Search results for 'Control (Psychology' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  1
    Philip Julian Runkel (2003). People as Living Things: The Psychology of Perceptual Control. Living Control Systems Pub..
    Runkel links Perceptual Control Theory (PCT) thinking to psychological literature and discusses it against that background.
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  2. Myles I. Friedman (1991). The Psychology of Human Control: A General Theory of Purposeful Behavior. Praeger.
  3. Meinrad Perrez & Peter Wilhelm (2000). Control Psychology Under the Control of Questionnaires? The Search for an Alternative Assessment Procedure. In Walter J. Perrig & Alexander Grob (eds.), Control of Human Behavior, Mental Processes, and Consciousness: Essays in Honor of the 60th Birthday of August Flammer. Erlbaum
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  4.  21
    Neil Levy (ed.) (2014). Addiction and Self-Control: Perspectives From Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience. OUP Usa.
    This book brings cutting edge neuroscience and psychology into dialogue with philosophical reflection to illuminate the loss of control experienced by addicts, and thereby cast light on ordinary agency and the way in which it sometimes goes wrong.
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  5.  24
    Daniel M. Wegner (1989). White Bears and Other Unwanted Thoughts: Suppression, Obsession, and the Psychology of Mental Control. Penguin.
    Drawing on theories of William James, Freud, and Dewey, as well as on studies in mood control, cognitive therapy, and artificial intelligence, this...
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  6.  4
    Steven J. Youngblood (2005). The Bull in the China Shop: A Discussion of an Ambiguity Within Pettit's Theory of Freedom as Discursive Control (Philip Pettit, A Theory of Freedom: From the Psychology to the Politics of Agency). Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 1 (1):185-190.
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  7.  1
    Ellen E. Furlong, Stephanie AuBuchon, Jessica Kraut, Netherland Joiner, Jennifer Knowles, Kali Lewis, Megan Win & Jack Furlong (2015). From Crisis to Crowd Control. Commentary: A Crisis in Comparative Psychology: Where Have All the Undergraduates Gone? Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  8. Rongjun Yu & Li Chen (2015). The Need to Control for Regression to the Mean in Social Psychology Studies. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  9.  23
    Steven Cottam (2011). Self-Control Failure in Catholicism, Islam, and Cognitive Psychology. Zygon 46 (2):491-499.
    Abstract. Our human condition is often defined in terms of human fallibility; we are human specifically because we fail to live up to our own expectations. This paper explores various conceptions of one form of human fallibility: self-control failure. Self-control failure is examined through two conceptualizations, with each conceptualization observed through a corresponding theological and psychological lens: first, as the result of a divided, conflicted humanity, as understood by the Catholic Doctrine of Original Sin and psychological Dual-Process Theories (...)
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  10.  13
    Philip David Zelazo & Douglas Frye (1999). Consciousness and Control: The Argument From Developmental Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (5):788-789.
    Limitations of Dienes & Perner's (D&P's) theory are traced to the assumption that the higher-order thought (HOT) theory of consciousness is true. D&P claim that 18-month-old children are capable of explicitly representing factuality, from which it follows (on D&P's theory) that they are capable of explicitly representing content, attitude, and self. D&P then attempt to explain 3-year-olds' failures on tests of voluntary control such as the dimensional change card sort by suggesting that at this age children cannot represent content (...)
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  11. Chris Englert (2016). The Strength Model of Self-Control in Sport and Exercise Psychology. Frontiers in Psychology 7.
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  12.  3
    Matt King (2015). Levy, Neil, Ed.Addiction and Self-Control: Perspectives From Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience.Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013. Pp. 288. $59.95. [REVIEW] Ethics 125 (2):586-590.
  13.  4
    T. Shallice (1984). Psychology and Social Control. Cognition 17 (1):29-48.
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  14.  3
    Review by: Matt King (2015). Review: Neil Levy, Ed., Addiction and Self-Control: Perspectives From Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience. [REVIEW] Ethics 125 (2):586-590,.
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  15.  6
    John D. Greenwood (1988). On the Social Psychology of Therapy Evaluation: Control Treatments and the Natural Negotiation Hypothesis. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 18 (4):373–389.
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  16.  5
    Thomas W. Simon (1975). Book Review:Purposive Explanation in Psychology Margaret A. Boden; Behavior: The Control of Perception William T. Powers. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 42 (1):103-.
