Search results for 'Continuity History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  9
    Klaus Petrus (1996). Naturgemässe Klassifikation Und Kontinuität Wissenschaft Und GeschichteNatural Classification and Continuity, Science and History. Some Reflections on Pierre Duhem. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 27 (2):307-323.
    Duhem is commonly held to have founded his view of history of science as continuous on the ‘metaphsical assertion’ of natural classification. With the help of a strict distinction between formal and material characterization of natural classification I try to show that this imputation is problematic, if not simply incorrect. My analysis opens alternative perspectives on Duhem's talk of continuity, the ideal form of theories, and the rôle of ‘bon sens’; moreover it emphasizes some aspects of Duhem's realism (...)
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  2. Jaroslav Pelikan (1986). The Mystery of Continuity: Time and History, Memory and Eternity in the Thought of Saint Augustine. University Press of Virginia.
  3.  2
    Mike Huggins & Peter Knight (1997). Curriculum Continuity and Transfer From Primary to Secondary School: The Case of History. Educational Studies 23 (3):333-348.
    The transfer of children from primary school to secondary school has long been seen as a problematic area. The National Curriculum was depicted as offering a solution to some of the transfer problems by providing for curriculum continuity across the primary-secondary divide. This paper reports the results of a study of curriculum continuity in one subject, history, now that a National Curriculum has been in place for several years. It reports that teachers continue to see problems with (...)
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  4.  22
    Heiner Roetz (2010). Huang, Chun-Chieh, Konfuzianismus: Kontinuität Und Entwicklung: Studien Zur Chinesischen Geistesgeschichte (Confucianism: Continuity and Development: Studies in Chinese Intellectual History), Edited and Translated by Stephan Schmidt. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (4):477-480.
    Huang, Chun-chieh, Konfuzianismus: Kontinuität und Entwicklung: Studien zur chinesischen Geistesgeschichte (Confucianism: Continuity and Development: Studies in Chinese Intellectual History), Edited and translated by Stephan Schmidt Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11712-010-9191-0 Authors Heiner Roetz, Faculty of East Asian Studies, Ruhr University, 44780 Bochum, Germany Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009 Journal Volume Volume 9 Journal Issue Volume 9, Number 4.
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  5.  16
    Fredrik Bragesjö, Aant Elzinga & Dick Kasperowski (2012). Continuity or Discontinuity? Scientific Governance in the Pre-History of the 1977 Law of Higher Education and Research in Sweden. Minerva 50 (1):65-96.
    The objective of this paper is to balance two major conceptual tendencies in science policy studies, continuity and discontinuity theory. While the latter argue for fundamental and distinct changes in science policy in the late 20th century, continuity theorists show how changes do occur but not as abrupt and fundamental as discontinuity theorists suggests. As a point of departure, we will elaborate a typology of scientific governance developed by Hagendijk and Irwin ( 2006 ) and apply it to (...)
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  6.  31
    Francis Oakley (2005). Natural Law, Laws of Nature, Natural Rights: Continuity and Discontinuity in the History of Ideas. Continuum.
    Metaphysical schemata and intellectual traditions -- Laws of nature : the scientific concept -- Natural law : disputed moments of transition -- Natural rights : origins and grounding.
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  7. Roger Ariew & Peter Barker (1991). Revolution and Continuity Essays in the History and Philosophy of Early Modern Science.
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  8. Ton Van Helvoort (1994). History of Virus Research in the Twentieth Century: The Problem of Conceptual Continuity. History of Science 32 (96):185-235.
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  9.  48
    Louis Mackey (1988). The Mystery of Continuity. Time and History, Memory and Eternity in the Thought of Saint Augustine. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Philosophy 26 (3):476-478.
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  10.  1
    Bruce Moran (1993). Revolution and Continuity: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Early Modern Science by Peter Barker; Roger Ariew. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 84:372-373.
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  11. Joseph Agassi (1973). Continuity and Discontinuity in the History of Science. Journal of the History of Ideas 34 (4):609.
