Search results for 'Copenhagen interpretation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Willem M. De Muynck (2004). Towards a Neo-Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 34 (5):717-770.score: 132.0
    The Copenhagen interpretation is critically considered. A number of ambiguities, inconsistencies and confusions are discussed. It is argued that it is possible to purge the interpretation so as to obtain a consistent and reasonable way to interpret the mathematical formalism of quantum mechanics, which is in agreement with the way this theory is dealt with in experimental practice. In particular, the essential role attributed by the Copenhagen interpretation to measurement is acknowledged. For this reason it (...)
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  2. Kristian Camilleri (2009). Constructing the Myth of the Copenhagen Interpretation. Perspectives on Science 17 (1):pp. 26-57.score: 120.0
    According to the standard view, the so-called ‘Copenhagen interpretation’ of quantum mechanics originated in discussions between Bohr and Heisenberg in 1927, and was defended by Bohr in his classic debate with Einstein. Yet recent scholarship has shown Bohr’s views were never widely accepted, let alone properly understood, by his contemporaries, many of whom held divergent views of the ‘Copenhagen orthodoxy’. This paper examines how the ‘myth of the Copenhagen interpretation’ was constructed by situating it in (...)
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  3. Ravi Gomatam, Niels Bohr's Interpretation and the Copenhagen Interpretation.score: 120.0
    The Copenhagen interpretation, which informs the textbook presentation of quantum mechanics, depends fundamentally on the notion of ontological wave-particle duality and a viewpoint called “complementarity”. In this paper, Bohr’s own interpretation is traced in detail and is shown to be fundamentally different from and even opposed to the Copenhagen interpretation in virtually all its particulars. In particular, Bohr’s interpretation avoids the ad hoc postulate of wave function ‘collapse’ that is central to the Copenhagen (...)
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  4. Ravi Gomatam (2007). Niels Bohr's Interpretation and the Copenhagen Interpretation—Are the Two Incompatible? Philosophy of Science 74 (5):736-748.score: 120.0
    The Copenhagen interpretation, which informs the textbook presentation of quantum mechanics, depends fundamentally on the notion of ontological wave-particle duality and a viewpoint called “complementarity.” In this paper, Bohr's own interpretation is traced in detail and is shown to be fundamentally different from and even opposed to the Copenhagen interpretation in virtually all its particulars. In particular, Bohr's interpretation avoids the ad hoc postulate of wave function ‘collapse' that is central to the Copenhagen (...)
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  5. Don Howard (2004). Who Invented the “Copenhagen Interpretation”? A Study in Mythology. Philosophy of Science 71 (5):669-682.score: 120.0
    What is commonly known as the Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, regarded as representing a unitary Copenhagen point of view, differs significantly from Bohr's complementarity interpretation, which does not employ wave packet collapse in its account of measurement and does not accord the subjective observer any privileged role in measurement. It is argued that the Copenhagen interpretation is an invention of the mid‐1950s, for which Heisenberg is chiefly responsible, various other physicists and philosophers, including (...)
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  6. A. Peres (2002). Karl Popper and the Copenhagen Interpretation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 33 (1):23-34.score: 120.0
    Popper conceived an experiment whose analysis led to a result that he deemed absurd. Popper wrote that his reasoning was based on the Copenhagen interpretation and therefore invalidated it. Many authors who have examined Popper's analysis have found in it various technical flaws which are briefly summarized here. However, the aim of the present article is not technical. My concern is to redress logical flaws in Popper's argument: the terminology he uses is ambiguous, his analysis involves counterfactual hypotheses, (...)
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  7. Norwood Russell Hanson (1959). Five Cautions for the Copenhagen Interpretation's Critics. Philosophy of Science 26 (4):325-337.score: 120.0
    Within the past decade there has grown an acute and highly articulate group of critics of the orthodox interpretation of quantum theory,--the so-called "Copenhagen Interpretation." The writings of people like Bopp, Janossy, and particularly Bohm and Feyerabend, must be taken very seriously indeed. The future of some important discussions in the philosophy and the logic of science rests with these individuals. But they have, in their own writings, occasionally matched the inelegancies of Bohr and Heisenberg with as (...)
