Search results for 'Corie Hammers' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  15
    Corie Hammers & I. I. I. Alan D. Brown (2004). Towards a Feminist–Queer Alliance: A Paradigmatic Shift in the Research Process. Social Epistemology 18 (1):85-101.
  2.  58
    Corie Hammers & I. I. I. Brown (2004). Towards a Feminist-Queer Alliance: A Paradigmatic Shift in the Research Process. Social Epistemology 18 (1):85 – 101.
    Building on the advances made by feminist reconsiderations of methods, methodology and epistemology, this paper calls for an alliance between feminist social science and the emerging field of queer theory. By challenging traditional scientific approaches to research on sexual minority groups, a distinctly 'queer' approach is advocated that adopts a reflexive position on subjectivity and sexuality. While essentialist approaches privilege gay/lesbian, man/woman, and object/subject, this approach advances a framework of critical sexualities that moves social science into an arena of inclusivity (...)
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  3.  22
    Margaret Eisenhart (2005). Hammers and Saws for the Improvement of Educational Research. Educational Theory 55 (3):245-261.
    This article examines different conceptions of causation and their implications for understanding educational phenomena and conducting educational research. Specifically, I discuss four research designs for pursuing questions about causation in education. Two of these research designs take a variance approach to causation , while the other two take a process approach . The point of the discussion is to illustrate, first, their respective strengths and, second, their necessary interdependence. Ultimately, I argue that just as both hammers and saws are (...)
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  4. H. Greely (2011). Of Nails and Hammers: Human Biological Enhancement and US Policy Tools. In Guy Kahane, Julian Savulescu & Ruud Ter Meulen (eds.), Enhancing Human Capacities. 653--675.
     
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  5.  34
    Stephan Käufer (2003). Schemata, Hammers, and Time: Heidegger's Two Derivations of Judgment. [REVIEW] Topoi 22 (1):79-91.
    In his Kant interpretations of the late 1920s and in Being and Time, Heidegger develops two distinct, yet related, derivations of the possibility of judgment from temporal conditions. This paper presents each derivation, establishes the strict analogy between the two, and uses it to explain the structure and shortcoming of the interpretation of ecstatic temporality as the unitary ground of objective experience.
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  6.  4
    Siegfried Albert (1988). Axe-Hammers and Axes in Central Western Germany II. Philosophy and History 21 (1):91-92.
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  7.  7
    David Hutchins (2012). Hammers, Nails, Sealing Wax, String and Gunpowder! AI and Society 27 (3):363-368.
    Starting from experience of working with Japanese Quality Gurus, and decades of industrial consultancy, this article addresses the fundamental principles of the Quality Movement and suggests ways forward for Quality as empowerment, led from education. Quality Circles, empowering workers, and Students’ Quality Circles, empowering students, provide a starting point for educational, economic and social innovation.
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  8. James A. Moore & Arthur S. Keene (1983). Archaeological Hammers and Theories. Academic Press,1983.
     
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  9.  23
    Yuk Hui (2012). What is a Digital Object? Metaphilosophy 43 (4):380-395.
    We find ourselves in a media-intensive milieu comprising networks, images, sounds, and text, which we generalize as data and metadata. How can we understand this digital milieu and make sense of these data, not only focusing on their functionalities but also reflecting on our everyday life and existence? How do these material constructions demand a new philosophical understanding? Instead of following the reductionist approaches, which understand the digital milieu as abstract entities such as information and data, this article proposes to (...)
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  10. Paul Pietroski (2000). Mental Causation for Dualists. Mind and Language 9 (3):336-366.
    The philosophical problem of mental causation concerns a clash between commonsense and scientific views about the causation of human behaviour. On the one hand, commonsense suggests that our actions are caused by our mental states—our thoughts, intentions, beliefs and so on. On the other hand, neuroscience assumes that all bodily movements are caused by neurochemical events. It is implausible to suppose that our actions are causally overdetermined in the same way that the ringing of a bell may be overdetermined by (...)
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  11.  69
    Graham Harman (2011). The Road to Objects. Continent 3 (1):171-179.
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
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  12.  42
    Judith Grant (1996). Bring the Noise: Hypermasculinity in Heavy Metal and Rap. Journal of Social Philosophy 27 (2):5-31.
    “The Subliminal K i d moved in and took over bars cafes and jukeboxes of the world cities and installed radio transmitters and microphones in each bar so that the music and talk of any bar could be heard in all his bars and he had tape recorders in each bar that played and recorded at arbitrary intervals and his agents moved back and forth with portable tape recorders and brought back street sound and talk and music and poured it (...)
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  13.  16
    Stefano Borgo, Noemi Spagnoletti, Laure Vieu & Elisabetta Visalberghi (2013). Artifact and Artifact Categorization: Comparing Humans and Capuchin Monkeys. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (3):375-389.
    We aim to show that far-related primates like humans and the capuchin monkeys show interesting correspondences in terms of artifact characterization and categorization. We investigate this issue by using a philosophically-inspired definition of physical artifact which, developed for human artifacts, turns out to be applicable for cross-species comparison. In this approach an artifact is created when an entity is intentionally selected and some capacities attributed to it (often characterizing a purpose). Behavioral studies suggest that this notion of artifact is not (...)
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  14.  15
    N. L. Wilson (1972). What Exactlyis English? Journal of Philosophical Logic 1 (2):170 - 183.
    I wish now to return to the elementary characterization of languagehood in section III and its rationalization in section IV and say something by way of conclusion. The account given may or may not have a large number of fascinating and important consequences, but I shall confine myself to a couple of minor points and one not so minor.Let us suppose that there are either an infinite number of extra-linguistic entities (which seems plausible) or an infinite number of possible expressions (...)
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  15.  8
    David West (1975). Lucretius' Methods of Argument (3.417–614). Classical Quarterly 25 (01):94-.
    A states the phenomenon that requires to be explained. B explains it. C justifies B. D is the furthest reach of the argument and explains C. E. begins the way back, stating the consequence of D and therefore balancing C. F is the inference from E and corresponds to B, and G brings us back to A. The logic is closely knit. And it is pointed by repeats and correspondences. In A the fire is liquidus; in E profundant, in F (...)
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  16. Peter Menzies, Mental Causation for Event Dualists Peter Menzies#.
    The philosophical problem of mental causation concerns a clash between commonsense and scientific views about the causation of human behaviour. On the one hand, commonsense suggests that our actions are caused by our mental states—our thoughts, intentions, beliefs and so on. On the other hand, neuroscience assumes that all bodily movements are caused by neurochemical events. It is implausible to suppose that our actions are causally overdetermined in the same way that the ringing of a bell may be overdetermined by (...)
     
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  17.  3
    Alan Gewirth (1963). Meanings and Criteria in Ethics. Philosophy 38 (146):329 - 345.
    In Recent years noncognitivist ethical theories have been supported by an argument which has come to be widely accepted among moral philosophers.1 According to this argument, an ethical term like ‘good’ has both a commending function and a describing function, but between these functions there is the important difference that the commending function alone is invariant while the describing function varies greatly. For many and different things may be called good—hammers, sunsets, paintings, missionaries, cannibals—but despite these differences in the (...)
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