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  12. F. M. Barnard (1963). Herder's Treatment of Causation and Continuity in History. Journal of the History of Ideas 24 (2):197.
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  13. John M. Burney (1993). History, Despotism, Public Opinion and the Continuity of the Radical Attack on Monarchy in the French Revolution, 1787–1792. History of European Ideas 17 (2-3):245-263.
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  14. Hélio Rebello Cardoso (2016). Peirce and Foucault on Time and History: The Tasks of Continuity. History and Theory 55 (1):25-38.
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  15.  7
    Helen A. Maniati (2005). The Educational Utilization of Elements of the History of Natural Sciences (19th Century): Highlighting the Cognitive Continuity with Antiquity. Science and Education 14 (7-8):713-720.
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  16.  24
    Alexander A. Jascalevich (1924). The Idea of Continuity in the History of Psychology I. Journal of Philosophy 21 (24):645-663.
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  17.  34
    T. H. Irwin (2011). Continuity in the History of Autonomy. Inquiry 54 (5):442 - 459.
    Abstract Six apparent features of Kant's conception of autonomy appear to differentiate it sharply from anything that we can find in an Aristotelian conception of will and practical reason. (1) Autonomy requires a role for practical reason independent of its instrumental role in relation to non-rational desires. (2) This role belongs to the rational will. (3) This role consists in the rational will's being guided by its own law. (4) This guidance by the law of the will itself requires acts (...)
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  18. Roger Ariew & Peter Barker (1992). Duhem and Continuity in the History of Science. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 46 (182):323-343.
     
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  19. Steven C. Hayes (1987). FACING THE CONTINUITY ASSUMPTION: A Review of Gavagai! Or the Future History of the Animal Language Controversy, by David Premack. MIT Press: Cambridge, MA. 1986. Behaviorism 15 (2):167-170.
     
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  20.  6
    Hans-Georg Gadamer (1972). The Continuity of History and the Existential Moment. Philosophy Today 16 (3):230-240.
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  21.  4
    Mal Hooper (2003). The History of Science in Non-Western Traditions. Paul Hager is Professor of Education at the University of Technology, Sydney. He Gained His Ph. D. In Philosophy From the University of Sydney in 1986. His Varied Research and Writing Interests Include Critical Thinking, Informal Learning at Work, and Bertrand Russell's Philosophy. He is the Author of Continuity And. [REVIEW] Science and Education 12:339-340.
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  22.  2
    Beatrice Forbes Manz (1991). Ann KS Lambton, Continuity and Change in Medieval Persia: Aspects of Administrative, Economic and Social History, Eleventh—Fourteenth Century.(Columbia Lectures on Iranian Studies, 2.) Np: Bibliotheca Persica, 1988. Pp. Xiii, 425; 8 Tables, 5 Maps. $49.50 (Cloth); $19.50 (Paper). Distributed by State University of New York Press, State University Plaza, Albany, NY 12246. [REVIEW] Speculum 66 (2):436-437.
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  23.  1
    Robert Brentano (2000). Debra J. Birch, Pilgrimage to Rome in the Middle Ages: Continuity and Change.(Studies in the History of Medieval Religion, 13.) Woodbridge, Suff., and Rochester, NY: Boydell and Brewer, 1998. Pp. X, 238; 3 Maps. $63. [REVIEW] Speculum 75 (2):442-442.
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  24.  1
    G. Tsetskhladze (1997). Review. Continuity and Change: Proceedings of the Last Achaemenid History Workshop, April6-8 1990, Ann Arbor, Michigan. H Sancisi-Weerdenburg, A Kuhrt, M Cool Root. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 47 (1):104-105.
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  25. Patricia Hincks (2009). National History Curriculum: Continuity and Change. Agora 44 (4):29.
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  26. Alexander Kazhdan & Anthony Cutler (1982). Continuity and Discontinuity in Bizantine History. Byzantion 52 (460):463-64.
