Search results for 'Corporate governance Moral and ethical aspects' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Deon Rossouw & Alejo G. Sison (eds.) (2006). Global Perspectives on the Ethics of Corporate Governance. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 1314.0
    This volume takes a “hard look at the soft practice” of corporate governance. It grew out of a series of contributions from the Third ISBEE World Congress on Business Ethics that took place on July 2004 in Melbourne.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jesús Conill Sancho, Christoph Luetge & Tatjana Schó̈nwälder-Kuntze (eds.) (2008). Corporate Citizenship, Contractarianism and Ethical Theory: On Philosophical Foundations of Business Ethics. Ashgate Pub. Company.score: 1197.0
    This study provides a representation of the broad spectrum of theoretical work on topics related to business ethics, with a particular focus on corporate citizenship. It considers relations of business and society alongside social responsibility and moves on to examine the historical and systemic foundations of business ethics, focusing on the concepts of social and ethical responsibilities. The contributors explore established theories and concepts and their impact on moral behaviour. Together, the contributions offer varied philosophical theories in (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Michael D. Greenberg (2012). Corporate Culture and Ethical Leadership Under the Federal Sentencing Guidelines: What Should Boards, Management and Policymakers Do Now? Rand.score: 1092.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Surendra Arjoon (2005). Corporate Governance: An Ethical Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 61 (4):343 - 352.score: 1002.4
    This paper discusses corporate governance issues from a compliance viewpoint. It makes a distinction between legal and ethical compliance mechanisms and shows that the former has clearly proven to be inadequate as it lacks the moral firepower to restore confidence and the ability to build trust. The concepts of freedom of indifference and freedom for excellence provide a theoretical basis for explaining why legal compliance mechanisms are insufficient in dealing with fraudulent practices and may not be (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Norman E. Bowie (2005). Management Ethics. Blackwell Pub..score: 928.0
    My station and its duties : the function of being a manager -- Stockholder management or stakeholder management -- The ethical treatment of employees -- The ethical treatment of customers -- Supply chain management and other issues -- Corporate social responsibility -- Moral imagination, stakeholder theory and systems thinking : one approach to management decision-making -- Leadership.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. S. Prakash Sethi (ed.) (2011). Globalization and Self-Regulation: The Crucial Role That Corporate Codes of Conduct Play in Global Business. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 867.0
    It is imperative for the business community to act now to create global, industry-wide standards of conduct. Corporate strategy expert S. Prakash Sethi along with notable experts on issues of global codes of conduct take an in-depth look at global structures and how regulation works from a corporate perspective, providing case studies of several industries and governments who have begun implementing voluntary codes of conducts, including Equator Principles, ICMM, and The Kimberly Process._ He assesses the many types of (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Josef Wieland (2005). Normativitat Und Governance: Gesellschaftstheoretische Und Philosophische Reflexionen der Governanceethik. Metropolis.score: 839.0
    Vorwort Es ist nicht ohne eine gehörige Portion Skepsis zu sehen, wenn ein Ökonom sich mit Fragen der Philosophie und Gesellschaftstheorie ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Stewart Clegg & Carl Rhodes (eds.) (2006). Management Ethics: Contemporary Contexts. Routledge.score: 823.0
    The purpose of this edited book is to provide new insight into the understanding of ethics as they relate to organization practice and managerial behavior in todays economy. It provides an overview and critique of ethics as it relates to key contemporary challenges and issues for organizations these include globalization, sustainability, consumerism, neo-liberalism, corporate collapses, leadership and corporate regulation. The book is organized around the core question: What are the ethics of organizing in todays institutional environment and what (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Ira A. Jackson (2004). Profits with Principles: Seven Strategies for Delivering Value with Values. Currency/Doubleday.score: 767.0
    In the wake of business scandals at Enron, Arthur Andersen, Global Crossing, Tyco—the list grows daily—there is an increasing sense among employees, executives, investors, and the public that the “anything goes” culture of the New Economy is over. Today, businesses must act responsibly, transparently, and with integrity. Using in-depth case studies and examples from over 50 companies that range from Starbucks to Citigroup, General Motors to General Electric, DuPont to Dell, Ira A. Jackson, former director of the Center for Business (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. C.-F. Wu (2006). The Study of the Relations Among Ethical Considerations, Family Management and Organizational Performance in Corporate Governance. Journal of Business Ethics 68 (2):165 - 179.score: 679.8