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  8. C. I. J. M. Stuart (1991). Inconsistency of the Copenhagen Interpretation. Foundations of Physics 21 (5):591-622.score: 120.0
    The Bohr-Heisenberg scheme, which forms the basis of any current version of the standard or Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics, is shown to be internally inconsistent. Although the inconsistencies demonstrated here are directly relatable to Einstein's opinion that it is unsatisfactory to interpret physical theory solely in terms of the knowledge gained from experimental outcomes, it is nevertheless shown that Einstein's view requires important modification. The implications of the Bohr-Heisenberg schem's self-inconsistency are discussed in relation to Bell's theorem (...)
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  9. Michael B. Heaney (2013). A Symmetrical Interpretation of the Klein-Gordon Equation. Foundations of Physics 43 (6):733-746.score: 108.0
    This paper presents a new Symmetrical Interpretation (SI) of relativistic quantum mechanics which postulates: quantum mechanics is a theory about complete experiments, not particles; a complete experiment is maximally described by a complex transition amplitude density; and this transition amplitude density never collapses. This SI is compared to the Copenhagen Interpretation (CI) for the analysis of Einstein’s bubble experiment. This SI makes several experimentally testable predictions that differ from the CI, solves one part of the measurement problem, (...)
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  10. Jan Faye, Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 96.0
    As the theory of the atom, quantum mechanics is perhaps the most successful theory in the history of science. It enables physicists, chemists, and technicians to calculate and predict the outcome of a vast number of experiments and to create new and advanced technology based on the insight into the behavior of atomic objects. But it is also a theory that challenges our imagination. It seems to violate some fundamental principles of classical physics, principles that eventually have become a part (...)
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  11. Michel Paty (1995). The Nature of Einstein's Objections to the Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 25 (1):183-204.score: 96.0
    In what follows, I examine three main points which may help us to understand the deep nature of Einstein's objections to quantum mechanics. After having played a fundamental pioneer role in the birth of quantum physics, Einstein was, as is well known, far less enthusiastic about its constitution as a quantum mechanics and, since 1927, he constantly argued against the pretention of its founders and proponents to have settled a definitive and complete theory. I emphasize first the importance of the (...)
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  12. Jeffrey Bub (1968). Hidden Variables and the Copenhagen Interpretation--A Reconciliation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (3):185-210.score: 90.0
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  13. Richard Schlegel (1970). Statistical Explanation in Physics: The Copenhagen Interpretation. Synthese 21 (1):65 - 82.score: 90.0
    The statistical aspects of quantum explanation are intrinsic to quantum physics; individual quantum events are created in the interactions associated with observation and are not describable by predictive theory. The superposition principle shows the essential difference between quantum and non-quantum physics, and the principle is exemplified in the classic single-photon two-slit interference experiment. Recently Mandel and Pfleegor have done an experiment somewhat similar to the optical single-photon experiment but with two independently operated lasers; interference is obtained even with beam intensity (...)
