Search results for 'Contracts' (try it on Scholar)

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Bibliography: Contracts in Philosophy of Law
  1.  56
    Thomas W. Dunfee (2006). A Critical Perspective of Integrative Social Contracts Theory: Recurring Criticisms and Next Generation Research Topics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):303 - 328.
    During the past ten years Integrative Social Contracts Theory (ISCT) has become part of the repertoire of specialized decision-oriented theories in the business ethics literature. The intention here is to (1)␣provide a brief overview of the structure and strengths of ISCT; (2) identify recurring themes in the extensive commentary on the theory including brief mention of how ISCT has been applied outside the business ethics literature; (3) describe where research appears to be headed; and (4) specify challenges faced by (...)
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  2.  50
    Mark Douglas (2000). Integrative Social Contracts Theory: Hype Over Hypernorms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 26 (2):101 - 110.
    Applying social contract theory to business ethics is a relatively new idea, and perhaps nobody has pursued this direction better than Thomas Donaldson and Thomas W. Dunfee. Their "Integrative Social Contracts Theory" manages to combine culturally sensitive decision making capacities with trans-cultural norms by setting up a layered system of social contracts. Lurking behind their work is a concern with the problems of relativism. They hope to alleviate these problems by introducing three concepts important to the ISCT: "authentic (...)
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  3.  19
    Dirk Ulrich Gilbert & Michael Behnam (2009). Advancing Integrative Social Contracts Theory: A Habermasian Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):215 - 234.
    We critically assess integrative social contracts theory (ISCT) and show that the concept particularly lacks of moral justification of substantive hypernorms. By drawing on Habermasian philosophy, in particular discourse ethics and its recent application in the theory of deliberative democracy , we further advance ISCT and show that social contracting in business ethics requires a well-justified procedural rather than a substantive focus for managing stakeholder relations. We also replace the monological concept of hypothetical thought experiments in ISCT by a (...)
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  4.  7
    Olaf Karitzki & Alexander Brink (2003). How Can We Act Morally in a Merger Process? A Stimulation Based on Implicit Contracts. Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):137 - 152.
    The intention of the article is to offer stakeholders affected by mergers a criterion from which moral arguments may be generated for the organization of each individual case. The criterion: "Any operation causing legitimate interests to suffer vital infringement should be avoided in a merger process." A vital infringement of these interests is assumed when the merger undermines unique positive opportunities or considerable impairment in the future, impossible to overcome for the person affected without an unacceptable level of (...). Therefore, we mainly concentrate on implicit contracts – which should be based on the principle pacta sunt servanda as well. These contracts are mandatory to run an economy that produces increasingly more knowledge-based goods. (shrink)
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  5.  21
    Mark Gosling & Heh Jason Huang (2009). The Fit Between Integrity and Integrative Social Contracts Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (3):407 - 417.
    The concept of integrity appears in many arguments and theories in business ethics and organizational behavior where it plays multiple roles. It has been shown to have desirable organizational outcomes and is held as important by the academic and practitioner alike. Yet despite its prominence there are a variety of approaches to defining and conceptualizing it and little existent theory to explain its nature. We offer integrative social contracts theory (ISCT) as a framework that can anchor integrity (...)
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  6.  13
    Johan Wempe (2009). Industry and Chain Responsibilities and Integrative Social Contracts Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):751 - 764.
    This article shows that business ethics is not capable of explaining the responsibility of limited organised collectives such as chains, sectors and industries. The responsibility of the pharmaceutical industry to make AIDS blockers available for patients in Africa is an example of such a sector responsibility. By using system theory, it is possible to understand responsibility at the level of a social system. The Integrative Social Contracts Theory has been extended to determine this system's responsibility.
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  7.  12
    Ben Wempe (2009). Extant Social Contracts and the Question of Business Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):741 - 750.
    ISCT arguably forms the most promising impetus to a contractarian theory of business ethics presently available. In this article, I want to pay tribute to the lasting significance of Dunfee's contribution to the field of business ethics by analyzing the vital role of the idea of extant social contracts (ESCs) in the conceptual set up of the ISCT project. The construct of ESCs can be shown to shape the problem statement from which the ISCT project proceeds – indeed it (...)
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  8.  8
    J. van Oosterhout & Pursey P. M. A. R. Heugens (2009). Extant Social Contracts in Global Business Regulation: Outline of a Research Agenda. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):729-740.