    Corporate governance is increasingly becoming an issue of global concern, not least because we are more and more living in a corporate world that transcends international boundaries. The main purpose and motivation of this study is to determine how the international community should motivate businesses in fostering exemplary corporate governance, therefore eliminating obstacles to ethically exemplary behavior. The empirical approach utilized here has been applied to 161 businesses, both listed and over-the-counter (OTC) companies, with the (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Alex W. H. Chan & Hoi Yan Cheung (2012). Cultural Dimensions, Ethical Sensitivity, and Corporate Governance. Journal of Business Ethics 110 (1):45-59.score: 679.8
    The economic globalization process has integrated different competitive markets and pushes firms in different countries to improve their managerial and operational efficiencies. Given the recent empirical evidence for the benefits to firms and stakeholders of good corporate governance (CG) practice, it is expected that good CG practice would be a common strategy for firms in different countries to meet the increasingly intense competition; however, this is not the case. This study examines the differences in CG practices in firms (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Pinghsun Huang, Timothy J. Louwers, Jacquelyn Sue Moffitt & Yan Zhang (2008). Ethical Management, Corporate Governance, and Abnormal Accruals. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):469 - 487.score: 679.8
    Recent research has linked the reduction of abnormal accruals to corporate governance metrics. The results of these studies, however, are based on samples taken from periods prior to promulgated board independence requirements. In other words, during this time period, management not only had discretion over accounting accruals, but also significant influence over the choice of membership on the board of directors. This study suggests that ethical management practices may be a correlated omitted variable in these studies, thus (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Luis Rodriguez-Dominguez, Isabel Gallego-Alvarez & Isabel Maria Garcia-Sanchez (2009). Corporate Governance and Codes of Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 90 (2):187 - 202.score: 623.2
    As a result of recent corporate scandals, several rules have focused on the role played by Boards of Directors on the planning and monitoring of corporate codes of ethics. In theory, outside directors are in a better position than insiders to protect and further the interests of all stakeholders because of their experience and their sense of moral and legal obligations. Female directors also tend to be more sensitive to ethics according to several past studies which explain (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. J. Félix Lozano (2000). The Spanish Code for Good Corporate Governance (Olivencia Report): An Ethical Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 27 (1-2):175 - 180.score: 619.8
    The aim of this article is to analyse the Report on good corporate governance (Olivencia Report) from an ethical point of view. This report was drawn up by a group of experts at the request of the National Commission of the Spanish Stock Exchange Commission (Comisión Nacional del Mercado de Valores), in winter 1998, and began to be implemented over late 1998.This paper is the result of several sessions of discussions with businessmen and managers about the role (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Janet Marta, Anusorn Singhapakdi, Dong-Jin Lee, Sebnem Burnaz, Y. Ilker Topcu, M. G. Serap Atakan & Tugrul Ozkaracalar (2012). The Effects of Corporate Ethical Values and Personal Moral Philosophies on Ethical Intentions in Selling Situations: Evidence From Turkish, Thai, and American Businesspeople. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (2):229-241.score: 606.0
    The goals of this study are to test a pattern of ethical decision making that predicts ethical intentions of individuals within corporations based primarily on the ethical values embedded in corporate culture, and to see whether that model is generally stable across countries. The survey instrument used scales to measure the effects of corporate ethical values, idealism, and relativism on ethical intentions of Turkish, Thai, and American businesspeople. The samples include practitioner members of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Janet Marta, Anusorn Singhapakdi, Dong-Jin Lee, Sebnem Burnaz, Y. Ilker Topcu, M. G. Serap Atakan & Tugrul Ozkaracalar (2012). The Effects of Corporate Ethical Values and Personal Moral Philosophies on Ethical Intentions in Selling Situations: Evidence From Turkish, Thai, and American Businesspeople. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 106 (2):229 - 241.score: 606.0
    The goals of this study are to test a pattern of ethical decision making that predicts ethical intentions of individuals within corporations based primarily on the ethical values embedded in corporate culture, and to see whether that model is generally stable across countries. The survey instrument used scales to measure the effects of corporate ethical values, idealism, and relativism on ethical intentions of Turkish, Thai, and American businesspeople. The samples include practitioner members of (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Thomas A. Hemphill & Waheeda Lillevik (2011). The Global Economic Ethic Manifesto: Implementing a Moral Values Foundation in the Multinational Enterprise. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):213 - 230.score: 602.4