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  17. J. F. Staal (1966). Reviews. Noam Chomsky. Syntactic Structures. Janua Linguarum, Studia Memoriae Nicolai van Wijk Dedicata, Series Minor No. 4. Mouton & Co., ‘s-Gravenhage 1957, 116 Pp. Noam Chomsky. Three Models for the Description of Language. A Reprint of XXIII 71. Readings in Mathematical Psychology, Volume II, Edited by R. Duncan Luce, Robert R. Bush, and Eugene Galanter, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, London, and Sydney, 1965, Pp. 105–124. Noam Chomsky. Logical Structures in Language. American Documentation, Vol. 8 , Pp. 284–291. Noam Chomsky and George A. Miller. Finite State Languages. Information and Control, Vol. 1 , Pp. 91–112. Reprinted in Readings in Mathematical Psychology, Volume II, Edited by R. Duncan Luce, Robert R. Bush, and Eugene Galanter, John Wiley and Sons, Inc., New York, London, and Sydney, 1965, Pp. 156–171. Noam Chomsky. On Certain Formal Properties of Grammars. Information and Control, Vol. 2 , Pp. 137–167. Reprinted in Readings in Mathematical Psychology, Volume II, Ed. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 31 (2):245-251.
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  18.  10
    Zahra Rezazadeh, P. J. Watson, Christopher J. L. Cunningham & Nima Ghorbani (2011). Dialogical Validity of Religious Measures in Iran: Relationships with Integrative Self-Knowledge and Self-Control of the “Perfect Man”. Archive for the Psychology of Religion 33 (1):93-113.
    According to the ideological surround model of research, a more “objective” psychology of religion requires efforts to bring etic social scientific and emic religious perspectives into formal dialog. This study of 245 Iranian university students illustrated how the dialogical validity of widely used etic measures of religion can be assessed by examining an emic religious perspective on psychology. Integrative Self-Knowledge and Self-Control Scales recorded two aspects of the “Perfect Man” as described by the Iranian Muslim philosopher Mortazā Motahharī. Use (...)
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  19.  5
    Nima Ghorbani, P. J. Watson, Zahra Rezazadeh & Christopher J. L. Cunningham (2011). Dialogical Validity of Religious Measures in Iran: Relationships with Integrative Self-Knowledge and Self-Control of the “Perfect Man” (Ensān-E Kāmel). Archive for the Psychology of Religion 33 (1):93-113.
    According to the ideological surround model of research, a more “objective” psychology of religion requires efforts to bring etic social scientific and emic religious perspectives into formal dialog. This study of 245 Iranian university students illustrated how the dialogical validity of widely used etic measures of religion can be assessed by examining an emic religious perspective on psychology. Integrative Self-Knowledge and Self-Control Scales recorded two aspects of the “Perfect Man” as described by the Iranian Muslim philosopher Mortazā Motahharī. Use (...)
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  20.  17
    Fathali M. Moghaddam (1998). Illusions of Control: Striving for Control in Our Personal and Professional Lives. Praeger.
    Exploring illusions of control in a wide variety of domains, the authors posit a practical way to minimize negative consequences.
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  21. William T. Powers (1973). Behavior: The Control of Perception. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  22. Cecilia Essau (1992). Primary-Secondary Control and Coping: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. S. Roderer Verlag.
     
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  23. Ronald Victor Sampson (1966). The Psychology of Power. New York, Pantheon Books.
     
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  24. Abraham J. Twerski (2003). Successful Relationships: At Home, at Work, and with Friends: Bringing Control Issues Under Control. Distributed by Mesorah Publications.
  25.  54
    Thomas T. Hills (2011). The Evolutionary Origins of Cognitive Control. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):231-237.
    The question of domain-specific versus domain-general processing is an ongoing source of inquiry surrounding cognitive control. Using a comparative evolutionary approach, Stout (2010) proposed two components of cognitive control: coordinating hierarchical action plans and social cognition. This article reports additional molecular and experimental evidence supporting a domain-general attentional process coordinating hierarchical action plans, with the earliest such control processing originating in the capacity of dynamic foraging behaviors—predating the vertebrate-invertebrate divergence (c. 700 million years ago). Further discussion addresses (...)
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  26.  24
    Mathieu Doucet & John Turri (2014). Non-Psychological Weakness of Will: Self-Control, Stereotypes, and Consequences. Synthese 191 (16):3935-3954.
