to mean food waste and overconsumption leading to storage of body fat, health problems, and excess resource utilization. We develop estimates of the prevalence of luxus consumption and its environmental consequences using US food supply, agricultural, and environmental data and using procedures modeled after energetics analysis and ecological footprint analysis. Between 1983 and 2000, US food availability (food consumption including waste) increased by 18% or 600 kcal (2.51 MJ) (...)
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  17. Frederick H. Buttel (2000). The Recombinant BGH Controversy in the United States: Toward a New Consumption Politics of Food? [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 17 (1):5-20.score: 24.0
    The history of the controversy overrecombinant bovine growth hormone (rBGH) is exploredin terms of the issue of the potential robustness ofa consumption-driven ``new'' politics of food andagriculture. It is noted that while the dominanthistorical traditions in the social sciences haveserved to discount the autonomous role that consumersand consumption play in modern societies, there hasbeen growing interest in consumption within foodstudies as well as other bodies of scholarship such aspostmodernism, social constructivism, socialcapital/social distinction, and environmentalsociology. A review of (...)
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  18. Diana Cotrau (2010). Malls And The Holy Trinity of Teens: Pleasure, Leisure, and Consumption in Transylvania. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 7 (21):3-19.score: 24.0
    Malls have become social magnets for people of all social strata, young included, and, in this guise, they apparently emulate churches in their function of ritually congregating people at weekends or on Sundays. In the following we shall endeavour to read the city malls (in Transylvania) from a Cultural Studies perspective with the goal of showing that they function as cultural loci for youth congregation, as well as powerful agencies of identity construction. We aim to prove that through their ritual (...)
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  19. Barbara Culiberg & Domen Bajde (2013). Do You Need a Receipt? Exploring Consumer Participation in Consumption Tax Evasion as an Ethical Dilemma. Journal of Business Ethics:1-12.score: 24.0
    The paper focuses on the consumer side of consumption tax evasion (CTE), a subcategory of the shadow economy. The ethical dimensions of tax evasion have been effectively captured by the existent literature on tax morale, yet it fails to address the role consumers can play in CTE. Further, there is a shortage of tax morale studies that explore ethical decision making as a process composed of multiple steps and determinants. To bridge these gaps, we turned to the consumer ethics (...)
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  20. Lieske Voget-Kleschin (forthcoming). Reasoning Claims for More Sustainable Food Consumption: A Capabilities Perspective. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-23.score: 24.0
    This paper examines how employing the capabilities approach in conceptualizing sustainable development allows reasoning and specifying claims for more sustainable lifestyles. In doing so, it focuses on the example of food consumption because it constitutes an ‘(un)sustainability hotspot’ as well as a paradigmatic example for the tensions between individual lifestyles on the one hand and societal consequences of such lifestyles on the other. The arguments developed in the paper allow rebutting two common objections against claims for individual changes in (...)
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  21. Marian Petcu (2014). The Church as a Prescriptor of Consumption - An Outline for a Sociology of Luxury. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 13 (38):172-194.score: 24.0
    The present research is a historical perspective on luxury during 1781-1933. The major stake is represented by the response of the ecclesiastical authority to luxury, the rejection/blaming/damning of luxury; subsequently the acceptance of it. We notice here the church's incapacity to stop the 'illegitim' consumption, that kind of consumption which was beyond the possibilities of a common person, and the taxation of luxury - the one who had more than he/she needed had to donate to the Church, meaning (...)
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  22. Ronald Paul Hill (2008). Disadvantaged Consumers: An Ethical Approach to Consumption by the Poor. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):77 - 83.score: 21.0
    This essay presents my research stream on impoverished citizens as it relates to transdisciplinary work at the intersection of consumer behavior, applied ethics, public policy, and marketing practice. The original studies that inform this discussion were conducted using ethnographic methods with subpopulations that included the homeless, rural poor, children living in poverty, and aborigines isolated in the Australian outback. The opening section frames my work within the context of the larger marketing domain. The next section describes dysfunctional business activities that (...)