    The Global Economic Ethic Manifesto (" Manifesto") is a moral framework/code of conduct which is both interactive and interdependent with the economic function of the main institutions of the economic system: markets, governments, civil society, and supranational organizations, which lays out a common fundamental vision of what is legitimate, just, and fair in economic activities. The Manifesto includes five universally accepted principles and values: the principle of humanity; the basic values of non-violence and respect for life; the basic values (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Eileen Morgan (1998). Navigating Cross-Cultural Ethics: What Global Managers Do Right to Keep From Going Wrong. Butterworth-Heinemann.score: 598.0
    Through the personal stories of managers running global business, this book takes an inside look into the dilemmas of managers who are asked to make profits ethically according to the dictates of their company's ethics code. It examines what companies `think" they are doing to help managers in those situations and how those managers are actually affected. Thanks to the boost from the 1991 Sentencing Guidelines which minimizes penalties for companies with ethics codes caught in ethical wrongdoing, more than (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Wim Dubbink & Jeffery Smith (2011). A Political Account of Corporate Moral Responsibility. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (2):223-246.score: 588.0
    Should we conceive of corporations as entities to which moral responsibility can be attributed? This contribution presents what we will call a political account of corporate moral responsibility. We argue that in modern, liberal democratic societies, there is an underlying political need to attribute greater levels of moral responsibility to corporations. Corporate moral responsibility is essential to the maintenance of social coordination that both advances social welfare and protects citizens’ moral entitlements. This political (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Jeffery Smith (2011). A Political Account of Corporate Moral Responsibility. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (2):223 - 246.score: 588.0
    Should we conceive of corporations as entities to which moral responsibility can be attributed? This contribution presents what we will call a political account of corporate moral responsibility. We argue that in modern, liberal democratic societies, there is an underlying political need to attribute greater levels of moral responsibility to corporations. Corporate moral responsibility is essential to the maintenance of social coordination that both advances social welfare and protects citizens' moral entitlements. This political (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Matthias Philip Huehn (2008). Unenlightened Economism: The Antecedents of Bad Corporate Governance and Ethical Decline. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):823 - 835.score: 568.8
    The paper expands on Goshal’s criticism of what management as a scientific discipline teaches and the effects on managerial and societal ethics. The main argument put forward is that the economisation of management has a detrimental effect on the practice of management and on society in large. The ideology of economism is described and analysed from an epistemological perspective. The paper argues that the economisation of management not only introduces the problems of economics (three are identified and discussed) but destroys (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Brenda Sutton (ed.) (1993). The Legitimate Corporation: Essential Readings in Business Ethics and Corporate Governance. Blackwell Business.score: 566.4
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. K. Gregory Jin, Ronald Drozdenko & Sara DeLoughy (2013). The Role of Corporate Value Clusters in Ethics, Social Responsibility, and Performance: A Study of Financial Professionals and Implications for the Financial Meltdown. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 112 (1):15-24.score: 565.6
    This article delves into a potential mindset that may be responsible for the recent financial meltdown. Research relating to this mindset from different perspectives is reviewed. The findings from this literature review are used to create a conceptual framework for the empirical, ethical, and corporate social responsibility study of financial professionals. Data were collected from a survey of the professional membership of a large national association of financial professionals. This article reports the results of the analysis of data (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Elizabeth Vallance (1995). Business Ethics at Work. Cambridge University Press.score: 553.0
    This book looks at business ethics from the perspective of the business practitioner, but with the rigour of the moral philosopher. Intended for introductory students of business, commerce and management studies, Business Ethics at Work begins by setting business clearly in the context of creating value for its owners, and develops a practical ethical decision model which can be simply and relevantly applied to the hard moral choices with which business people are faced day to day. Against (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Marie Rama (2012). Corporate Governance and Corruption: Ethical Dilemmas of Asian Business Groups. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):501-519.score: 544.8