    Prior work on weakness of will has assumed that it is a thoroughly psychological phenomenon. At least, it has assumed that ordinary attributions of weakness of will are purely psychological attributions, keyed to the violation of practical commitments by the weak-willed agent. Debate has recently focused on which sort of practical commitment, intention or normative judgment, is more central to the ordinary concept of weakness of will. We report five experiments that significantly advance our understanding of weakness of will attributions (...)
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  27.  11
    Thomas Li-Ping Tang & Toto Sutarso (2013). Falling or Not Falling Into Temptation? Multiple Faces of Temptation, Monetary Intelligence, and Unethical Intentions Across Gender. Journal of Business Ethics 116 (3):529-552.
    We develop a theoretical model, explore the relationship between temptation (both reflective and formative) and unethical intentions by treating monetary intelligence (MI) as a mediator, and examine the direct (temptation to unethical intentions) and indirect (temptation to MI to unethical intentions) paths simultaneously based on multiple-wave panel data collected from 340 part-time employees and university (business) students. The positive indirect path suggested that yielding to temptation (e.g., high cognitive impairment and lack of self-control) led to poor MI (low stewardship (...)
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  28. Wan Har Chong (2006). Personal Agency Beliefs in Self-Regulation: The Exercise of Personal Responsibility, Choice and Control in Learning. Marshall Cavendish Academic.
  29. Joshua Knobe (2006). The Concept of Intentional Action: A Case Study in the Uses of Folk Psychology. Philosophical Studies 130 (2):203-231.
    It is widely believed that the primary function of folk psychology lies in the prediction, explanation and control of behavior. A question arises, however, as to whether folk psychology has also been shaped in fundamental ways by the various other roles it plays in people’s lives. Here I approach that question by considering one particular aspect of folk psychology – the distinction between intentional and unintentional behaviors. The aim is to determine whether this distinction is best understood as a (...)
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  30. Daniel D. Hutto (2004). The Limits of Spectatorial Folk Psychology. Mind and Language 19 (5):548-73.
    It is almost universally agreed that the main business of commonsense psychology is that of providing generally reliable predictions and explanations of the actions of others. In line with this, it is also generally assumed that we are normally at theoretical remove from others such that we are always ascribing causally efficacious mental states to them for the purpose of prediction, explanation and control. Building on the work of those who regard our primary intersubjective interactions as a form of (...)
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  31.  16
    Jeffrey B. Adams & Ronald B. Miller (2008). Bridging Psychology's Scientist Vs. Practitioner Divide: Fruits of a Twenty-Five Year Dialogue. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 28 (2):375-394.
    In 1988, the control of the American Psychological Association shifted to those advocating the interests of professional practice and a substantial segment of the scientific community in psychology seceded to form the American Psychological Society, devoted to scientific psychology and scientific-based practice. In this climate, it has become increasingly difficult for scientists and practitioners to maintain analytical discussions of the philosophical and methodological issues that divide these two groups. For over 25 years, the authors have been fortunate to have (...)
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  32. Andy Taylor (2010). Moral Responsibility and Subverting Causes. Dissertation, University of Reading
    I argue against two of the most influential contemporary theories of moral responsibility: those of Harry Frankfurt and John Martin Fischer. Both propose conditions which are supposed to be sufficient for direct moral responsibility for actions. (By the term direct moral responsibility, I mean moral responsibility which is not traced from an earlier action.) Frankfurt proposes a condition of 'identification'; Fischer, writing with Mark Ravizza, proposes conditions for 'guidance control'. I argue, using counterexamples, that neither is sufficient for direct (...)
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  33. Alfred R. Mele (1987). Irrationality: An Essay on Akrasia, Self-Deception, and Self-Control. Oxford University Press.
    Although much human action serves as proof that irrational behavior is remarkably common, certain forms of irrationality--most notably, incontinent action and self-deception--pose such difficult theoretical problems that philosophers have rejected them as logically or psychologically impossible. Here, Mele shows that, and how, incontinent action and self-deception are indeed possible. Drawing upon recent experimental work in the psychology of action and inference, he advances naturalized explanations of akratic action and self-deception while resolving the paradoxes around which the philosophical literature revolves. In (...)
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  34.  17
    Charles S. Carver (1998). On the Self-Regulation of Behavior. Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a thorough overview of a model of human functioning based on the idea that behavior is goal-directed and regulated by feedback control processes. It describes feedback processes and their application to behavior, considers goals and the idea that goals are organized hierarchically, examines affect as deriving from a different kind of feedback process, and analyzes how success expectancies influence whether people keep trying to attain goals or disengage. Later sections consider a series of emerging themes, including (...)
