Search results for 'Corroboration' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Darrell P. Rowbottom (2010). Corroboration and Auxiliary Hypotheses: Duhem's Thesis Revisited. Synthese 177 (1):139-149.score: 24.0
    This paper argues that Duhem’s thesis does not decisively refute a corroboration-based account of scientific methodology (or ‘falsificationism’), but instead that auxiliary hypotheses are themselves subject to measurements of corroboration which can be used to inform practice. It argues that a corroboration-based account is equal to the popular Bayesian alternative, which has received much more recent attention, in this respect.
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  2. Darrell P. Rowbottom (2013). Popper's Measure of Corroboration and P(H|B). British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 64 (4):axs029.score: 24.0
    This article shows that Popper’s measure of corroboration is inapplicable if, as Popper argued, the logical probability of synthetic universal statements is zero relative to any evidence that we might possess. It goes on to show that Popper’s definition of degree of testability, in terms of degree of logical content, suffers from a similar problem. 1 The Corroboration Function and P(h|b) 2 Degrees of Testability and P(h|b).
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  3. Carl G. Wagner (2013). The Corroboration Paradox. Synthese 190 (8):1455-1469.score: 24.0
    Evidentiary propositions E 1 and E 2, each p-positively relevant to some hypothesis H, are mutually corroborating if p(H|E 1 ∩ E 2) > p(H|E i ), i = 1, 2. Failures of such mutual corroboration are instances of what may be called the corroboration paradox. This paper assesses two rather different analyses of the corroboration paradox due, respectively, to John Pollock and Jonathan Cohen. Pollock invokes a particular embodiment of the principle of insufficient reason to argue (...)
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  4. Darrell P. Rowbottom (2008). The Big Test of Corroboration. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 22 (3):293 – 302.score: 18.0
    This paper presents a new 'discontinuous' view of Popper's theory of corroboration, where theories cease to have corroboration values when new severe tests are devised which have not yet been performed, on the basis of a passage from The Logic of Scientific Discovery . Through subsequent analysis and discussion, a novel problem for Popper's account of corroboration, which holds also for the standard ('continuous') view, emerges. This is the problem of the Big Test: that the severest (...)
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  5. Darrell P. Rowbottom (2008). Intersubjective Corroboration. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 39 (1):124-132.score: 18.0
    How are we to understand the use of probability in corroboration functions? Popper says logically, but does not show we could have access to, or even calculate, probability values in a logical sense. This makes the logical interpretation untenable, as Ramsey and van Fraassen have argued. -/- If corroboration functions only make sense when the probabilities employed therein are subjective, however, then what counts as impressive evidence for a theory might be a matter of convention, or even whim. (...)
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  6. E. Kurt Lienau & Rob DeSalle (2009). Evidence, Content and Corroboration and the Tree of Life. Acta Biotheoretica 57:187–199.score: 18.0
    We examine three critical aspects of Popper’s formulation of the ‘ Logic of Scientific Discovery ’—evidence, content and degree of corroboration—and place these concepts in the context of the Tree of Life (ToL) problem with particular reference to molecular systematics. Content, in the sense discussed by Popper, refers to the breadth and scope of existence that a hypothesis purports to explain. Content, in conjunction with the amount of available and relevant evidence, determines the testability, or potential degree of (...), of a statement; content distinguishes scientific hypotheses from metaphysical assertions. Degree of corroboration refers to the relative and tentative confidence assigned to one hypothesis over another, based upon the performance of each under critical tests. Here we suggest that systematists attempt to maximize content and evidence to increase the potential degree of corroboration in all phylogenetic endeavors. Discussion of this “total evidence” approach leads to several interesting conclusions about generating ToL hypotheses. (shrink)
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  7. Marks R. Nester (1998). Significance Tests Cannot Be Justified in Theory-Corroboration Experiments. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):213-213.score: 18.0
    Chow's one-tailed null-hypothesis significance-test procedure, with its rationale based on the elimination of chance influences, is not appropriate for theory-corroboration experiments. Estimated effect sizes and their associated standard errors or confidence limits will always suffice.