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  23. Luigi Cembalo, Giuseppina Migliore & Giorgio Schifani (2013). Sustainability and New Models of Consumption: The Solidarity Purchasing Groups in Sicily. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (1):281-303.score: 21.0
    European society, with its steadily increasing welfare levels, is not only concerned with food (safety, prices), but also with other aspects such as biodiversity loss, landscape degradation, and pollution of water, soil, and atmosphere. To a great extent these concerns can be translated into a larger concept named sustainable development, which can be defined as a normative concept by). Sustainability in the food chain means creating a new sustainable agro-food system while taking the institutional element into account. While different concepts (...)
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  24. Rob Irvine (2013). Food Ethics: Issues of Consumption and Production. [REVIEW] Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (2):145-148.score: 21.0
  25. Yannick Rumpala (2011). “Sustainable Consumption” as a New Phase in a Governmentalization of Consumption. Theory and Society 40 (6):669-699.score: 21.0
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  26. R. H. Cheney (1936). Reaction Time Behavior After Caffeine and Coffee Consumption. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (3):357.score: 21.0
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  27. Alison Hope Alkon (2008). From Value to Values: Sustainable Consumption at Farmers Markets. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (4):487-498.score: 21.0
    Advocates of environmental sustainability and social justice increasingly pursue their goals through the promotion of so-called “green” products such as locally grown organic produce. While many scholars support this strategy, others criticize it harshly, arguing that environmental degradation and social injustice are inherent results of capitalism and that positive social change must be achieved through collective action. This study draws upon 18 months of ethnographic fieldwork at two farmers markets located in demographically different parts of the San Francisco Bay Area (...)
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  28. Martin Verner, Martin J. Herrmann, Stefan J. Troche, Claudia M. Roebers & Thomas H. Rammsayer (2013). Cortical Oxygen Consumption in Mental Arithmetic as a Function of Task Difficulty: A Near-Infrared Spectroscopy Approach. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 21.0
  29. Melinda Papp (2012). Conspicuous Consumption in Postwar Japan: The Case of a Rite of Passage. Human Affairs 22 (2):196-213.score: 21.0
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  30. Oddveig Storstad & Hilde Bjørkhaug (2003). Foundations of Production and Consumption of Organic Food in Norway: Common Attitudes Among Farmers and Consumers? [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 20 (2):151-163.score: 21.0
    In Norway, the production andconsumption of organic food is still small-scale. Research on attitudes towards organic farming in Norway has shown that most consumers find conventionally produced food to be “good enough.” The level of industrialization of agriculture and the existence of food scandals in a country will affect consumer demand for organically produced foods. Norway is an interesting case because of its small-scale agriculture, few problems with food-borne diseases, and low market share for organic food. Similarities between groups of (...)
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  31. Scott Vrecko (2010). Global and Everyday Matters of Consumption: On the Productive Assemblage of Pharmaceuticals and Obesity. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 39 (5):555-573.score: 21.0
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  32. Maciej Bazela (2008). Sustainable Consumption: A Philosophical and Moral Approach. Ateneo Pontificio Regina Apostolorum.score: 21.0
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  33. Marta A. Ślimak, Jessica L. Ables, Silke Frahm, Beatriz Antolin-Fontes, Julio Santos-Torres, Milena Moretti, Cecilia Gotti & Inés Ibañez-Tallon (2014). Habenular Expression of Rare Missense Variants of the Β4 Nicotinic Receptor Subunit Alters Nicotine Consumption. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 21.0
  34. Noreen D. Mdege, Duncan Raistrick & Graham Johnson (2014). Medical Specialists' Views on the Impact of Reducing Alcohol Consumption on Prognosis of, and Risk of, Hospital Admission Due to Specific Medical Conditions: Results From a Delphi Survey. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 20 (1):100-110.score: 21.0
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  35. Daniel Miller (1987). Material Culture and Mass Consumption. B. Blackwell.score: 21.0
     
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  36. Colin Campbell (1995). Conspicuous Confusion? A Critique of Veblen's Theory of Conspicuous Consumption. Sociological Theory 13 (1):37-47.score: 18.0
    Veblen's concept of conspicuous consumption, although widely known and commonly invoked, has rarely been examined critically; the associated "theory" has never been tested. It is suggested that the reason for this lies in the difficulty of determining the criterion that defines the phenomenon, a difficulty that derives from Veblen's failure to integrate two contrasting conceptual formulations. These are, first, an interpretive or subjective version that conceives of conspicuous consumption as action marked by the presence of certain intentions, purposes, (...)