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  35.  26
    Howard Rachlin (1995). Self-Control: Beyond Commitment. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):109-121.
    Self-control, so important in the theory and practice of psychology, has usually been understood introspectively. This target article adopts a behavioral view of the self (as an abstract class of behavioral actions) and of self-control (as an abstract behavioral pattern dominating a particular act) according to which the development of self-control is a molar/molecular conflict in the development of behavioral patterns. This subsumes the more typical view of self-control as a now/later conflict in which an act (...)
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  36. Joshua Shepherd (2015). Deciding as Intentional Action: Control Over Decisions. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (2):335-351.
    Common-sense folk psychology and mainstream philosophy of action agree about decisions: these are under an agent's direct control, and are thus intentional actions for which agents can be held responsible. I begin this paper by presenting a problem for this view. In short, since the content of the motivational attitudes that drive deliberation and decision remains open-ended until the moment of decision, it is unclear how agents can be thought to exercise control over what they decide at the (...)
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  37. Richard P. Cooper (2010). Cognitive Control: Componential or Emergent? Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (4):598-613.
    The past 25 years have witnessed an increasing awareness of the importance of cognitive control in the regulation of complex behavior. It now sits alongside attention, memory, language, and thinking as a distinct domain within cognitive psychology. At the same time it permeates each of these sibling domains. This introduction reviews recent work on cognitive control in an attempt to provide a context for the fundamental question addressed within this topic: Is cognitive control to be understood as (...)
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  38.  59
    Jeanette Kennett (2001). Agency and Responsibility: A Common-Sense Moral Psychology. Oxford University Press.
    Is it ever possible for people to act freely and intentionally against their better judgement? Is it ever possible to act in opposition to one's strongest desire? If either of these questions are answered in the negative, the common-sense distinctions between recklessness, weakness of will and compulsion collapse. This would threaten our ordinary notion of self-control and undermine our practice of holding each other responsible for moral failure. So a clear and plausible account of how weakness of will and (...)
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  39.  7
    Kentaro Fujita, Jessica J. Carnevale & Yaacov Trope (forthcoming). Understanding Self-Control as a Whole Vs. Part Dynamic. Neuroethics:1-14.
    Although dual-process or divided-mind models of self-control dominate the literature, they suffer from empirical and conceptual challenges. We propose an alternative approach, suggesting that self-control can be characterized by a fragmented part versus integrated whole dynamic. Whereas responses to events derived from fragmented parts of the mind undermine self-control, responses to events derived from integrated wholes enhance self-control. We review empirical evidence from psychology and related disciplines that support this model. We, moreover, discuss the implications of (...)
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  40.  77
    Harmon R. Holcomb (1996). Just so Stories and Inference to the Best Explanation in Evolutionary Psychology. Minds and Machines 6 (4):525-540.
    Evolutionary psychology is a science in the making, working toward the goal of showing how psychological adaptation underlies much human behavior. The knee-jerk reaction that sociobiology is unscientific because it tells just-so stories has become a common charge against evolutionary psychology as well. My main positive thesis is that inference to the best explanation is a proper method for evolutionary analyses, and it supplies a new perspective on the issues raised in Schlinger's (1996) just-so story critique. My main negative thesis (...)
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  41.  35
    Frederick Toates (2005). Evolutionary Psychology -- Towards a More Integrative Model. Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):305-328.
    Aspects of the history of behavioural science are reviewed, pointing to its fragmented and faction-ridden nature. The emergence of evolutionary psychology (EP) is viewed in this context. With the help of a dual-layered model of behavioural control, the case is made for a more integrative perspective towards EP. The model's application to both behaviour and complex human information processing is described. Similarities in their control are noted. It is suggested that one layer of control (‘on-line’) corresponds to (...)
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  42.  50
    Dario D. Salvucci & Niels A. Taatgen (2011). Toward a Unified View of Cognitive Control. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (2):227-230.
    Allen Newell (1973) once observed that psychology researchers were playing “twenty questions with nature,” carving up human cognition into hundreds of individual phenomena but shying away from the difficult task of integrating these phenomena with unifying theories. We argue that research on cognitive control has followed a similar path, and that the best approach toward unifying theories of cognitive control is that proposed by Newell, namely developing theories in computational cognitive architectures. Threaded cognition, a recent theory developed within (...)