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  8. J. C. Robbins (1968). Salmon and Red Herring: Does Corroboration Entail Induction? Telos 1968 (1):27-33.score: 18.0
    The general question I shall consider here is this: To what are we committed when we say that we “accept” or “entertain” a scientific hypothesis? I shall be concerned with whether or not such acceptance requires an inductive inference, and in particular with whether or not Wesley Salmon's analysis of Popper's idea of “degree of corroboration” is correct. -/- The problem of what claim we make for the hypotheses we accept is not, I think, of merely academic interest, although (...)
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  9. Kevin de Queiroz & Steven Poe (2001). Philosophy and Phylogenetic Inference: A Comparison of Likelihood and Parsimony Methods in the Context of Karl Popper's Writings on Corroboration. Systematic Biology 50 (3):305-321.score: 18.0
    Advocates of cladistic parsimony methods have invoked the philosophy of Karl Popper in an attempt to argue for the superiority of those methods over phylogenetic methods based on Ronald Fisher's statistical principle of likelihood. We argue that the concept of likelihood in general, and its application to problems of phylogenetic inference in particular, are highly compatible with Popper's philosophy. Examination of Popper's writings reveals that his concept of corroboration is, in fact, based on likelihood. Moreover, because probabilistic assumptions are (...)
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  10. Reuven Dar (1998). Null Hypothesis Tests and Theory Corroboration: Defending NHSTP Out of Context. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):196-197.score: 16.0
    Chow's defense of NHSTP ignores the fact that in psychology it is used to test substantive hypotheses in theory-corroborating research. In this role, NHSTP is not only inadequate, but damaging to the progress of psychology as a science. NHSTP does not fulfill the Popperian requirement that theories be tested severely. It also encourages nonspecific predictions and feeble theoretical formulations.
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  11. Joseph Agassi (1959). Corroboration Versus Induction. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 9 (36):311-317.score: 15.0
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  12. K. R. Popper (1958). A Third Note on Degree of Corroboration or Confirmation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 8 (32):294-302.score: 15.0
  13. I. J. Good (1968). Corroboration, Explanation, Evolving Probability, Simplicity and a Sharpened Razor. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 19 (2):123-143.score: 15.0
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  14. Hilary Putnam (1991). The `Corroboration' of Theories. Philosophy of Science:121--137.score: 15.0
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  15. L. Jonathan Cohen (1982). What is Necessary for Testimonial Corroboration? British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 33 (2):161-164.score: 15.0
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  16. K. R. Popper (1960). Probabilistic Independence and Corroboration by Empirical Tests. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 10 (40):315-318.score: 15.0
  17. Arthur Falk (1986). Cohen on Corroboration. Mind 95 (377):110-115.score: 15.0
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  18. Irving John Good (1975). Explicativity, Corroboration, and the Relative Odds of Hypotheses. Synthese 30 (1-2):39 - 73.score: 15.0
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  19. W. W. Bartley (1961). A Note on Barker's Discussion of Popper's Theory of Corroboration. Philosophical Studies 12 (1-2):5 - 10.score: 15.0
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  20. G. B. Keene (1961). Confirmation and Corroboration. Mind 70 (277):85-87.score: 15.0
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  21. I. Levi (1963). Corroboration and Rules of Acceptance. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 13 (52):307-313.score: 15.0
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  22. Milton Fisk (1959). Falsifiability and Corroboration. Philosophical Studies 9:49-65.score: 15.0
  23. Alex C. Michalos (1966). Estimated Utility and Corroboration. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 16 (64):327-331.score: 15.0
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  24. L. Jonathan Cohen (1986). The Corroboration Theorem: A Reply to Falk. Mind 95 (380):510-512.score: 15.0
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  25. Douglas Shrader (1983). Book Review:Scientific Knowledge: Causation, Explanation, and Corroboration James H. Fetzer. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 50 (4):660-.score: 15.0
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  26. Barry Gower (1989). Corroboration Versus Borrocoration. Analysis 49 (1):8 - 10.score: 15.0
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  27. Carl G. Wagner (1991). Corroboration and Conditional Positive Relevance. Philosophical Studies 61 (3):295 - 300.score: 15.0
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  28. I. Grattan-Guinness (2004). The Place of the Notion of Corroboration in Karl Popper's Philosophy of Science. In Friedrich Stadler (ed.), Induction and Deduction in the Sciences. Springer. 251.score: 15.0
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  29. Alex Mesoudi, Simon Blanchet, Anne Charmantier, Étienne Danchin, Laurel Fogarty, Eva Jablonka, Kevin N. Laland, Thomas J. H. Morgan, Gerd B. Müller, F. John Odling-Smee & Benoît Pujol (2013). Is Non-Genetic Inheritance Just a Proximate Mechanism? A Corroboration of the Extended Evolutionary Synthesis. Biological Theory 7 (3):189-195.score: 15.0
    What role does non-genetic inheritance play in evolution? In recent work we have independently and collectively argued that the existence and scope of non-genetic inheritance systems, including epigenetic inheritance, niche construction/ecological inheritance, and cultural inheritance—alongside certain other theory revisions—necessitates an extension to the neo-Darwinian Modern Synthesis (MS) in the form of an Extended Evolutionary Synthesis (EES). However, this argument has been challenged on the grounds that non-genetic inheritance systems are exclusively proximate mechanisms that serve the ultimate function of calibrating organisms (...)
