Search results for 'Corinne Zimmerman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  73 DLs
    Michael R. W. Dawson & Corinne Zimmerman (2003). Interpreting the Internal Structure of a Connectionist Model of the Balance Scale Task. Brain and Mind 4 (2):129-149.score: 241.8
    One new tradition that has emerged from early research on autonomous robots is embodied cognitive science. This paper describes the relationship between embodied cognitive science and a related tradition, synthetic psychology. It is argued that while both are synthetic, embodied cognitive science is antirepresentational while synthetic psychology still appeals to representations. It is further argued that modern connectionism offers a medium for conducting synthetic psychology, provided that researchers analyze the internal representations that their networks develop. The paper then provides a (...)
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  2.  4 DLs
    Jean E. Pretz & Corinne Zimmerman (2011). When the Goal Gets in the Way: The Interaction of Goal Specificity and Task Difficulty. Thinking and Reasoning 15 (4):405-430.score: 240.1
    In three experiments we tested hypotheses derived from the goal specificity literature using a real-world physics task. In the balance-scale paradigm participants predict the state of the apparatus based on a configuration of weights at various distances from the fulcrum. Non-specific goals (NSG) have been shown to encourage hypothesis testing, which facilitates rule discovery, whereas specific goals (SG) do not. We showed that this goal specificity effect depends on task difficulty. The NSG strategy led to rule induction among some participants. (...)
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  3.  1 DLs
    Gilbert Clark & Enid Zimmerman (forthcoming). The Influence of Theoretical Frameworks on Clark and Zimmerman's Research About Art Talent Development. Journal of Aesthetic Education 31 (4).score: 180.0
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  4.  58 DLs
    Aaron Zimmerman (2010). Moral Epistemology. Routledge.score: 60.3
    How do we know right from wrong? Do we even have moral knowledge? Moral epistemology studies these and related questions about our understanding of virtue and vice. It is one of philosophy’s perennial problems, reaching back to Plato, Aristotle, Aquinas, Locke, Hume and Kant, and has recently been the subject of intense debate as a result of findings in developmental and social psychology. Throughout the book Zimmerman argues that our belief in moral knowledge can survive sceptical challenges. He also (...)
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  5.  42 DLs
    Dean Zimmerman & Penelope Mackie (2011). Mind-Body Dualism. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111:181 - 199.score: 60.3
    I attempt to rebut Dean Zimmerman's novel argument (2010), which he presents in support of substance dualism, for the conclusion that, in spite of its popularity, the combination of property dualism with substance materialism represents a precarious position in the philosophy of mind. I take issue with Zimmerman's contention that the vagueness of 'garden variety' material objects such as brains or bodies makes them unsuitable candidates for the possession of phenomenal properties. I also argue that the 'speculative materialism' (...)
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  6.  14 DLs
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2014). Ignorance and Moral Obligation. OUP Oxford.score: 60.1
    Michael J. Zimmerman explores whether and how our ignorance about ourselves and our circumstances affects what our moral obligations and moral rights are. He rejects objective and subjective views of the nature of moral obligation, and presents a new case for a 'prospective' view.
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  7.  7 DLs
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2008). Living with Uncertainty: The Moral Significance of Ignorance. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Every choice we make is set against a background of massive ignorance about our past, our future, our circumstances, and ourselves. Philosophers are divided on the moral significance of such ignorance. Some say that it has a direct impact on how we ought to behave - the question of what our moral obligations are; others deny this, claiming that it only affects how we ought to be judged in light of the behaviour in which we choose to engage - the (...)
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  8.  3 DLs
    Peter Van Inwagen & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.) (2008). Metaphysics: The Big Questions. Blackwell Pub..score: 60.0
     
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  9.  3 DLs
    Yvonne C. Zimmerman (2013). Other Dreams of Freedom: Religion, Sex, and Human Trafficking. OUP Usa.score: 60.0
    Yvonne C. Zimmerman offers a groundbreaking exploration of the relationship between freedom and sexual regulation in American approaches to human trafficking.