    This study looks at how the corporate governance of family-owned business groups, the most dominant form of private sector organising in Asia, deals with different forms of corruption during the course of common business transactions. As a part of an ethnographic study conducted in 2007 to look at the impact of corporate governance reforms in the Philippines, one of the emergent themes from the study was the presence of significant corruption in the business environment of the (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Barbara Arel, Cathy A. Beaudoin & Anna M. Cianci (2012). The Impact of Ethical Leadership, the Internal Audit Function, and Moral Intensity on a Financial Reporting Decision. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):351-366.score: 536.8
    Two elements of corporate governance—the strength of ethical executive leadership and the internal audit function (IAF hereafter)—provide guidance to accounting managers making decisions involving uncertainty. We examine the joint effect of these two factors, manipulated at two levels (strong, weak), in an experiment in which accounting professionals decide whether to book a questionable journal entry (i.e., a journal entry for which a reasonable business case can be made but there is no supporting documentation). We find that (...) leadership and the IAF interact to determine the likelihood that accountants book the entry. Specifically, accountants are less likely to book a questionable journal entry when there is a weak ethical leader and a strong IAF compared to all other conditions. In addition, we find that accountants question the appropriateness and ethicalness of the request to book an undocumented journal entry more in the weak ethical leader and strong IAF condition than in the other conditions. These results suggest that the IAF has a different impact on financial reporting decisions depending on the ethicalness of executive leadership and that a strong IAF may cause accountants to question the appropriateness and ethicalness of an undocumented journal entry when combined with weak ethical leadership. We also find that the interactive effect of ethical leadership and the IAF on an accountant’s decision is fully mediated by his/her perception of the moral intensity of the issue. Thus, accountants, who perceive greater moral intensity associated with booking the entry, are less willing to do so. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Silke Machold, Pervaiz K. Ahmed & Stuart S. Farquhar (2008). Corporate Governance and Ethics: A Feminist Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (3):665 - 678.score: 532.8
    The mainstream literature on corporate governance is based on the premise of conflicts of interest in a competitive game played by variously defined stakeholders and thus builds explicitly and/or implicitly on masculinist ethical theories. This article argues that insights from feminist ethics, and in particular ethics of care, can provide a different, yet relevant, lens through which to study corporate governance. Based on feminist ethical theories, the article conceptualises a governance model that is (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Kenneth E. Goodpaster (2007). Conscience and Corporate Culture. Blackwell Pub..score: 521.6
    Conscience and Corporate Culture advances the constructive dialogue on a moral conscience for corporations. Written for educators in the field of business ethics and practicing corporate executives, the book serves as a platform on a subject profoundly difficult and timely. Written from the unique vantage point of an author who is a philosopher, professor of business administration, and a corporate consultant A vital resource for both educators in the field of business ethics and practicing corporate (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Timothy Pinghsun Huang, Jacquelyn Sue Moffitt J. Louwers & Yan Zhang (2008). Ethical Management, Corporate Governance, and Abnormal Accruals. Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3).score: 510.6
    Recent research has linked the reduction of abnormal accruals to corporate governance metrics. The results of these studies, however, are based on samples taken from periods prior to promulgated board independence requirements. In other words, during this time period, management not only had discretion over accounting accruals, but also significant influence over the choice of membership on the board of directors. This study suggests that ethical management practices may be a correlated omitted variable in these studies, thus (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. John Roberts (2001). Corporate Governance and the Ethics of Narcissus. Business Ethics Quarterly 11 (1):109-127.score: 504.0
    This paper offers an extended critique of the proliferation of talk and writing of business ethics in recent years. FollowingLevinas, it is argued that the ground of ethics lies in our corporeal sensibility to proximate others. Such moral sensibility, however, isreadily blunted by a narcissistic preoccupation with self and securing the perception of self in the eyes of powerful others. Drawing upon a Lacanian account of the formation of the subject, and a Foucaultian account of the workings of disciplinary (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. E. Günter Schumacher & David M. Wasieleski (2013). Erratum To: Institutionalizing Ethical Innovation in Organizations: An Integrated Causal Model of Moral Innovation Decision Processes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 113 (1):181-182.score: 502.4
