Search results for 'Corey McGrath' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Corey McGrath (2011). Can Substitution Inferences Explain the Knobe Effect? Review of Philosophy and Psychology 2 (4):667-679.score: 80.0
    The Knobe effect is the phenomenon demonstrated in the course of repeated studies showing that moral valence affects the way in which we apply concepts. Knobe explains the effect by appealing to the nature of the concepts themselves: whether they actually apply in some situation depends upon the moral valence of some element of that situation. In this paper, a different picture of the effect is presented and given motivation. It is suggested that subjects apply concepts on the basis of (...)
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  2. Matthew McGrath (1998). Matthew McGrath. Philosophy 74:587-610.score: 60.0
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  3. Sarah McGrath (2011). Reply to King. Journal of Philosophical Research 36:235-241.score: 20.0
    In “Moral Disagreement and Moral Expertise” (2007), I offer an argument for the conclusion that our controversial moral beliefs do not amount to knowledge. In this paper, I defend that argument against the criticisms put forth by Nathan King in his “McGrath on Moral Knowledge.”.
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  4. Jeremy Fantl & Matthew McGrath (2009). Knowledge in an Uncertain World. Oxford University Press.score: 20.0
    Knowledge in an Uncertain World is an exploration of the relation between knowledge, reasons, and justification. According to the primary argument of the book, you can rely on what you know in action and belief, because what you know can be a reason you have and you can rely on the reasons you have. If knowledge doesn't allow for a chance of error, then this result is unsurprising. But if knowledge does allow for a chance of error--as seems required if (...)
     
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  5. Matthew McGrath (2000). Between Deflationism & Correspondence Theory. Garland Pub..score: 20.0
    McGrath argues for an original theory truth that combines elements of two well-known philosophical theories--deflationism and correspondence.
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  6. John McGrath (2012). Befriending Context and Tradition: Evangelisation and Catholic Schools. Australasian Catholic Record, The 89 (3):283.score: 20.0
    McGrath, John The Church 'exists to evangelise'. It is its essential mission. Catholic schooling in Australia professes its enthusiasm for being 'part of the evangelising mission of the Church'. It always has. However, the call to renewed ways of evangelisation in new and diverse circumstances gives rise to a number of questions: How should schools respond to new contexts? What principles should underpin their evangelising efforts? What are some of the renewed ways by which school systems strive to meet (...)
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  7. Matthew McGrath (2013). Between Deflationism and Correspondence Theory. Routledge.score: 20.0
    McGrath argues for an original truth theory that combines elements of two well-known philosophical theories--deflationism and correspondence.
     
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  8. Sarah McGrath (2004). Moral Knowledge by Perception. Philosophical Perspectives 18 (1):209–228.score: 10.0
    On the face of it, some of our knowledge is of moral facts (for example, that this promise should not be broken in these circumstances), and some of it is of non-moral facts (for example, that the kettle has just boiled). But, some argue, there is reason to believe that we do not, after all, know any moral facts. For example, according to J. L. Mackie, if we had moral knowledge (‘‘if we were aware of [objective values]’’), ‘‘it would have (...)
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  9. Sarah McGrath (2007). Moral Disagreement and Moral Expertise. In Russ Shafer-Landau (ed.), Oxford Studies in Metaethics Vol. 4. Oxford University Press. 87-108.score: 10.0
    The phenomenon of persistent ethical disagreement is often cited in connection with the question of whether there is any ‘‘absolute’’ morality, or whether, instead, morality is in some sense merely ‘‘a matter of personal opinion’’. Citing disagreement, many people who hold strong views about controversial issues such as the permissibility of abortion, eating meat, or the death penalty deny that these views are anything more than ‘‘personal beliefs’’. But while there might be inconsistencies lurking in this position, it is not (...)
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  10. Thomas Kelly & Sarah McGrath (2010). Is Reflective Equilibrium Enough? Philosophical Perspectives 24 (1):325-359.score: 10.0
    Suppose that one is at least a minimal realist about a given domain, in that one thinks that that domain contains truths that are not in any interesting sense of our own making. Given such an understanding, what can be said for and against the method of reflective equilibrium as a procedure for investigating the domain? One fact that lends this question some interest is that many philosophers do combine commitments to minimal realism and a reflective equilibrium methodology. Here, for (...)