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  10.  0 DLs
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2011). The Immorality of Punishment. Broadview Press.score: 60.0
    It is hard to imagine a state functioning at all, let alone well, without having recourse to punishing those who break its laws. In The Immorality of Punishment, Michael Zimmerman argues not merely that our current practice of punishment is deplorable but that legal punishment itself is wrong, no matter its form. This astounding thesis is defended firstly by a sustained and compelling attack on the alternatives. Punishment is not justified by its role as a deterrent, because qua deterrent, (...)
     
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  11.  534 DLs
    Michael J. Loux & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.) (2003). The Oxford Handbook of Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.score: 31.6
    The Oxford Handbook of Metaphysics offers the most authoritative and compelling guide to this diverse and fertile field of philosophy. Twenty-four of the world's most distinguished specialists provide brand-new essays about 'what there is': what kinds of things there are, and what relations hold among entities falling under various categories. They give the latest word on such topics as identity, modality, time, causation, persons and minds, freedom, and vagueness. The Handbook's unrivaled breadth and depth make it the definitive reference work (...)
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  12.  291 DLs
    Dean Zimmerman (2010). From Property Dualism to Substance Dualism. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 84 (1):119 - 150.score: 30.9
    Property dualism is enjoying a slight resurgence in popularity, these days; substance dualism, not so much. But it is not as easy as one might think to be a property dualist and a substance materialist. The reasons for being a property dualist support the idea that some phenomenal properties (or qualia) are as fundamental as the most basic physical properties; but what material objects could be the bearers of the qualia? If even some qualia require an adverbial construal (if they (...)
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  13.  282 DLs
    Dean W. Zimmerman (1996). Indivisible Parts and Extended Objects. The Monist 79 (1):148--80.score: 30.8
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  14.  277 DLs
    Andrew Chignell & Dean Zimmerman (2012). Review: Saving God From Saving God. [REVIEW] Books and Culture 15 (3).score: 30.8
    Mark Johnston’s book, Saving God (Princeton University Press, 2010) has two main goals, one negative and the other positive: (1) to eliminate the gods of the major Western monotheisms (Judaism, Christianity, and Islam) as candidates for the role of “the Highest One”; (2) to introduce the real Highest One, a panentheistic deity worthy of devotion and capable of extending to us the grace needed to transform us from inwardly-turned sinners to practitioners of agape. In this review, we argue that Johnston’s (...)
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  15.  252 DLs
    Dean Zimmerman (2008). The Privileged Present : Defending an "a-Theory" of Time. In Theodore Sider, John Hawthorne & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Metaphysics. Blackwell Pub. 211--225.score: 30.8
    Uncorrected Proof; please cite published version.
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  16.  247 DLs
    Dean W. Zimmerman (2005). The A-Theory of Time, the B-Theory of Time, and 'Taking Tense Seriously'. Dialectica 59 (4):401–457.score: 30.7
    The paper has two parts: First, I describe a relatively popular thesis in the philosophy of propositional attitudes, worthy of the name “taking tense seriously”; and I distinguish it from a family of views in the metaphysics of time, namely, the A-theories (or what are sometimes called “tensed theories of time”). Once the distinction is in focus, a skeptical worry arises. Some A-theorists maintain that the difference between past, present, and future, is to be drawn in terms of what exists: (...)
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  17.  216 DLs
    Joshua May, Walter Sinnott-Armstrong, Jay G. Hull & Aaron Zimmerman (2010). Practical Interests, Relevant Alternatives, and Knowledge Attributions: An Empirical Study. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 1 (2):265–273.score: 30.6
    In defending his interest-relative account of knowledge in Knowledge and Practical Interests (2005), Jason Stanley relies heavily on intuitions about several bank cases. We experimentally test the empirical claims that Stanley seems to make concerning our common-sense intuitions about these bank cases. Additionally, we test the empirical claims that Jonathan Schaffer seems to make in his critique of Stanley. We argue that our data impugn what both Stanley and Schaffer claim our intuitions about such cases are. To account for these (...)