    The notion of extant social contracts (ESC), which was the original contribution that Tom Dunfee provided to contractualist business ethics (CBE) and Integrated Social Contracts Theory (ISCT) more specifically, has commanded less research attention to date than one would expect based on its apparent empirical face validity and its disciplinary spanning potential. This article attempts to revive the ESC concept in both normative and positive research at the intersection of business, management, and ethics and law. After identifying three (...)
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  9.  8
    Luca Anderlini & Leonardo Felli (1999). Incomplete Contracts and Complexity Costs. Theory and Decision 46 (1):23-50.
    This paper investigates, in a simple risk-sharing framework, the extent to which the incompleteness of contracts could be attributed to the complexity costs associated with the writing and the implementation of contracts. We show that, given any measure of complexity in a very general class, it is possible to find simple contracting problems such that, when complexity costs are explicitly taken into account, the contracting parties optimally choose an incomplete contract which coincides with the ‘default’ division of surplus. (...)
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  10.  2
    Yi-Chun Chen & Xiao Luo (2008). Delay in a Bargaining Game with Contracts. Theory and Decision 65 (4):339-353.
    In a multilateral bargaining game where a proposer and responders can set up a “principal–agent” relationship by means of binding cash-offer contracts, we show that there is a Markov SPE with a delay in reaching an agreement. We also show that all the individually rational and efficient payoffs can be supported by SPE.
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  11.  2
    Tomas Bagdanskis & Rasa Macijauskienė (2012). Application of Different Types of Employment Contracts in Lithuania – Related Heoretical and Practical Problems. Jurisprudence 19 (1):249-267.
    The article discusses theoretical and practical issues one may face when applying various types of employment contracts, refers to specific legal relations governed by Labour Code standards, and raises issues that would help to solve the existing troubles. Last decades as globalization processes were gaining pace, and market economy conditions changed, labour and production organization models were undergoing transformation. The more complex people’s social relationships are, the greater is the need to regulate these relationships, i. e. to adopt legislation (...)
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  12.  1
    Elizabeth Kingdom (2000). Cohabitation Contracts and the Democratization of Personal Relations. Feminist Legal Studies 8 (1):5-27.
    Feminist opposition to the use of cohabitationcontracts for the private regulation of personalrelations has been predicated on the classical readingof contract as commerce. On this reading,cohabitation contracts construct cohabitants'obligations as commercial and typically detrimental towomen because of their weaker bargaining power. Butthe premisses of classical contract theory are beingundermined by radical critiques which emphasize theimportance of relationality in the reading ofcontract. On such critiques, the obligationsconstructed by cohabitation contracts need no longerexclude considerations of the parties' differentfinancial status and (...)
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  13. Mohamed Gafsi, Geneviève Nguyen, Bruno Legagneux & Patrice Robin (2006). Sustainability and Multifunctionality in French Farms: Analysis of the Implementation of Territorial Farming Contracts. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 23 (4):463-475.
    Sustainable agriculture and ways to achieve it are important issues for agricultural policy. However, the concept of sustainability has yet to be made operational in many agricultural situations, and only a few studies so far have addressed the implementation process of sustainable agriculture. This paper provides an assessment of the Territorial Farming Contracts (TFC) – the French model for implementing sustainable agriculture – and aims to give some insights into the ways to facilitate the development of sustainable farming. Using (...)
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  14.  27
    Seth Lazar (2015). Authority, Oaths, Contracts, and Uncertainty in War. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 4 (1):52-58.
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  15.  28
    Andrew Spicer (2009). The Normalization of Corrupt Business Practices: Implications for Integrative Social Contracts Theory (ISCT). [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):833 - 840.
    I propose that the emphasis on "authentic" norms in the ISCT literature does not encompass the possibility of community norms that facilitate and maintain corrupt behavior. To fill this gap, I build on the normalization of corruption literature to present a typology of community norms that distinguishes between authentic, behavioral, and aspirational norm types as well as between illegitimate, authentic norms and illegitimate, behavioral norms. By refining the terminology used to evaluate community norms, I propose that ISCT can be (...)
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  16.  30
    Jeffery A. Thompson & David W. Hart (2006). Psychological Contracts: A Nano-Level Perspective on Social Contract Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):229 - 241.
    Social contract theory has been criticized as a “theory in search of application.” We argue that incorporating the nano, or individual, level of analysis into social contract inquiry will yield more descriptive theory. We draw upon the psychological contract perspective to address two critiques of social contract theory: its rigid macro-orientation and inattention to the process of contract formation. We demonstrate how a psychological contract approach offers practical insight into the impact of social contracting on day-to-day (...)