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  11. Sarah McGrath (2011). Skepticism About Moral Expertise as a Puzzle for Moral Realism. Journal of Philosophy 108 (3):111-137.score: 10.0
    In this paper, I develop a neglected puzzle for the moral realist. I then canvass some potential responses. Although I endorse one response as the most promising of those I survey, my primary goal is to make vivid how formidable the puzzle is, as opposed to offering a definitive solution.
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  12. Sarah McGrath (2005). Causation by Omission: A Dilemma. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 123 (1-2):125--48.score: 10.0
    Some omissions seem to be causes. For example, suppose Barry promises to water Alice’s plant, doesn’t water it, and that the plant then dries up and dies. Barry’s not watering the plant – his omitting to water the plant – caused its death. But there is reason to believe that if omissions are ever causes, then there is far more causation by omission than we ordinarily think. In other words, there is reason to think the following thesis true.
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  13. Jeremy Fantl & Matthew McGrath (2002). Evidence, Pragmatics, and Justification. Philosophical Review 111 (1):67-94.score: 10.0
  14. Matthew McGrath (2013). Dogmatism, Underminers and Skepticism. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 86 (3):533-562.score: 10.0
  15. Jeremy Fantl & Matthew Mcgrath (2007). On Pragmatic Encroachment in Epistemology. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 75 (3):558–589.score: 10.0
    We argue, contrary to epistemological orthodoxy, that knowledge is not purely epistemic -- that knowledge is not simply a matter of truth-related factors (evidence, reliability, etc.). We do this by arguing for a pragmatic condition on knowledge, KA: if a subject knows that p, then she is rational to act as if p. KA, together with fallibilism, entails that knowledge is not purely epistemic. We support KA by appealing tothe role of knowledge-citations in defending and criticizing actions, and by giving (...)
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  16. Sarah McGrath, Ethics And.score: 10.0
    We pretend that philosophical problems divide into the various subfields of philosophy, but to take this pretense too seriously is a mistake. Philosophical problems often raise issues within more than one subfield, and require knowledge of and insights from several subfields. To pretend that ethical questions can be pursued in isolation from the rest of philosophy would be to miss out on a great deal. This course will highlight some recent, cutting—edge work on problems at the overlap of ethics and (...)
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  17. Matthew McGrath (2008). Conciliatory Metaontology and the Vindication of Common Sense. Noûs 42 (3):482-508.score: 10.0
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  18. Jeremy Fantl & Matthew McGrath (2009). Critical Study of John Hawthorne's Knowledge and Lotteries and Jason Stanley's Knowledge and Practical Interests. [REVIEW] Noûs 43 (1):178-192.score: 10.0
  19. Matthew McGrath (2007). Memory and Epistemic Conservatism. Synthese 157 (1):1 - 24.score: 10.0
    Much of the plausibility of epistemic conservatism derives from its prospects of explaining our rationality in holding memory beliefs. In the first two parts of this paper, I argue for the inadequacy of the two standard approaches to the epistemology of memory beliefs, preservationism and evidentialism. In the third, I point out the advantages of the conservative approach and consider how well conservatism survives three of the strongest objections against it. Conservatism does survive, I claim, but only if qualified in (...)
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  20. Jeremy Fantl & Matthew McGrath (2009). Advice for Fallibilists: Put Knowledge to Work. Philosophical Studies 142 (1):55 - 66.score: 10.0
    We begin by asking what fallibilism about knowledge is, distinguishing several conceptions of fallibilism and giving reason to accept what we call strong epistemic fallibilism, the view that one can know that something is the case even if there remains an epistemic chance, for one, that it is not the case. The task of the paper, then, concerns how best to defend this sort of fallibilism from the objection that it is “mad,” that it licenses absurd claims such as “I (...)
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  21. Sarah McGrath (2009). The Puzzle of Pure Moral Deference1. Philosophical Perspectives 23 (1):321-344.score: 10.0
    Case B. You tell me that eating meat is immoral. Although I believe that, left to my own devices, I would not think this, no matter how long I reflected, I adopt your attitude as my own. It is not that I believe that you are better informed about potentially relevant non-moral facts (e.g., about the conditions under which livestock is kept, or about the typical effects of eliminating meat from one’s diet). On the contrary, I know that I have (...)