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  14. A. Sudbery (1985). Popper's Variant of the EPR Experiment Does Not Test the Copenhagen Interpretation. Philosophy of Science 52 (3):470-476.score: 90.0
  15. Henry J. Folse Jr (1974). The Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Theory and Whitehead's Philosophy of Organism. Tulane Studies in Philosophy 23:32-47.score: 90.0
  16. Reza Maleeh & Parisa Amani (2014). Pragmatism, Bohr, and the Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 27 (4):353-367.score: 90.0
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  17. Jan Faye (2010). Heisenberg's Invention of the Copenhagen Interpretation. Metascience 19 (2):239-242.score: 90.0
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  18. Wm C. McHarris (2007). Chaos Meets Quantum Mechanics: Possible Nonlinear Vindication of Einstein's Arguments: Paradoxes of the Copenhagen Interpretation: Nonlinear Parallels. Complexity 12 (4):12-18.score: 90.0
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  19. Henry Pierce Stapp (1997). The Copenhagen Interpretation. Journal of Mind and Behavior 18:127-154.score: 90.0
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  20. G. Szamosi (1993). Naturalizing the Copenhagen Interpretation. Dialectica 47 (4):305-325.score: 90.0
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  21. Peres A. Karl Popper (1999). The Copenhagen Interpretation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 33 (1):23-3.score: 90.0
     
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  22. Anto Unt (2001). The Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics and Common Sense. In. In Rein Vihalemm (ed.), Estonian Studies in the History and Philosophy of Science. Kluwer Academic Publishers. 247--262.score: 90.0
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  23. Larry Vandervert (1997). Quanta Within the Copenhagen Interpretation as Two-Neuro-Algorithm Referents. Journal of Mind and Behavior 18 (2-3).score: 90.0
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  24. Scott Tanona (2013). Decoherence and the Copenhagen Cut. Synthese 190 (16):3625-3649.score: 84.0
    While it is widely agreed that decoherence will not solve the measurement problem, decoherence has been used to explain the “emergence of classicality” and to eliminate the need for a Copenhagen edict that some systems simply have to be treated as classical via a quantum-classical “cut”. I argue that decoherence still relies on such a cut. Decoherence accounts derive classicality only in virtue of their incompleteness, by omission of part of the entangled system of which the classical-appearing subsystem is (...)
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  25. Machiel Kleemans (2010). Kristian Camilleri: Heisenberg and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics—The Physicist as Philosopher. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 40 (11):1783-1787.score: 84.0
    The book Heisenberg and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics—The Physicist as Philosopher, by Kristian Camilleri is critically reviewed. The work details Heisenberg’s philosophical development from an early positivist commitment towards a later philosophy of language. It is of interest to researchers and graduate students in the history and philosophy of quantum mechanics.
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  26. Anna Crabbe (1978). Such Stuff as Dreams Are Made on Atrick Kragelund: Dream and Prediction in the Aeneid: A Semiotic Interpretation of the Dreams of Aeneas and Turnus. (Opuscula Graecolatina 7.) Pp. 91. Copenhagen: Museum Tusculanum, 1976. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 28 (02):249-251.score: 72.0
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  27. James T. Cushing (1993). Underdetermination, Conventionalism and Realism: The Copenhagen Vs. The Bohm Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. In. In S. French & H. Kamminga (eds.), Correspondence, Invariance and Heuristics. Kluwer. 261--278.score: 72.0
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  28. Peter Bokulich (2005). Niels Bohr's Generalization of Classical Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 35 (3):347-371.score: 66.0
    We clarify Bohr’s interpretation of quantum mechanics by demonstrating the central role played by his thesis that quantum theory is a rational generalization of classical mechanics. This thesis is essential for an adequate understanding of his insistence on the indispensability of classical concepts, his account of how the quantum formalism gets its meaning, and his belief that hidden variable interpretations are impossible.
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  29. Michael Cuffaro (2010). The Kantian Framework of Complementarity. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 41 (4):309-317.score: 66.0
    A growing number of commentators have, in recent years, noted the important affinities in the views of Immanuel Kant and Niels Bohr. While these commentators are correct, the picture they present of the connections between Bohr and Kant is painted in broad strokes; it is open to the criticism that these affinities are merely superficial. In this essay, I provide a closer, structural, analysis of both Bohr's and Kant's views that makes these connections more explicit. In particular, I demonstrate the (...)
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  30. Louis Vervoort, The Concept of Probability in Physics: An Analytic Version of von Mises’ Interpretation.score: 60.0
    In the following we will investigate whether von Mises’ frequency interpretation of probability can be modified to make it philosophically acceptable. We will reject certain elements of von Mises’ theory, but retain others. In the interpretation we propose we do not use von Mises’ often criticized ‘infinite collectives’ but we retain two essential claims of his interpretation, stating that probability can only be defined for events that can be repeated in similar conditions, and that exhibit frequency stabilization. (...)