    This article answers several calls—coming as well from corporate governance practitioners as from corporate governance researchers—concerning the possibility of complying simultaneously with requirements of innovation and ethics. Revealing the long-term orientation as the variable which permits us to link the principal goal of organization, being “survival,” with innovation and ethic, the article devises a framework for incorporating ethics into a company’s processes and strategies for innovation. With the principal goal of organizations being “survival” in the long-term, (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Neil C. Herndon, John P. Fraedrich & Quey-Jen Yeh (2001). An Investigation of Moral Values and the Ethical Content of the Corporate Culture: Taiwanese Versus U.S. Sales People. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (1):73 - 85.score: 495.0
    An empirical study using two ethics-related and three sales force outcome variables was conducted in Taiwan and compared to an existing U.S. sample. Across the two national cultures, individual perceptions of corporate ethics appears to be a more direct determinant of organizational commitment than individual moral values. Differences between the two national cultures were found in ethics perception as it relates to moral values, job satisfaction, and turnover intention. Explanations for the differences are discussed.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Michael John McNamee & Scott Fleming (2007). Ethics Audits and Corporate Governance: The Case of Public Sector Sports Organizations. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 73 (4):425 - 437.score: 490.0
    This article presents a theorized and conceptually informed method for the undertaking of an ethics audit organization. At an operational level, the overall integrity of an organization, it is argued, may be evaluated through the application of a conceptual frame-work that embraces the inter-related themes of individual responsibility, social equity and political responsibility. Finally, a method is presented for ethics audit which was developed in the auditing of a national public sector sports organization: sportscotland. This emphasizes the significance of key (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Simone De Colle & Patricia H. Werhane (2008). Moral Motivation Across Ethical Theories: What Can We Learn for Designing Corporate Ethics Programs? Journal of Business Ethics 81 (4):751 - 764.score: 489.0
    In this article we discuss what are the implications for improving the design of corporate ethics programs, if we focus on the moral motivation accounts offered by main ethical theories. Virtue ethics, deontological ethics and utilitarianism offer different criteria of judgment to face moral dilemmas: Aristotle's virtues of character, Kant's categorical imperative, and Mill's greatest happiness principle are, respectively, their criteria to answer the question "What is the right thing to do?" We look at ethical (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jinhan Pae & Tae Hee Choi (2011). Corporate Governance, Commitment to Business Ethics, and Firm Valuation: Evidence From the Korean Stock Market. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 100 (2):323 - 348.score: 469.8
    A variety of stakeholders have long been interested in the factors that are related to firm valuation. This article investigates why companies with more comprehensive corporate governance (CG) have a value premium over companies with less comprehensive CG. We posit and find that the cost of equity capital (COC) decreases with the strength of CG, suggesting that the value premium stems from the lower COC for more comprehensive CG. We also find that the COC is lower for companies (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Noel M. Cowell (ed.) (2007). Ethical Perspectives for Caribbean Business. Arawak.score: 453.6
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Stephen M. Goldman (2008). Temptations in the Office: Ethical Choices and Legal Obligations. Praeger.score: 453.6
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Alan Lovell (2002). Ethics as a Dependent Variable in Individual and Organisational Decision Making. Journal of Business Ethics 37 (2):145 - 163.score: 446.4
    This paper draws upon a recently completed research study of the responses of accountants and HR professionals to actual issues at work that had posed them ethical qualms. The study sought to get beyond ethical reasoning about hypothetical scenarios and to address issues of actual behaviour, focusing upon the interviewees explanations of these behaviours. In general terms there was an observable difference between the attitudes and behaviours of accountants and HR professions, but not in the simple, stereotypical sense. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Vasil Gluchman (2013). Pious Aspects in the Ethical and Moral Views of Matthias Bel. History of European Ideas 39 (6):776-790.score: 441.0
    Summary The author of the paper studies the ethical views of Matthias Bel expressed in his Preface to Johann Arndt's treatise and in Davidian-Solomonian Ethics, which contain a critique of false Christianity and ancient (especially Aristotle's) ethics. Bel refuses any philosophical ethics based on human nature, since man, in his very essence, is sinful and vicious. This leads to the general moral downfall of the young and mankind. He only recognises ethics whose source and the highest good is (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Avshalom M. Adam & Mark S. Schwartz (2009). Corporate Governance, Ethics, and the Backdating of Stock Options. Journal of Business Ethics 85 (1):225 - 237.score: 439.8