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  22. Sarah Mcgrath (2006). Organ Procurement, Altruism, and Autonomy. Journal of Value Inquiry 40 (2-3):297-309.score: 10.0
  23. Matthew McGrath (2005). No Objects, No Problem? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 83 (4):457 – 486.score: 10.0
    One familiar form of argument for rejecting entities of a certain kind is that, by rejecting them, we avoid certain difficult problems associated with them. Such problem-avoidance arguments backfire if the problems cited survive the elimination of the rejected entities. In particular, we examine one way problems can survive: a question for the realist about which of a set of inconsistent statements is false may give way to an equally difficult question for the eliminativist about which of a set of (...)
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  24. James H. McGrath (1986). Quantum Disjunctive Facts. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1986:76 - 86.score: 10.0
    A reformulation of the Kochen and Specker Theorem is used to show how quantum disjunctive facts have presented an insurmountable obstacle to mainstream attempts to motivate quantum logic. The failure of these attempts represents a progressive retrenchment of the program of connecting quantum logic to quantum theory. However, a recent program proposed by Allen Stairs gives those who embrace a realist ontology of quantum "facts" reason to believe quantum logic may yet be read off quantum theory.
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  25. M. McGrath (2011). Truth and Words, by Gary Ebbs. Mind 120 (478):520-527.score: 10.0
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  26. Matthew McGrath (2007). Temporal Parts. Philosophy Compass 2 (5):730–748.score: 10.0
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  27. Matthew McGrath (2003). Deflationism and the Normativity of Truth. Philosophical Studies 112 (1):47 - 67.score: 10.0
    This paper argues, in response to Huw Price, that deflationism has the resources to account for the normativity of truth. The discussion centers on a principle of hyper-objective assertibility, that one is incorrect to assert that p if not-p. If this principle doesn't state a fact about truth, it neednt be explained by deflationists. If it does,, it can be explained.
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  28. Matthew McGrath (2013). Siegel and the Impact for Epistemological Internalism. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):723-732.score: 10.0
  29. Jeremy Fantl & Matthew Mcgrath (2012). Contextualism and Subject-Sensitivity. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 84 (3):693-702.score: 10.0
    Contribution to a symposium on Keith DeRose's book, The Case for Contextualism: Knowledge, Skepticism, and Context.
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  30. Sarah McGrath (2003). Causation and the Making/Allowing Distinction. Philosophical Studies 114 (1-2):81 - 106.score: 10.0
    Throw: Harry throws a stone at Dick, hitting him. Intuitively, there is a moral difference between the first and the second case of each of these pairs.1 In the second case, the agent’s behavior is morally worse than his behavior in the first case. But in each pair, the agent’s behavior has the same outcome: in No Check and Shoot, the outcome is that a child dies, and Jim saves $40; in No Catch and Throw, the outcome is that Dick (...)
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  31. Matthew McGrath (2004). Review: The Correspondence Theory of Truth: An Essay on the Metaphysics of Predication. [REVIEW] Mind 113 (450):379-383.score: 10.0
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  32. Matthew McGrath (2003). What the Deflationist May Say About Truthmaking. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 66 (3):666–688.score: 10.0
    The correspondence theory of truth is often thought to be supported by the intuition that if a proposition (sentence, belief) is true, then something makes it true. I argue that this appearance is illusory and is sustained only by a conflation of two distinct notions of truthmaking, existential and non-existential. Once the conflation is exposed, I maintain, deflationism is seen to be adequate for accommodating truthmaking intuitions.
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  33. Pam McGrath (1998). Autonomy, Discourse, and Power: A Postmodern Reflection on Principlism and Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 23 (5):516 – 532.score: 10.0
    In recent years there has been an increasing critique of the philosophically based reasoning in bioethics which is known as principlism. This article seeks to make a postmodern contribution to this emerging debate by using notions of power and discourse to highlight the limits and superficiality of this , rationalistic mode of reflection. The focus of the discussion will be on the principle of autonomy. Recent doctoral research on a hospice organization (Karuna Hospice Service) will be used to contextualize the (...)