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  27. S. Vegas Gonzalez (2004). The Question of Continuity in the History of Philosophy From the Thought of Richard Rorty and Elenctic Socratic Philosophy. Pensamiento 60 (228):337-359.
     
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  28.  11
    Norman Kretzmann (ed.) (1982). Infinity and Continuity in Ancient and Medieval Thought. Cornell University Press.
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  29.  88
    Serge Grigoriev (2008). Continuity of the Rational: Naturalism and Historical Understanding in Collingwood. Journal of the Philosophy of History 2 (2):119-137.
    It is sometimes suggested that Collingwood's philosophy of history is decidedly anti-naturalist and argues for a complete separation between history and the natural sciences. The purpose of this paper is to examine this suggestion and to argue that Collingwood's conception of the relationship between history and natural sciences is much more subtle and nuanced than such a view would allow for. In fact, there is little in Collingwood to offend contemporary naturalistic sensibilities reasonably construed. The impression that (...)
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  30.  97
    Lorenz Krüger, Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.) (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Walter DeGruyter.
    What are the relationships between philosophy and the history of philosophy, the history of science and the philosophy of science? This selection of essays by Lorenz Krüger (1932-1994) presents exemplary studies on the philosophy of John Locke and Immanuel Kant, on the history of physics and on the scope and limitations of scientific explanation, and a realistic understanding of science and truth. In his treatment of leading currents in 20th century philosophy, Krüger presents new and original arguments (...)
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  31.  6
    Jason Blakely (2013). How Charles Taylor Philosophizes with History: A Review of Dilemmas and Connections. [REVIEW] Journal of the Philosophy of History 7 (2):231-243.
    Charles Taylor’s latest collection of essays, Dilemmas and Connections, is the most recent installment in his development of a grand history of the rise of a modern, secular age. In this review, I show how the historical narrative that defines Taylor’s late work is in continuity with his earlier hermeneutic commitments, while also allowing him to advance new inquiries into areas as diverse as secularism, religion, nationalism, and human rights discourse. I do this by not only providing (...)
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  32.  11
    Klaus Petrus (1996). Naturgemässe Klassifikation Und Kontinuität Wissenschaft Und Geschichte. Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 27 (2):307 - 323.
    Natural classification and continuity, science and history. Some Reflections on Pierre Duhem. Duhem is commonly held to have founded his view of history of science as continuous on the 'metaphysical assertion' of natural classification. With the help of a strict distinction between formal and material characterization of natural classification I try to show that this imputation is problematic, if not simply incorrect. My analysis opens alternative perspectives on Duhem's talk of continuity, the ideal form of theories, (...)
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  33.  4
    Gabriel Motzkin (2012). Are We Hard‐Wired to Think About History? History and Theory 51 (1):107-115.
    ABSTRACTThis book assumes that basic ways of thinking about history are hard‐wired in the brain. Since different styles of discourse with which we talk about the past are hardwired, Blum infers that a protohistorical consciousness is necessary for the existence of language. Historical logics reflect some preconceived part–whole relation. Blum discerns four kinds of part‐whole structure, which he terms continuity, quantum, continuum, and dialectic. Blum believes that these part–whole relations rest on universal, prereflective intuitions. He concludes that humans (...)
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  34.  2
    Herman Paul (2011). Performing History: How Historical Scholarship is Shaped by Epistemic Virtues. History and Theory 50 (1):1-19.
    Philosophers of history in the past few decades have been predominantly interested in issues of explanation and narrative discourse. Consequently, they have focused consistently and almost exclusively on the historian’s output, thereby ignoring that historical scholarship is a practice of reading, thinking, discussing, and writing, in which successful performance requires active cultivation of certain skills, attitudes, and virtues. This paper, then, suggests a new agenda for philosophy of history. Inspired by a “performative turn” in the history and (...)
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  35. Henry Osborn Taylor (1939). A Historian's Creed. Cambridge, Harvard University Press.
    Continuity and survival.--Continuities in history.--The chosen self.--Soul of Archilochus.--Placing the middle ages.