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  31. Miguel Ferrero (2003). The Information Interpretation and the Conceptual Problems of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 33 (4):665-676.score: 60.0
    It has been traditionally considered that Quantum Mechanics has two conceptual kinds of problems, namely, those related with local-realism and the so-called measurement problem. That is, the uniqueness of the result when we make a measurement. With the development of what is called generically Quantum Information Theory, a new form of the Copenhagen interpretation of the formalism has taken shape.(1) In this paper, we will analyse if this information interpretation is able to clarify these old problems. Although (...)
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  32. Stephen R. Palmquist (2013). Kantian Causality and Quantum Quarks: The Compatibility Between Quantum Mechanics and Kant's Phenomenal World. Theoria: Revista de Teoría, Historia y Fundamentos de la Ciencia 28 (77):283-302.score: 60.0
    El indeterminismo cuántico parece incompatible con la defensa de la causalidad que hace Kant en su Segunda Analogía. La interpretación de Copenhague de la mecánica cuántica también considera a esta teoría como evidencia, a favor del antirealismo. Este articulo defiende que la ley (trascendental) de la causalidad se aplica solamente al mundo en tanto que observable, y no a objetos hipotéticos (inobservables) como los quarks, detectables solo mediante aceleradores de altas energías. Tomar la constante de Planck y la velocidad de (...)
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  33. Arthur Jabs (1992). An Interpretation of the Formalism of Quantum Mechanics in Terms of Epistemological Realism. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (3):405-421.score: 48.0
    We present an alternative to the Copenhagen interpretation of the formalism of nonrelativistic quantum mechanics. The basic difference is that the new interpretation is formulated in the language of epistemological realism. It involves a change in some basic physical concepts. Elementary particles are considered as extended objects and nonlocal effects are included. The role of the new concepts in the problems of measurement and of the Einstein–Podolsky–Rosen correlations is described. Experiments to distinguish the proposed interpretation from (...)
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  34. John G. Cramer (1986). The Transactional Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Reviews of Modern Physics 58 (3):647-687.score: 48.0
    Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics deals with these problems is reviewed. A new interpretation of the formalism of quantum mechanics, the transactional interpretation, is presented. The basic element of this interpretation is the transaction describing a quantum event as an exchange of advanced and retarded waves, as implied by the work of Wheeler and Feynman, Dirac, and others. The transactional interpretation is explicitly nonlocal and thereby consistent with recent tests of the Bell inequality, yet (...)
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  35. John Cramer, A Farewell to Copenhagen?score: 48.0
    This column is about experimental tests of the various interpretations of quantum mechanics. The question at issue is whether we can perform experiments that can show whether there is an "observer-created reality" as suggested by the Copenhagen Interpretation, or a peacock’s tail of rapidly branching alternate universes, as suggested by the Many-Worlds Interpretation, or forward-backward in time handshakes, as suggested by the Transactional Interpretation? Until recently, I would have said that this was an impossible task, but (...)
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  36. John G. Cramer (1988). An Overview of the Transactional Interpretation. International Journal of Theoretical Physics 27 (227):1-5.score: 48.0
    The transactional interpretation of quantum mechanics is summarized and various points concerning the transactional interpretation and its relation to the Copenhagen interpretation are considered. Questions concerning mapping the transactional interpretation onto the Copenhagen interpretation, of advanced waves as solutions to proper wave equations, of collapse and the quantum formalism, and of the relation of quantum mechanical interpretations to experimental tests and results are discussed.