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  37. Hsiang‐Ke Chao (2007). A Structure of the Consumption Function. Journal of Economic Methodology 14 (2):227-248.score: 18.0
    It is claimed in the structural realism in philosophy of science that scientists aim to preserve the true structure, represented by the equations in their models. We reinterpret structural realism as a doctrine involving representation. Proving the existence of a representation theorem secures the problem of lacking independent criteria for identification between structure and non?structure. This paper argues that a similar realist view of structure can be found in the theory of consumption in which the Fisherian framework of intertemporal (...)
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  38. Cheng Lu Wang & Xiaohua Lin (2009). Migration of Chinese Consumption Values: Traditions, Modernization, and Cultural Renaissance. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (3):399 - 409.score: 18.0
    Most observers of the Chinese consumer market have seen its linear evolution from a traditional culture toward a more Westernized consumer society during the country's three-decade experimentation of the free market. Recent development, however, shows a cultural renaissance in China wherein Chinese people have increasingly demanded their traditional culture components to be part of their consumption experience, coinciding with China's re-emergence as a country of economic and political power. We identify this shift, explore its causes, and discuss its managerial (...)
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  39. Magdalena Öberseder, Bodo B. Schlegelmilch & Verena Gruber (2011). “Why Don't Consumers Care About CSR?”: A Qualitative Study Exploring the Role of CSR in Consumption Decisions. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 104 (4):449-460.score: 18.0
    There is an unresolved paradox concerning the role of corporate social responsibility (CSR) in consumer behavior. On the one hand, consumers demand more and more CSR information from corporations. On the other hand, research indicates a considerable gap between consumers’ apparent interest in CSR and the limited role of CSR in purchase behavior. This article attempts to shed light on this paradox by drawing on qualitative data from in-depth interviews. The findings show that the evaluation of CSR initiatives is a (...)
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  40. Richard Bowe, Stephen Ball & Sharon Gewirtz (1994). 'Parental Choice', Consumption and Social Theory: The Operation of Micro-Markets in Education. British Journal of Educational Studies 42 (1):38 - 52.score: 18.0
    Using key writings in the sociology of consumption and consumerism and analyses of the nature of postmodern society, this paper considers how parents decide upon a secondary school and the nature of their engagement with the education market.
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  41. Rogene A. Buchholz (1998). The Ethics of Consumption Activities: A Future Paradigm? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (8):871 - 882.score: 18.0
    Concern about the environment and sustainable growth has raised questions related to resource availability and limits regarding the ability of the planet to provide everyone with an improved material standard of living. Such concerns lead to charges that the industrialized world, particularly the United states, is living beyond its means and taking more than its share of resources to produce a life style that is not sustainable. Whether overconsumption is a legitimate problem and changing patterns of consumption are necessary (...)
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  42. Robert Meister (1996). Beyond Satisfaction: Desire, Consumption, and the Future of Socialism. Topoi 15 (2):189-210.score: 18.0
    Anti-capitalist thinkers in the West have long argued that the expansion of markets creates new wants faster than it can satisfy them, and that consumption under capitalism is a form of addictive behavior. Recently, however, the relentless expansion of desire has come to be seen as a strength rather than a weakness of capitalist regimes. To understand this change socialists must consider whether there is a point to consumer spending that goes beyond satisfaction with what one gets. Freud's notion (...)
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  43. Noah Quastel (2008). Ethical Consumption, Consumer Self-Governance, and the Later Foucault. Dialogue 47 (01):25-.score: 18.0
    ABSTRACT: This article analyzes the later work of Michel Foucault on ethics, freedom, and self-governance as it applies to the ethics of consumption and to new ethical consumerist movements such as fair-trade coffee. Foucault's emphasis on practices of the self helps elucidate the virtue ethics involved in consumption choices. Ethical consumption is cast as a set of practices of self-development: through critical activity and the quest for freedom, persons seek to transform themselves to live in reciprocal relationships (...)