     
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  36.  96
    Richard Sorabji (1983/2006). Time, Creation, and the Continuum: Theories in Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages. University of Chicago Press.
    Richard Sorabji here takes time as his central theme, exploring fundamental questions about its nature: Is it real or an aspect of consciousness? Did it begin along with the universe? Can anything escape from it? Does it come in atomic chunks? In addressing these and myriad other issues, Sorabji engages in an illuminating discussion of early thought about time, ranging from Plato and Aristotle to Islamic, Christian, and Jewish medieval thinkers. Sorabji argues that the thought of these often negelected philosophers (...)
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  37.  19
    Kelly A. Parker (1998). The Continuity of Peirce's Thought. Vanderbilt University Press.
    A comprehensive and systematic reconstruction of the philosophy of Charles S. Peirce, perhaps America's most far-ranging and original philosopher, which reveals the unity of his complex and influential body of thought. We are still in the early stages of understanding the thought of C. S. Peirce (1839-1914). Although much good work has been done in isolated areas, relatively little considers the Peircean system as a whole. Peirce made it his life's work to construct a scientifically sophisticated and logically rigorous philosophical (...)
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  38.  3
    Jacques Le Goff (1992). History and Memory. Columbia University Press.
    In this brillant meditation on conceptions of history, Le Goff traces the evolution of the historian's craft. Examining real and imagined oppositions between past and present, ancient and modern, oral and written history, _History and Memory_ reveals the strands of continuity that have characterized historiography from ancient Mesopotamia to modern Europe.
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  39. J. E. Hare (2007). God and Morality: A Philosophical History. Blackwell Pub..
    God and Morality evaluates the ethical theories of four principle philosophers, Aristotle, Duns Scotus, Kant, and R.M. Hare. Uses their thinking as the basis for telling the story of the history and development of ethical thought more broadly Focuses specifically on their writings on virtue, will, duty, and consequence Concentrates on the theistic beliefs to highlight continuity of philosophical thought.
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  40.  63
    Paul M. Livingston (2002). Experience and Structure: Philosophical History and the Problem of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (3):15-33.
    Investigation and analysis of the history of the concepts employed in contemporary philosophy of mind could significantly change the contemporary debate about the explainability of consciousness. Philosophical investigation of the history of the concept of qualia and the concept of scientific explanation most often presupposed in contemporary discussions of consciousness reveals the origin of both concepts in some of the most interesting philosophical debates of the twentieth century. In particular, a historical investigation of the inheritance of concepts of (...)
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  41.  3
    Majid Fakhry (1983). A History of Islamic Philosophy. Longman.
    The first comprehensive survey of Islamic philosophy from the seventh century to the present, this classic discusses Islamic thought and its effect on the cultural aspects of Muslim life. Fakhry shows how Islamic philosophy has followed from the earliest times a distinctive line of development, which gives it the unity and continuity that are the marks of the great intellectual movements of history.
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  42.  17
    Raymond Corbey & Wil Roebroeks (eds.) (2001). Studying Human Origins: Disciplinary History and Epistemology. Amsterdam University Press.
    This history of human origin studies covers a wide range of disciplines. This important new study analyses a number of key episodes from palaeolithic archaeology, palaeoanthropology, primatology and evolutionary theory in terms of various ideas on how one should go about such reconstructions and what, if any, the uses of such historiographical exercises can be for current research in these disciplines. Their carefully argued point is that studying the history of palaeoanthropological thinking about the past can enhance the (...)
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  43.  5
    P. J. Corfield (2007). Time and the Shape of History. Yale University Press.
    This ambitious book explores the relationship between time and history and shows how an appreciation of long-term time helps to make sense of the past. The book is devoted to a wide-ranging analysis of the way different societies have conceived and interpreted time, and it develops a theory of the threefold roles of continuity, gradual change, and revolution which together form a "braided" history. Linking the interpretative chapters are intriguing brief expositions on time travel, time cycles, time (...)