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  34. S. J. McGrath (2006). Boehme, Hegel, Schelling, and the Hermetic Theology of Evil. Philosophy and Theology 18 (2):257-286.score: 10.0
    Building on recent research exposing Hegel’s debt to esoteric Christianity (both Gnostic and Hermetic traditions), the aim of this paper is to show how Hegel and Schelling resolve an ambiguity in Boehme’s theology of evil in opposing ways. Jacob Boehme’s notion of the individuation of God through the overcoming ofopposition is the central paradigm for both Hegel’s and Schelling’s understanding of the role of evil in the life of God. Boehme remains ambiguous on the question of the modality of evil: (...)
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  35. Matthew McGrath, Propositions. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 10.0
  36. S. J. McGrath (2010). Schelling on the Unconscious. Research in Phenomenology 40 (1):72-91.score: 10.0
  37. Matthew McGrath (1998). Van Inwagen's Critique of Universalism. Analysis 58 (2):116–121.score: 10.0
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  38. Matthew McGrath (1997). Weak Deflationism. Mind 106 (421):69-98.score: 10.0
    Is truth a substantial feature of truth-bearers? Correspondence theorists answer in the affirmative, deflationists in the negative. Correspondence theorists cite in their defense the dependence of truth on meaning or representational content. Deflationists in turn cite the conceptual centrality of simple equivalences such as ''Snow is white' is true iff snow is white'' and 'It is true that snow is white iff snow is white'. The apparent facts to which these theorists appeal correspond to some of our firmest and most (...)
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  39. P. J. McGrath (1987). Atheism or Agnosticism. Analysis 47 (1):54 - 57.score: 10.0
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  40. Matthew McGrath (1998). Quasi-Realism and the Humean Defense of Normative Non-Factualism. Philosophical Studies 90 (2):113-127.score: 10.0
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  41. Matthew McGrath (1998). The Concrete Modal Realist Challenge to Platonism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (4):587 – 610.score: 10.0
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  42. Elizabeth McGrath (1983). 'The Drunken Alcibiades': Rubens's Picture of Plato's Symposium. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 46:228-235.score: 10.0
  43. Jeremy Fantl & Matthew Mcgrath (2012). Précis of Knowledge in an Uncertain World. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (2):441-446.score: 10.0
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  44. Gerald Corey, George T. Williams & Mary E. Moline (1995). Ethical and Legal Issues in Group Counseling. Ethics and Behavior 5 (2):161 – 183.score: 10.0
    Legal and ethical issues involved in group work are reviewed and discussed. Variations in different professional ethics codes are discussed. Recommendations for consideration by group leaders are made.
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  45. Jeremy Fantl & Matthew Mcgrath (2012). Replies to Cohen, Neta and Reed. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 85 (2):473-490.score: 10.0
  46. Matthew McGrath (2010). Contextualism and Intellectualism. Philosophical Perspectives 24 (1):383-405.score: 10.0
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  47. Elizabeth McGrath (2002). Ludovico Il Moro and His Moors. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 65:67-94.score: 10.0
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  48. P. J. McGrath (1988). The Inverse Gambler's Fallacy and Cosmology--A Reply to Hacking. Mind 97 (386):265-268.score: 10.0
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  49. Jeremy Fantl Æ Matthew McGrath, Advice for Fallibilists: Put Knowledge to Work.score: 10.0
    Abstract We begin by asking what fallibilism about knowledge is, distinguishing several conceptions of fallibilism and giving reason to accept what we call strong epistemic fallibilism, the view that one can know that something is the case even if there remains an epistemic chance, for one, that it is not the case. The task of the paper, then, concerns how best to defend this sort of fallibilism from the objection that it is ‘‘mad,’’ that it licenses absurd claims such as (...)
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  50. Elizabeth Corey (2009). Religion and the Mode of Practice in Michael Oakeshott. Zygon 44 (1):139-151.score: 10.0
    Michael Oakeshott's religious view of the world stands behind much of his political and philosophical writing. In this essay I first discuss Oakeshott's view of religion and the mode of practice in his own terms. I attempt next to illuminate his idea of religion by describing it in less technical language, drawing upon other thinkers such as Georg Simmel and George Santayana, who share similar views. I then evaluate Oakeshott's view as a whole, considering whether his ideas about religion can (...)
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