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  17. David Campbell, Hugh Collins & John Wightman (2003). Implicit Dimensions of Contract Discrete, Relational, and Network Contracts.
     
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  18.  3
    Jesús Cardeñosa & Pilar Lasala (1996). ARPO-2: An Expert System for Legal Advice on the Breach of Building Contracts. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 4 (2):133-156.
    Although Berman and Hafner [Berman 1989, pp. 928–938] presented the possibility to adapt the model of reasoning of development of an expert system for medical diagnosis to the reasoning of a judge when he/she sentences criminals does not resemble the reasoning found in the decisions of physicians, mathematicians or statisticians.When a lawyer reasons, he/she not only looks for the solution of a case; he/she simultaneously looks for the bases on which his/her reasoning can rest [Galindo 1992, pp. 363–367]. That is (...)
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  19.  9
    Thomas W. Dunfee (1991). Business Ethics and Extant Social Contracts. Business Ethics Quarterly 1 (1):23-51.
    Extant social contracts, deriving from communities of individuals, constitute a significant source of ethical norms in business. When found consistent with general ethical theories through the application of a fiItering test, these real social contracts generate prima facie duties of compliance on the part of those who expressly or impliedly consent to the terms of the social contract, and also on the part of those who take advantage of the instrumental value of the social contracts. Businesspeople typically (...)
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  20.  35
    Timothy L. Fort (2000). A Review of Donaldson and Dunfee's Ties That Bind: A Social Contracts Approach to Business Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 28 (4):383 - 387.
    This article reviews Thomas Donaldson and Thomas Dunfee's new book Ties That Bind. The article argues that the book is a helpful elaboration of Donaldson and Dunfee's Integrative Social Contracts Approach, particularly with regard to their specification of hypernorms. The article also presents Donaldson and Dunfee's argument with regard to how the hypernorm of necessary social efficiency applies to bribery and raises questions about the extent to which human moral behavior might be hardwired.
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  21.  10
    Robert A. Phillips & Michael E. Johnson-Cramer (2006). Ties That Unwind: Dynamism in Integrative Social Contracts Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (3):283 - 302.
    Social contract theory offers a powerful method and metaphor for the study of organizational ethics. This paper considers the variant of the social contract that has arguably gained the most attention among business ethicists: integrative social contracts theory or ISCT [Donaldson and Dunfee: 1999, Ties That Bind (Harvard Business School Press, Boston)]. A core precept of ISCT - that consent to membership in an organization entails obligations to follow the norms of that organization, subject to the moral minimums of (...)
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  22.  31
    Bryan W. Husted (1999). A Critique of the Empirical Methods of Integrative Social Contracts Theory. Journal of Business Ethics 20 (3):227 - 235.
    Integrative social contracts theory (ISCT) uses empirical methods to develop guidelines for international business ethics. This article criticizes ISCT in terms of the way people actually think about contracts and agreements around the globe. Differences in orientations to communications context, moral reasoning, and institutional and structural conditions make the identification of authentic norms, hypernorms, and relevant communities problematic. The difficulties of the empirical methods suggest recourse to more traditional theoretical approaches for the identification of hypernorms as well as (...)
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  23.  20
    Ryan Spellecy (2003). Reviving Ulysses Contracts. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (4):373-392.
    : Ulysses contracts have faced paternalism objections since they first were proposed. Since the contracts are designed to override a present request from a legally competent patient in favor of a past request made by that patient, enforcement of these contracts was argued to be unjustifiable strong paternalism. Recent legal developments and new theories of practical reasoning suggest that the discussion of Ulysses contracts should be revived. This paper argues that with a proper understanding of the (...)
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  24.  5
    John Hendry (2001). Economic Contracts Versus Social Relationships as a Foundation for Normative Stakeholder Theory. Business Ethics 10 (3):223–232.
    A number of the most influential presentations of normative stakeholder theory are based upon an economic model of the firm as a nexus of contracts. In this paper I argue that the use of such a model to address moral issues is both logically and practically problematic and effectively undermines the stakeholder position. I then sketch out the key characteristics of an alternative, social relationships model of the firm, and show how this might provide a basis for (...)
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  25.  12
    Virginia Gerde & R. Spencer Foster (2006). Political Contributions and Defense Contractors, and No-Bid Contracts. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:215-220.
    What role do political campaign contributions make in generating and maintaining political capital? Are no-bid contracts awarded to more influential defensecontractors? We explore these questions by conducting a social network analysis of defense contractors and their political campaign contributions to U.S. Representatives and Senators. Using a model of political capital from Rehbein, Schuler, and Doh (2005), we operationalize network ties in terms of political contributions and the relative influence of legislators and defense contractors.