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  44. Christopher Dawson (2002). Dynamics of World History. Isi Books.
    Machine generated contents note: PART ONE: TOWARD A SOCIOLOGY OF HISTORY -- SECTION I: THE SOCIOLOGICAL -- FOUNDATIONS OF HISTORY -- I. The Sources of Culture Change -- 2. Sociology as a Science -- 3. Sociology and the Theory of Progress -- 4. Civilization and Morals -- 5. Progress and Decay in Ancient and Modern Civilization -- 6. Art and Society -- 7. Vitality or Standardization in Culture -- 8. Cultural Polarity and Religious Schism -- 9. Prevision in (...)
     
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  45. Gerald Alan Press (1974). The Development of the Idea of History in Antiquity. Dissertation, University of California, San Diego
    An extensive scholarly literature, written in the past century holds that in ancient Greek and Roman thought history is understood as circular and repetitive - a consequence of their anti-temporal metaphysics - in contrast with Judaeo-Christian thought, which sees history as linear and unique - a consequence of their messianic and hence radically temporal theology. Gerald Press presents a more general view - that the Graeco-Roman and Judaeo-Christian cultures were fundamentally alien and opposed cultural forces and that, therefore, (...)
     
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  46.  3
    Fred Weinstein (1990). History and Theory After the Fall: An Essay on Interpretation. University of Chicago Press.
    In this ambitious work, Fred Weinstein confronts the obstacles that have increasingly frustrated our attempts to explain social and historical reality. Traditionally, we have relied on history and social theory to describe the ways people understand the world they live in. But the ordering explanations we have always used--derived from the classical social theories originally forged by Marx, Tocqueville, Weber, Durkheim, Freud--have collapsed. In the wake of this collapse or "fall," the rival claims of fiction, psychoanalysis, sociology, anthropology, and (...)
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  47.  19
    Maureen A. O'Malley (2010). The First Eukaryote Cell: An Unfinished History of Contestation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 41 (3):212-224.
    The eukaryote cell is one of the most radical innovations in the history of life, and the circumstances of its emergence are still deeply contested. This paper will outline the recent history of attempts to reveal these origins, with special attention to the argumentative strategies used to support claims about the first eukaryote cell. I will focus on two general models of eukaryogenesis: the phagotrophy model and the syntrophy model. As their labels indicate, they are based on claims (...)
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  48.  15
    Roger Smith (2005). The History of Psychological Categories. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 36 (1):55-94.
    Psychological terms, such as ‘mind’, ‘memory’, ‘emotion’ and indeed ‘psychology’ itself, have a history. This history, I argue, supports the view that basic psychological categories refer to historical and social entities, and not to ‘natural kinds’. The case is argued through a wide ranging review of the historiography of western psychology, first, in connection with the field’s extreme modern diversity; second, in relation to the possible antecedents of the field in the early modern period; and lastly, through a (...)
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  49.  3
    William A. Green (1995). Periodizing World History. History and Theory 34 (2):99-111.
    Periodization is rooted in historical theory. It reflects our priorities, our values, and our understanding of the forces of continuity and change. Yet periodization is also subject to practical constraints. For pedagogical reasons, world historians must seek reasonable symmetry between major historical eras despite huge discrepancies in the availability of historical data for separate time periods and for different areas of the world.Political issues arise in periodization. Should world history provide integrated treatment of the evolution of civilization, focusing (...)
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  50.  3
    Jörn Rüsen (2004). How to Overcome Ethnocentrism: Approaches to a Culture of Recognition by History in the Twenty‐First Century1. History and Theory 43 (4):118-129.
    Much international and intercultural discourse about historiography is influenced by a way of historical thinking deeply rooted in human historical consciousness and that works throughout all cultures and in all times: ethnocentrism. Ethnocentric history conceives of identity in terms of “master-narratives” that define togetherness and difference as essential for identity in a way that causes tension and struggle. These narratives conceive of history in terms of “clashes of civilizations,” and they reinforce the idea that international and intercultural relations (...)
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