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  43.  12
    Judith Rodin, Carmi Schooler & K. Warner Schaie (eds.) (1990). Self-Directedness: Cause and Effects Throughout the Life Course. L. Erlbaum Associates.
    This book, the third in a series on the life course, has significance in today's world of research, professional practice, and public policy because it symbolizes the gradual reemergence of power in the social sciences. Focusing on "self-directedness and efficacy" over the life course, this text addresses the following issues: * the causes of change * how changes affect the individual, the family system, social groups, and society at large * how various disciplines--anthropology, sociology, psychology, epidemiology--approach this field of study, (...)
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  44.  7
    James W. Moore & P. C. Fletcher (2012). Sense of Agency in Health and Disease: A Review of Cue Integration Approaches. [REVIEW] Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):59-68.
    Sense of agency is a compelling but fragile experience that is augmented or attenuated by internal signals and by external cues. A disruption in SoA may characterise individual symptoms of mental illness such as delusions of control. Indeed, it has been argued that generic SoA disturbances may lie at the heart of delusions and hallucinations that characterise schizophrenia. A clearer understanding of how sensorimotor, perceptual and environmental cues complement, or compete with, each other in engendering SoA may prove valuable (...)
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  45.  79
    Edmund Henden (2008). What is Self-Control? Philosophical Psychology 21 (1):69 – 90.
    What is self-control and how does the concept of self-control relate to the notion of will-power? A widespread philosophical opinion has been that the notion of will-power does not add anything beyond what can be said using other motivational notions, such as strength of desire and intention. One exception is Richard Holton who, inspired by recent research in social psychology, has argued that will-power is a separate faculty needed for persisting in one's resolutions, what he calls 'strength of (...)
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  46.  50
    Thor Grünbaum (2011). Commonsense Psychology, Dual Visual Streams, and the Individuation of Action. Philosophical Psychology 25 (1):25 - 47.
    Psychologists and philosophers are often tempted to make general claims about the importance of certain experimental results for our commonsense notions of intentional agency, moral responsibility, and free will. It is a strong intuition that if the agent does not intentionally control her own behavior, her behavior will not be an expression of agency, she will not be morally responsible for its consequences, and she will not be acting as a free agent. It therefore seems natural that the interest (...)
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  47.  26
    Jeanette Kennett (2013). Just Say No? Addiction and the Elements of Self-Control. In Neil Levy (ed.), Addiction and Self-Control: Perspectives from Philosophy, Psychology, and Neuroscience. Oxford University Press 144-164.
    In this chapter I argue that there is a normative aspect to self-control that is not captured by the purely procedural account to be drawn from dual process theories of cognition – which we only uncover when we consider what self-control is for and why it is valuable. For at least a significant sub-group of addicts their loss of control over their drug use may not be due to a lack or depletion of cognitive resources. Rather it (...)
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  48.  27
    Cara Spencer (2007). Unconscious Vision and the Platitudes of Folk Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 20 (3):309 – 327.
    Since we explain behavior by ascribing intentional states to the agent, many philosophers have assumed that some guiding principle of folk psychology like [Intentional States and Actions] must be true. [Intentional States and Actions]: If A and B are different actions, then the agents performing them must differ in their intentional states at the time they are performed. Recent results in the physiology of vision present a prima facie problem for this principle. These results show that some visual information that (...)
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  49.  24
    Endre E. Kadar & Judith A. Effken (2005). From Discrete Actors to Goal-Directed Actions: Toward a Process-Based Methodology for Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 18 (3):353 – 382.
    Studying social phenomena is often assumed to be inherently different from studying natural science phenomena. In psychology, this assumption has led to a division of the field into social and experimental domains. The same kind of division has carried over into ecological psychology, despite the fact that Gibson clearly intended his theory for both social and natural phenomena. In this paper, we argue that the social/natural science dichotomy can be derived from a distinction between hermeneutics and science that is deeply (...)
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  50.  15
    Cara Spencer (2007). Unconscious Vision and the Platitudes of Folk Psychology. Philosophical Psychology 20 (3):309 – 327.
    Since we explain behavior by ascribing intentional states to the agent, many philosophers have assumed that some guiding principle of folk psychology like the following, which I call intentional states and actions (ISA), must be true: "If A and B are different actions, then the agents performing them must differ in their intentional states at the time they are performed." Recent results in the physiology of vision present a prima facie problem for this principle. These results show that some visual (...)
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