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  26.  34
    Thomas J. Frecka (2008). Ethical Issues in Financial Reporting: Is Intentional Structuring of Lease Contracts to Avoid Capitalization Unethical? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 80 (1):45 - 59.
    Under present accounting rules, lessees frequently structure contracts for leased assets, in situations where they enjoy benefits similar to outright ownership, in a way that keeps both the leased assets and related liabilities off their books. This method of accounting creates off-balance sheet financing and is called operating lease accounting. The paper debates the ethicality of intentionally structuring lease contracts to avoid disclosing leased asset and liability amounts and describes the “slippery slope” of rule-based accounting for synthetic leases (...)
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  27.  21
    Tom Walker (2012). Ulysses Contracts in Medicine. Law and Philosophy 31 (1):77-98.
    Ulysses contracts are a method by which one person binds himself by agreeing to be bound by others. In medicine such contracts have primarily been discussed as ways of treating people with episodic mental illnesses, where the features of the illness are such that they now judge that they will refuse treatment at the time it is needed. Enforcing Ulysses contracts in these circumstances would require medical professionals to override the express refusal of the patient at the (...)
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  28.  14
    Mark Collen (2009). Opioid Contracts and Random Drug Testing for People with Chronic Pain €” Think Twice. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 37 (4):841-845.
    The use of opioid contracts, which often require patients to submit to random drug screens, have become widespread amongst physicians using opioids to treat chronic pain. The main purpose of the contract is to improve care through better adherence to opioid therapy but there is little evidence as to its efficacy. The author suggests the use of opioid contracts and random drug testing destroys patients' trust which impacts health outcomes, and that physicians' motivation for their use are concerns (...)
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  29.  22
    Theo Van Willigenburg & Patrick J. J. Delaere (2005). Protecting Autonomy as Authenticity Using Ulysses Contracts. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (4):395 – 409.
    Pre-commitment directives or Ulysses contracts are often defended as instruments that may strengthen the autonomous self-control of episodically disordered psychiatric patients. Autonomy is understood in this context in terms of sovereignty ("governing" or "managing" oneself). After critically analyzing this idea of autonomy in the context of various forms of self-commitment and pre-commitment, we argue that what is at stake in using Ulysses contracts in psychiatry is not autonomy as sovereignty, but autonomy as authenticity. Pre-commitment directives do not function (...)
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  30.  16
    Emily M. Weitzenböck (2004). Good Faith and Fair Dealing in Contracts Formed and Performed by Electronic Agents. Artificial Intelligence and Law 12 (1-2):83-110.
    The development of electronic agents that increasingly play an active role in the contract formation and execution process has highlighted the need for the creation of law-abiding autonomous agent systems. The principle of good faith is an important guideline for contractual behaviour which permeates civil law systems. This paper examines how this principle is applied both during the negotiation of a contract and during its performance. Selected examples from civil law literature of precontractual duties of good faith, and of precontractual (...)
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  31.  48
    Brian Bix (2010). Contracts. In Franklin G. Miller & Alan Wertheimer (eds.), The Ethics of Consent: Theory and Practice. Oxford University Press
    Consent, in terms of voluntary choice, is - or, at least, appears to be or purports to be - at the essence of contract law. Contract law, both in principle and in practice, is about allowing parties to enter arrangements on terms they choose - each party imposing obligations on itself in return for obligations another party has placed upon itself. This freedom of contract- an ideal by which there are obligations to the extent, but only to the extent, freely (...)
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  32.  24
    Simon Huttegger & Rory Smead (2011). Efficient Social Contracts and Group Selection. Biology and Philosophy 26 (4):517-531.
    We consider the Stag Hunt in terms of Maynard Smith’s famous Haystack model. In the Stag Hunt, contrary to the Prisoner’s Dilemma, there is a cooperative equilibrium besides the equilibrium where every player defects. This implies that in the Haystack model, where a population is partitioned into groups, groups playing the cooperative equilibrium tend to grow faster than those at the non-cooperative equilibrium. We determine under what conditions this leads to the takeover of the population by cooperators. Moreover, we compare (...)
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  33.  3
    Thomas W. Dunfee (1995). Introduction to the Special Issue on Social Contracts and Business Ethics. Business Ethics Quarterly 5 (2):167-171.
    This article introduces several papers on social contracts and business ethics, published in the April 2005 issue of the journal "Business Ethics Quarterly.".