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  37. A. A. Pechenkin (2002). Mandelstam's Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics in Comparative Perspective. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 16 (3):265 – 284.score: 48.0
    In his 1939 Lectures, the prominent Soviet physicist L. I. Mandelstam proposed an interpretation of quantum mechanics that was understood in different ways. To assess Mandelstam's interpretation, we classify contemporary interpretations of quantum mechanics and compare his interpretation with others developed in the 1930s (the Copenhagen interpretation and the statistical interpretations proposed by K. R. Popper, H. Margenau, and E. C. Kemble). We conclude that Mandelstam's interpretation belongs to the family of minimal statistical interpretations (...)
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  38. Mara Beller (1996). The Rhetoric of Antirealism and the Copenhagen Spirit. Philosophy of Science 63 (2):183-204.score: 48.0
    This paper argues against the possibility of presenting a consistent version of the Copenhagen Interpretation of Quantum Physics, characterizing its founders' philosophical pronouncements including those on the realism-antirealism issue, as a contingent collection of local, often contradictory, moves in changing theoretical and sociopolitical circumstances. The paper analyzes the fundamental differences of opinion between Bohr and the mathematical physicists, Heisenberg and Born, concerning the foundational doctrine of the "indispensability of classical concepts", and their related disagreements on "quantum reality." The (...)
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  39. Charles E. Engelke (1986). The Effect of Localization on Interference. II. Bearing on Locality Violation and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 16 (9):917-921.score: 48.0
    In a two-channel interference experiment such as that considered in the preceding companion paper, a quantum may be localizable predominantly in one channel by a time-coincident experiment on a correlated quantum. The Copenhagen interpretation of quantum mechanics then requires a coincidence intensity prediction having the same reduced interference between channels as if the probability amplitude in the other channel had been attenuated by a filter. The quantum mechanical treatment of correlated systems originated by von Neumann does predict this (...)
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  40. Roland Omnès (1995). A New Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics and its Consequences in Epistemology. Foundations of Physics 25 (4):605-629.score: 48.0
    A rather recent interpretation of quantum mechanics, known under the various names of consistent histories, decohering histories, or logical interpretation, has brought interpretation into a standard deductive theory and is now investigated in many places. A key difference with the Copenhagen interpretation is the status of classical physics, now derived completely from quantum principles in both its dynamical and logical aspects. After describing briefly this new interpretation in its essentials, leaving aside technical details, it (...)
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  41. D. N. (2003). Copenhagen Computation. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 34 (3):511-522.score: 48.0
    I describe a pedagogical scheme devised to teach efficiently to computer scientists just enough quantum mechanics to permit them to understand the theoretical developments of the last decade going under the name of ''quantum computation.'' I then note that my offbeat approach to quantum mechanics, designed to be maximally efficacious for this specific educational purpose, is nothing other than the Copenhagen interpretation.
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  42. I. Schmelzer (2011). Pure Quantum Interpretations Are Not Viable. Foundations of Physics 41 (2):159-177.score: 48.0
    Pure interpretations of quantum theory, which throw away the classical part of the Copenhagen interpretation without adding new structure to its quantum part, are not viable. This is a consequence of a non-uniqueness result for the canonical operators.
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  43. D. Dieks (1989). Quantum Mechanics Without the Projection Postulate and its Realistic Interpretation. Foundations of Physics 19 (11):1397-1423.score: 48.0
    It is widely held that quantum mechanics is the first scientific theory to present scientifically internal, fundamental difficulties for a realistic interpretation (in the philosophical sense). The standard (Copenhagen) interpretation of the quantum theory is often described as the inevitable instrumentalistic response. It is the purpose of the present article to argue that quantum theory doesnot present fundamental new problems to a realistic interpretation. The formalism of quantum theory has the same states—it will be argued—as the (...)
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  44. Fritz Rohrlich (1987). Schrödinger and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. Foundations of Physics 17 (12):1205-1220.score: 48.0
    On the occasion of the centennial of his birth, Schrödinger's life and views are sketched and his critique of the interpretation of quantum mechanics accepted at his time is examined. His own interpretation, which he had to abandon after a short time, provides a prime example of the way in which the tentative meaning of central theoretical terms in a new and revolutionary theory often fails. Schrödinger's strong philosophical convictions have played a key role in his refusal to (...)