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  18.  211 DLs
    Dean W. Zimmerman (1996). Persistence and Presentism. Philosophical Papers 25 (2):115-126.score: 30.6
    The ‘friends of temporal parts’ and their opponents disagree about how things persist through time. The former, who hold what is sometimes called a ‘4D’ theory of persistence, typically claim that all objects that last for any period of time are spread out through time in the same way that spatially extended objects are spread out through space — a different part for each region that the object fills. David Lewis calls this manner of persisting ‘perdurance’. The opposing, ‘3D’ theory (...)
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  19.  210 DLs
    Aaron Z. Zimmerman (2007). Against Relativism. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 133 (3):313-348.score: 30.6
    Recent years have brought relativistic accounts of knowledge, first-person belief, and future contingents to prominence. I discuss these views, distinguish non-trivial from trivial forms of relativism, and then argue against relativism in all of its substantive varieties.
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  20.  198 DLs
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2002). Taking Luck Seriously. Journal of Philosophy 99 (11):553-576.score: 30.6
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  21.  181 DLs
    Aaron Zimmerman, Fear of Knowledge: Against Relativism and Constructivism.score: 30.5
    [1] If only Boghossian’s eminently reasonable book were required reading for every freshman considering entrance into the humanities—the next generation of lay-people would be saved from the uncomprehending repetition of relativist slogans, and future scholars would be kept from mounting baroque, ineffectual attempts at their defense. Fear of Knowledge is engaging, easy to read, and hard to dispute. It’s a satisfying work for those in the choir who will enjoy seeing written on the page precisely what we would say to (...)
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  22.  179 DLs
    Dean Zimmerman (2011). Presentism and the Space-Time Manifold. In Craig Callender (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Time. Oxford University Press 163--246.score: 30.5
  23.  174 DLs
    Dean W. Zimmerman (1996). Could Extended Objects Be Made Out of Simple Parts? An Argument for "Atomless Gunk". Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 56 (1):1-29.score: 30.5
  24.  162 DLs
    Aaron Z. Zimmerman (2006). Review of Maria Baghramian, Relativism. [REVIEW] Ars Disputandi 6.score: 30.5
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  25.  156 DLs
    Michael J. Zimmerman, Intrinsic Vs. Extrinsic Value. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 30.5
    Intrinsic value has traditionally been thought to lie at the heart of ethics. Philosophers use a number of terms to refer to such value. The intrinsic value of something is said to be the value that that thing has “in itself,” or “for its own sake,” or “as such,” or “in its own right.” Extrinsic value is value that is not intrinsic.
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  26.  147 DLs
    Aaron Z. Zimmerman (2007). Review of Paul Boghossian, Fear of Knowledge. [REVIEW] Ars Disputandi 7.score: 30.4
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  27.  146 DLs
    Dean Zimmerman (2008). Problems for Animalism. Abstracta 3 (3):23-31.score: 30.4
    My comments have two parts. I begin by laying out the argument that seems to me to be at the core of Olson’s thinking about human persons; and I suggest a problem with his reasons for accepting one of its premises. The premise is warranted by its platitudinous or commonsensical status; but Olson’s arguments lead him to conclusions that undermine the family of platitudes to which it belongs. Then I’ll raise a question about how Olson should construe the vagueness that (...)
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  28.  145 DLs
    Michael E. Zimmerman (2011). Last Man or Overman? Transhuman Appropriations of a Nietzschean Theme. Hedgehog Review 13 (2):31-44.score: 30.4
    To what extent can Nietzsche's idea of the Overman be used in connection with transhumanist notions of highly advanced humans and even posthumans?