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  34.  25
    Bernd Theilen (2012). Decentralization of Contracts with Interim Side-Contracting. Theory and Decision 73 (4):561-590.
    This article gives a new explanation for the phenomenon of subcontracting. A model in which a principal contracts two agents who work in a sequence on a project, have soft information and can collude is considered. Side-contracts between agents can be signed at any stage of the game. It is shown that in this setting both a decentralized contracting structure, in which contracting of the agents at the initial production stage is delegated to the agent at the final (...)
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  35.  8
    James Dempsey (2011). Pluralistic Business Ethics: The Significance and Justification of Moral Free Space in Integrative Social Contracts Theory. Business Ethics 20 (3):253-266.
    Integrative social contracts theory (ISCT) has been an influential theory in normative business ethics for well over a decade, drawing attention both as an object of criticism and as a source of inspiration. In this paper I argue that, despite this attention, the fact that it is a genuinely pluralistic theory, in the tradition of pluralistic theories of political philosophy, is often overlooked. It is in the notion of moral free space that this pluralism is most clearly expressed. This (...)
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  36.  41
    Ruben Berrios (2006). Government Contracts and Contractor Behavior. Journal of Business Ethics 63 (2):119 - 130.
    The U.S. government embraces the concepts of privatization and market competition, but the realm of contracting shows that it has not always been able to put its principles into practice. Although the contracting system is supposed to be open and competitive, in recent years the government has often awarded contracts with little or no competitive bidding, has chosen to award mostly cost-plus type contracts that force the government to assume more of the risk, and lacked efficiency in monitoring (...)
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  37.  6
    Virginia Gerde & R. Spencer Foster (2006). Political Contributions and Defense Contractors, and No-Bid Contracts. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:215-220.
    What role do political campaign contributions make in generating and maintaining political capital? Are no-bid contracts awarded to more influential defensecontractors? We explore these questions by conducting a social network analysis of defense contractors and their political campaign contributions to U.S. Representatives and Senators. Using a model of political capital from Rehbein, Schuler, and Doh (2005), we operationalize network ties in terms of political contributions and the relative influence of legislators and defense contractors.
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  38.  15
    Jacob T. Levy (2009). Not So Novus an Ordo: Constitutions Without Social Contracts. Political Theory 37 (2):191 - 217.
    Social contract theory imagines political societies as resting on a fundamental agreement, adopted at a discrete moment in hypothetical time, that binds individual persons together into a polity and sets fundamental rules regarding that polity's structure and powers. Written constitutions, adopted at real moments in historical time, dictating governmental structures, bounding governmental powers, and entrenching individual rights, look temptingly like social contracts reified. Yet something essential is lost in this slippage between social contract theory and the practice of constitutionalism. (...)
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  39.  46
    Chrisoula Andreou (2008). Making a Clean Break: Addiction and Ulysses Contracts. Bioethics 22 (1):25–31.
    I examine current models of self-destructive addictive behaviour, and argue that there is an important place for Ulysses contracts in coping with addictive behaviour that stems from certain problematic preference structures. Given the relevant preference structures, interference based on a Ulysses contract need not involve questionably favouring an agent’s past preferences over her current preferences, but can actually be justified in terms of the agent’s current concerns and commitments.
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  40.  15
    Harry J. Van Buren (2000). The Bindingness of Social and Psychological Contracts: Toward a Theory of Social Responsibility in Downsizing. Journal of Business Ethics 25 (3):205-219.
    Downsizing has become a significant public issue that has not yet been significantly studied by business ethicists. It is proposed that reasonable social and psychological contracts bound the moral free space of managers contemplating downsizing; the degree of constraint is also dependent on the organization's resource munificence. A framework for considering the extent of managerial moral free space and implications thereof for managerial practice are offered.
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  41.  21
    Alan Wertheimer (1992). Unconscionability and Contracts. Business Ethics Quarterly 2 (4):479-496.
    This article considers the principles that underlie the claim that some contracts are unconscionable and that such contracts should not be enforceable. It argues that it is much more difficult to explain unconscionability than is often supposed, particularly in cases where the contract is mutually advantageous or Pareto superior. Among other things, the article considers whether unconscionability is a defect in process or result, whether the gains in an unconscionable contract are disproportionate, whether there is a strong link (...)
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  42.  5
    Simon Gardner (1987). Equity, Estate Contracts and the Judicature Acts: Walsh V Lonsdale Revisited. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 7 (1):60-103.