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  44. Jan Deckers (2011). Justice, Negative GHIs, and the Consumption of Farmed Animal Products. Journal of Global Ethics 7 (2):205 - 216.score: 18.0
    In a previous work, I argued that all human beings should possess the right to adequate health protection and that we have good reasons to believe that not all human beings are or will be able to enjoy this right. I introduced the ?Global Health Impact? or ?GHI? concept as a unit of measurement to evaluate the effects of human actions on the health of human and nonhuman organisms and argued that the negative GHIs produced by our current generation jeopardise (...)
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  45. Kirsty Best (2004). Interfacing the Environment: Networked Screens and the Ethics of Visual Consumption. Ethics and the Environment 9 (2):65-85.score: 18.0
    : The screen continues to be the primary generator of visual imagery in contemporary culture, including of the natural world. This paper examines the screen as visual interface in the construction and consumption of physical environments. Screens are increasingly incorporated in our daily habits and imbricated into our lives, especially as mediating technologies are embedded into the surfaces of our physical surroundings, shaping and molding our interactions with and perceptions of those environments. As screens become increasingly portable and digitized, (...)
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  46. Jan Deckers (2010). What Policy Should Be Adopted to Curtail the Negative Global Health Impacts Associated with the Consumption of Farmed Animal Products? [REVIEW] Res Publica 16 (1):57-72.score: 18.0
    The negative global health impacts (GHIs) associated with the consumption of farmed animal products are wide-ranging and morally significant. This paper considers four options that policy-makers might adopt to curtail the negative GHIs associated with the consumption of farmed animal products. These options are: 1. to introduce a ban on the consumption of farmed animal products; 2. to increase the costs of farmed animal products; 3. to educate people about the negative GHIs associated with the consumption (...)
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  47. Jan Deckers (2013). Obesity, Public Health, and the Consumption of Animal Products. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (1):29-38.score: 18.0
    Partly in response to rising rates of obesity, many governments have published healthy eating advice. Focusing on health advice related to the consumption of animal products (APs), I argue that the individualistic paradigm that prevails must be replaced by a radically new approach that emphasizes the duty of all human beings to restrict their negative “Global Health Impacts” (GHIs). If they take human rights seriously, many governments from nations with relatively large negative GHIs—including the Australian example provided here—must develop (...)
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  48. Cameron Owens (2005). An Integral Approach to Sustainable Consumption and Waste Reduction. World Futures 61 (1 & 2):96 – 109.score: 18.0
    This article aims to demonstrate how the Integral approach can be utilized to understand and potentially resolve a particular human-ecological issue. It arises out of a research project that involved examining the factors inhibiting sustainable consumption and waste reduction in the community of Calgary. The Integral approach aims to ensure that no fundamental dimensions of the problem are neglected. It beckons us to consider body, mind, and spirit in the personal, cultural, and social realms of reality.
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  49. Melissa A. Orlie (2002). The Desire for Freedom and the Consumption of Politics. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (4):395-417.score: 18.0
    In this essay I argue that commodity consumption is to the regime of political capitalism at the turn of this century what Michel Foucault claimed for discourses of sexuality in the bio-political state. If I am right, then understanding contemporary subjectivities requires granting greater political credence to practices of commodity consumption than they generally receive and a correlative paradigm shift in our notion of desire - from discourses of sexuality to erotics of appetite. But whatever 'ethical substance' we (...)
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  50. Helena Röcklinsberg (forthcoming). Fish Consumption: Choices in the Intersection of Public Concern, Fish Welfare, Food Security, Human Health and Climate Change. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics:1-19.score: 18.0
    Future global food insecurity due to growing population as well as changing consumption demands and population growth is sometimes suggested to be met by increase in aquaculture production. This raises a range of ethical issues, seldom discussed together: fish welfare, food security, human health, climate change and environment, and public concern and legislation, which could preferably be seen as pieces in a puzzle, accepting their interdependency. A balanced decision in favour of or against aquaculture needs to take at least (...)
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