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  29.  143 DLs
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). Moral Luck: A Partial Map. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):585-608.score: 30.4
  30.  143 DLs
    Aaron Z. Zimmerman (2008). Self-Knowledge: Rationalism Vs. Empiricism. Philosophy Compass 3 (2):325–352.score: 30.4
    Recent philosophical discussions of self-knowledge have focused on basic cases: our knowledge of our own thoughts, beliefs, sensations, experiences, preferences, and intentions. Empiricists argue that we acquire this sort of self-knowledge through inner perception; rationalists assign basic self-knowledge an even more secure source in reason and conceptual understanding. I try to split the difference. Although our knowledge of our own beliefs and thoughts is conceptually insured, our knowledge of our experiences is relevantly like our perceptual knowledge of the external world.
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  31.  143 DLs
    Aaron Z. Zimmerman (2007). The Nature of Belief. Journal of Consciousness Studies 14 (11):61-82.score: 30.4
    Neo-Cartesian approaches to belief place greater evidential weight on a subject's introspective judgments than do neo-behaviorist accounts. As a result, the two views differ on whether our absent-minded and weak-willed actions are guided by belief. I argue that simulationist accounts of the concept of belief are committed to neo-Cartesianism, and, though the conceptual and empirical issues that arise are inextricably intertwined, I discuss experimental results that should point theory-theorists in that direction as well. Belief is even less closely connected to (...)
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  32.  142 DLs
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1997). Moral Responsibility and Ignorance. Ethics 107 (3):410-426.score: 30.4
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  33.  131 DLs
    Dean W. Zimmerman (2009). Properties, Minds, and Bodies: An Examination of Sydney Shoemaker's Metaphysics. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 78 (3):673-738.score: 30.4
  34.  130 DLs
    Dean Zimmerman (2002). God Inside Time and Before Creation. In Gregory E. Ganssle & David M. Woodruff (eds.), God and Time: Essays on the Divine Nature. Oxford Up 75--94.score: 30.4
    Many theists reject the notion that God’s eternity consists in his timelessness — i.e., in his lacking temporal extension and failing to possess properties at any times. Some of these “divine temporalists” hold that, for philosophical reasons, it is impossible to accept both the timelessness of God and the view that God knows what happens at different times and brings about events in time. 1 Many reject divine timelessness as a dubious import from Platonism with no biblical or theological warrant.2 (...)
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  35.  125 DLs
    Dean W. Zimmerman (1997). Coincident Objects: Could a ‘Stuff Ontology’ Help? Analysis 57 (1):19–27.score: 30.4
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  36.  121 DLs
    Dean Zimmerman (2002). The Constitution of Persons By Bodies: A Critique of Lynne Rudder Baker's Theory of Material Constitution. Philosophical Topics 30 (1):295-338.score: 30.4
  37.  118 DLs
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2006). Is Moral Obligation Objective or Subjective? Utilitas 18 (4):329-361.score: 30.4
    Many philosophers hold that whether an act is overall morally obligatory is an ‘objective’ matter, many that it is a ‘subjective’ matter, and some that it is both. The idea that it is or can be both may seem to promise a helpful answer to the question ‘What ought I to do when I do not know what I ought to do?’ In this article, three broad views are distinguished regarding what it is that obligation essentially concerns: the maximization of (...)
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  38.  114 DLs
    Theodore Sider, John Hawthorne & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.) (2008). Contemporary Debates in Metaphysics. Blackwell Pub..score: 30.3
  39.  114 DLs
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1996). The Concept of Moral Obligation. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.3
    The principal aim of this book is to develop and defend an analysis of the concept of moral obligation. The analysis is neutral regarding competing substantive theories of obligation, whether consequentialist or deontological in character. What it seeks to do is generate new solutions to a range of philosophical problems concerning obligation and its application. Amongst these problems are deontic paradoxes, the supersession of obligation, conditional obligation, prima facie obligation, actualism and possibilism, dilemmas, supererogation, and cooperation. By virtue of its (...)