    Backdating of stock options is an example of an agency problem. It has emerged despite all the measures (i.e., new regulations and additional corporate governance mechanisms) aimed at addressing such problems? Beyond such negative controlling measures, a more positive empowering approach based on ethics may also be necessary. What ethical measures need to be taken to address the agency problem? What values and norms should guide the board of directors in protecting the shareholders' interests? To examine these (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Samuel Mansell (2008). Proximity and Rationalisation: The Limits of a Levinasian Ethics in the Context of Corporate Governance and Regulation. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 83 (3):565 - 577.score: 439.8
    In this article, I explore how the ideas of French philosopher Emmanuel Levinas offer insights into a debate often held today in the field of corporate governance, concerning the relative merits of statutory and voluntary approaches to the regulation of business. The philosophical position outlined by Levinas questions whether any rule-based systematisation of ethical responsibility, either statutory or voluntary, can ever equate to a genuine responsibility for the other person. I reflect on how various authors have adapted (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Kevin Gibson (2007). Ethics and Business: An Introduction. Cambridge University Press.score: 437.6
    In this lively undergraduate textbook, Kevin Gibson explores the relationship between ethics and the world of business, and how we can serve the interests of both. He builds a philosophical groundwork that can be applied to a wide range of issues in ethics and business, and shows readers how to assess dilemmas critically and work to resolve them on a principled basis. Using case studies drawn from around the world, he examines topics including stakeholder responsibilities, sustainability, corporate social responsibility, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. William Ernest Barton (1966). The Moral Challenge of Communism: Some Ethical Aspects of Marxist-Leninist Society. London, Friends Home Service Committee.score: 429.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. J. Arlebrink (1997). The Moral Roots of Prenatal Diagnosis. Ethical Aspects of the Early Introduction and Presentation of Prenatal Diagnosis in Sweden. Journal of Medical Ethics 23 (4):260-261.score: 426.0
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Marie Dela Rama (2012). Corporate Governance and Corruption: Ethical Dilemmas of Asian Business Groups. Journal of Business Ethics 109 (4):501-519.score: 426.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. A. E. Tenbrunsel (2005). From Corporate Governance to Mutual Funds and IPOs to Music Piracy to Value Statements: Contemporary Ethical Issues as Identified by the Business Academic Community. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (2):99 - 100.score: 426.0
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Xin-an Lu (2003). Shared Governance: The Ethical and Practical Method for Corporate Success. Electronic Journal of Business Ethics and Organization Studies 8 (1):1.score: 426.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Terence Jackson (2011). International Management Ethics: A Critical, Cross-Cultural Perspective. Cambridge University Press.score: 425.6
    What can we learn about management ethics from other cultures and societies? In this textbook, cross-cultural management theory is applied and made relevant to management ethics. To help the reader understand different approaches that global businesses can take to operate successfully and ethically, there are chapters focusing on specific countries and regions. As well as giving the wider geographical, political and cultural contexts, the book includes numerous examples in every chapter to help the reader critique universal assumptions of what is (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Gary Duhon (2008). An Uncomfortable Refusal Pp. 15-15 HTML Version | PDF Version (78k) Subject Headings: Premature Infants -- Medical Care -- Moral and Ethical Aspects. Commentary. [REVIEW] Hastings Center Report 38 (5):pp. 15-16.score: 423.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Colin Boyd (1996). Ethics and Corporate Governance: The Issues Raised by the Cadbury Report in the United Kingdom. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (2):167 - 182.score: 418.0
    In the late 1980s there was a series of sensational business scandals in the United Kingdom. There was particular public outrage at the plundering of pension funds by Robert Maxwell, at the failure of auditors to expose the impending bankruptcy of the Bank of Credit and Commerce International, and at the apparently undeserved high pay raises received by senior business executives. The City of London responded by creating a special committee to examine the financial aspects of corporate (...). This paper describes the resulting Code of Best Practice produced by the Cadbury Committee. To reduce the power of executive directors in the boardroom the Code recommends a greater role for non-executive directors, changes in board operations, and a more active role for auditors. The paper reviews the various published reactions to the Cadbury Report, and concludes that the Code is unlikely to halt the incidence of business scandals in the United Kingdom. (shrink)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000