    This study examines the apparently well-established rule that the equitable doctrine of conversion operates on a contract to grant an interest only so long as it is specifically enforceable. It observes that in principle and in practice there is good reason to believe this not to be the case. It looks at the original culture of conversion, in terms of the historical relationship of property and contract from which it emerged, but suggests that the specific enforceability rule first arose out (...)
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  43.  5
    Daniel Rothbart (1984). Moral Contracts and the Patient-Physician Relationship. Journal of Bioethics 5 (1):54-62.
    Moral contracts and the patient-physician relationship.
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  44.  5
    Rick Bigwood (2005). Contracts by Unfair Advantage: From Exploitation to Transactional Neglect. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 25 (1):65-96.
    This article aims to effectuate a paradigm shift in the way we view cases involving pure advantage-taking in contract formation. By ‘pure advantage-taking’ it is meant that D in some sense took ‘unfair advantage of’ a special bargaining weakness or vulnerability that D found ‘ready-made’ in P: D neither caused P’s relevant weakness or vulnerability nor otherwise was legally responsible for relieving it.Certain undue influence and unconscionable dealing cases (for example) fit this scenario perfectly, yet senior Commonwealth courts consistently assert (...)
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  45.  3
    Frank D. Merry, Pervaze A. Sheikh & David G. Mcgrath (2004). The Role of Informal Contracts in the Growth of Small Cattle Herds on the Floodplains of the Lower Amazon. Agriculture and Human Values 21 (4):377-386.
    In the absence of access to formal credit, informal contracts with independent investors give the small ranchers of the Lower Amazon an acceptable means through which to surmount the high investment hurdle of starting a cattle herd. These contracts – called sociedades – allow small ranchers to raise an outside investor's cattle in return for a portion of the offspring and are commonplace in the cattle production systems of the Amazon. But, notwithstanding a vast literature on cattle production (...)
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  46. lan Rees Jones (1995). Health Care Need and Contracts for Health Services. Health Care Analysis 3 (2):91-98.
    Assessments of health care needs are embedded in contracts for health services. Such contracts are the formal link between the identification of health care needs and the purchasing of services to satisfy those needs. They are a central part of the procedural relationship between the British health service (NHS) and the satisfaction of human needs. To evaluate contracts it is necessary to investigate this relationship. A number of headings under which it may be possible to begin to (...)
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  47.  4
    Inga Kudinavičiūtė-Michailovienė (2011). Pecularities of Legal Regulation of Marriage Contracts. Jurisprudence 18 (1):143-159.
    Under the market economy, a contract serves as the main regulatory instrument of mutual rights and obligations of private law subjects. Many different types of contracts allow people to satisfy their needs and to achieve the desired results. Most contracts are concluded subject to established common criteria, yet almost every type of contract has also its own specifics. The article examines the marriage contract with its particular features (subjects, content, etc.) and analyses its complex nature and its main (...)
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  48.  1
    Aspassia Daskalopulu & Marek Sergot (1997). The Representation of Legal Contracts. AI and Society 11 (1-2):6-17.
    The paper outlines ongoing research on logic-based tools for the analysis and representation of legal contracts, of the kind frequently encountered in large-scale engineering projects and complex, long-term trading agreements. We consider both contract formation and contract performance, in each case identifying the representational issues and the prospects for providing automated support tools.
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  49.  4
    D. Z. Buchman & A. Ho (2014). What's Trust Got to Do with It? Revisiting Opioid Contracts. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (10):673-677.
    Prescription opioid abuse (POA) is an escalating clinical and public health problem. Physician worries about iatrogenic addiction and whether patients are ‘drug seeking’, ‘abusing’ and ‘diverting’ prescription opioids exist against a backdrop of professional and legal consequences of prescribing that have created a climate of distrust in chronic pain management. One attempt to circumvent these worries is the use of opioid contracts that outline conditions patients must agree to in order to receive opioids. Opioid contracts have received some (...)
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    K. A. Bramstedt (2006). Transfusion Contracts for Jehovah's Witnesses Receiving Organ Transplants: Ethical Necessity or Coercive Pact? Journal of Medical Ethics 32 (4):193-195.
    Jehovah’s Witnesses should be required to sign transfusion contracts in order to be eligible for transplant.Human donor organs continue to be in short supply, and many potential transplant recipients die while waiting for an allograft to become available.1 Because the organ supply is so limited and the offering of organs is based on the generosity of patients and families, proper stewardship of these organs is an ethical obligation for transplant teams, as well as organ recipients. Preventable graft loss must (...)
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