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  40.  111 DLs
    Michael J. Zimmerman (1987). Luck and Moral Responsibility. Ethics 97 (2):374-386.score: 30.3
    The following argument is addressed: (1) a person is morally responsible for an event's occurring only if that event's occurring was not a matter of luck; (2) no event is such that its occurring is not a matter of luck; therefore, (3) no event is such that someone is morally responsible for its occurring. Two notions of control are distinguished: restricted and complete. (2) is shown false on the first interpretation, (1) on the second. The discussion involves a distinction between (...)
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  41.  106 DLs
    Dean W. Zimmerman (1997). Distinct Indiscernibles and the Bundle Theory. Mind 106 (422):305-309.score: 30.3
  42.  106 DLs
    Aaron Z. Zimmerman (2007). Hume's Reasons. Hume Studies 33 (2):211-256.score: 30.3
    Hume's claim that reason is a slave to the passions involves both a causal thesis: reason cannot cause action without the aid of the passions, and an evaluative thesis: it is improper to evaluate our actions in terms of their reasonableness. On my reading, Hume motivates his causal thesis by arguing that accurate representation is the function of reason, where a faculty of this kind cannot produce action on its own. (The interpretation helps vindicate Hume of the common charge that (...)
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  43.  100 DLs
    Dean W. Zimmerman (1995). Theories of Masses and Problems of Constitution. Philosophical Review 104 (1):53-110.score: 30.3
    The JSTOR Archive is a trusted digital repository providing for long-term preservation and access to leading academic journals and scholarly literature from around the world. The Archive is supported by libraries, scholarly societies, publishers, and foundations. It is an initiative of JSTOR, a not-for-profit organization with a mission to help the scholarly community take advantage of advances in technology. For more information regarding JSTOR, please contact support@jstor.org.
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  44.  99 DLs
    David Zimmerman (1981). Coercive Wage Offers. Philosophy and Public Affairs 10 (2):121-145.score: 30.3
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  45.  96 DLs
    Dean W. Zimmerman (1997). Immanent Causation. Philosophical Perspectives 11 (s11):433-471.score: 30.3
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  46.  94 DLs
    Peter Van Inwagen & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.) (2007). Persons: Human and Divine. Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press ;.score: 30.3
    The nature of persons is a perennial topic of debate in philosophy, currently enjoying something of a revival. In this volume for the first time metaphysical debates about the nature of human persons are brought together with related debates in philosophy of religion and theology. Fifteen specially written essays explore idealist, dualist, and materialist views of persons, discuss specifically Christian conceptions of the value of embodiment, and address four central topics in philosophical theology: incarnation, resurrection, original sin, and the trinity.
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  47.  94 DLs
    Dean W. Zimmerman (1999). One Really Big Liquid Sphere: Reply to Lewis. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 77 (2):213 – 215.score: 30.3
  48.  91 DLs
    David Zimmerman (2001). Thinking with Your Hypothalamus: Reflections on a Cognitive Role for the Reactive Emotions. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 63 (3):521-541.score: 30.3
    In “Freedom and Resentment,” P. F. Strawson argues that the “profound opposition” between the objective and reactive stances is quite compatible with our rationally retaining the latter as important elements in a recognizably human life. Unless he can establish this, he has no hope of establishing his version of compatibilism in the free will debate. But, because objectivity is associated so intimately with the rationally conducted explanation of action, it is not clear how the opposition of these stances is compatible (...)
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  49.  91 DLs
    Michael J. Zimmerman (2009). Understanding What's Good for Us. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 12 (4):429 - 439.score: 30.3
    The ancient question of what a good life consists in is currently the focus of intense debate. There are two aspects to this debate: the first concerns how the concept of a good life is to be understood; the second concerns what kinds of life fall within the extension of this concept. In this paper, I will attend only to the first, conceptual aspect and not to the second, substantive aspect. More precisely, I will address the preliminary, underlying question of (...)
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  50.  90 DLs
    Aaron Z. Zimmerman (2006). By Maria Baghramian. Ars Disputandi 6:1566-5399.score: 30.3
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