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  45. Emilio Santos (1991). Interpretation of the Quantum Formalism and Bell's Theorem. Foundations of Physics 21 (2):221-241.score: 48.0
    It is argued that quantum mechanics must be interpreted according to the Copenhagen interpretation. Consequently the formalism must be used in a purely operational way. The relation between realism, hidden variables, and the Bell inequalities is discussed. The proof of impossibility of local hidden-variables theories (Bell's theorem) is criticized on the basis that the quantum mechanical states violating local realism are not physically realizable states.“Einstein had great difficulty in reaching a sharp formulation of Bohr's meaning. What hope then (...)
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  46. C. F. Von Weizsäcker & Th Görnitz (1991). Quantum-Realistic Interpretation. Foundations of Physics 21 (3):311-321.score: 48.0
    1. Realism. Physicists claim rightly to speak about reality. But what does “reality” mean?2. The Copenhagen Interpretation (CI). We consider CI as a minimal semantics for quantum theory, leaving ways open for additional interpretation.3. The Measuring Process. Several interpretations of the process as given in the liteature are discussed.4. Realistic Interpretation. Discussion of the de Broglie-Bohm-Bell interpretation. If well formulated, it is not a necessary consequence of quantum theory but cannot be excluded.
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  47. Slobodan Perovic (2006). Schrödinger's Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics and the Relevance of Bohr's Experimental Critique. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 37 (2):275-297.score: 42.0
    E. Schrödinger's ideas on interpreting quantum mechanics have been recently re-examined by historians and revived by philosophers of quantum mechanics. Such recent re-evaluations have focused on Schrödinger's retention of space–time continuity and his relinquishment of the corpuscularian understanding of microphysical systems. Several of these historical re-examinations claim that Schrödinger refrained from pursuing his 1926 wave-mechanical interpretation of quantum mechanics under pressure from the Copenhagen and Göttingen physicists, who misinterpreted his ideas in their dogmatic pursuit of the complementarity doctrine (...)
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  48. Gary M. Hardegree (1976). The Modal Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1976:82 - 103.score: 42.0
    This paper presents a general formal semantic scheme for the interpretation of quantum mechanics, in terms of which van Fraassen's Copenhagen and anti-Copenhagen variants of the modal interpretation are examined. The general character of the modal interpretation is motivated in a discussion of classical statistical mechanics, the distinction being made between statistical states and micro-states. The notion of a quasi-classical (micro) state is introduced in a discussion of the theorem of Gleason and Kochen and Specker. (...)
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  49. Bas C. Fraassen (1979). Hidden Variables and the Modal Interpretation of Quantum Theory. Synthese 42 (1):155 - 165.score: 42.0
    The modal interpretation of quantum mechanics has two variants: the Copenhagen variant (CV) and the anti-Copenhagen variant (ACV). Healey uses the Bell-Wigner locality condition to criticize the latter, which I do not advocate. 2 The conclusions of Healey's admirably written article are therefore welcome to me. But if I had wished to advocate the ACV, I do not think that his arguments would have dissuaded me. Specifically, as I shall explain, we should distinguish between Physical Locality and (...)
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  50. J. Acacio de Barros, J. P. R. F. de Mendonça & N. Pinto-Neto (2007). Realism in Energy Transition Processes: An Example From Bohmian Quantum Mechanics. Synthese 154 (3):349-370.score: 42.0
    In this paper we study in details a system of two weakly coupled harmonic oscillators from the point of view of Bohm’s interpretation of quantum mechanics. This system may be viewed as a simple model for the interaction between a photon and a photodetector. We obtain exact solutions for the general case. We then compute approximate solutions for the case where one oscillator is initially in its first excited state (a single photon) reaching the other oscillator in its ground (...)
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