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  30. Mary Tiles (1985). Scientific Knowledge: Causation, Explanation and Corroboration. Philosophical Books 26 (1):39-40.score: 15.0
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  31. Kenneth W. Witwer & Kendal D. Hirschi (2014). Transfer and Functional Consequences of Dietary microRNAs in Vertebrates: Concepts in Search of Corroboration. Bioessays 36 (4):394-406.score: 15.0
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  32. Joseph Agassi (2007). Corroboration Spurious and Genuine. Poznan Studies in the Philosophy of the Sciences and the Humanities 93 (1):81.score: 15.0
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  33. Jozef Katina (2012). Corroboration in Popper's Theory of Science. Filozofia 67 (2):124-135.score: 15.0
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  34. I. Niiniluoto (1989). Corroboration, Verisimilitude, and the Success of Science in Imre Lakatos and Theories of Scientific Change. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 111:229-243.score: 15.0
     
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  35. Harry V. Stopes-Roe (1968). Review: Hugues LeBlanc, On So-Called Degrees of Confirmation; K. R. Popper, Probabilistic Independence and Corroboration by Empirical Tests. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 33 (1):146-146.score: 15.0
  36. R. H. Vincent (1963). Corroboration and Probability. Dialogue 2 (02):194-205.score: 15.0
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  37. Elie Zahar (1989). John Watkins on the Empirical Basis and the Corroboration of Scientific Theories. In. In Fred D'Agostino & I. C. Jarvie (eds.), Freedom and Rationality. Reidel. 325--341.score: 15.0
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  38. E. Zahar (1989). John Watkins on the Empirical Basis and the Corroboration of Scientific Theories in Freedom and Rationality. Essays in Honor of John Watkins. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 117:325-341.score: 15.0
     
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  39. A. A. S. Zuckerman (1984). Corroboration: Judicial Reform in Canada. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 4 (1):147-152.score: 15.0
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  40. David Godden (2014). Modeling Corroborative Evidence: Inference to the Best Explanation as Counter–Rebuttal. Argumentation 28 (2):187-220.score: 12.0
    Corroborative evidence has a dual function in argument. Primarily, it functions to provide direct evidence supporting the main conclusion. But it also has a secondary, bolstering function which increases the probative value of some other piece of evidence in the argument. This paper argues that the bolstering effect of corroborative evidence is legitimate, and can be explained as counter–rebuttal achieved through inference to the best explanation. A model (argument diagram) of corroborative evidence, representing its structure and operation as a schematic (...)
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  41. Douglas Walton & Chris Reed (2008). Evaluating Corroborative Evidence. Argumentation 22 (4):531-553.score: 10.0
    How should we evaluate an argument in which two witnesses independently testify to some claim? In fact what would happen is that the testimony of the second witness would be taken to corroborate that of the first to some extent, thereby boosting up the plausibility of the first argument from testimony. But does that commit the fallacy of double counting, because the second testimony is already taken as independent evidence supporting the claim? Perhaps the corroboration effect should be considered (...)
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  42. Greg Bamford (1989). Watkins and the Pragmatic Problem of Induction. Analysis 49 (4):203 - 205..score: 9.0
    Watkins proposes a neo-Popperian solution to the pragmatic problem of induction. He asserts that evidence can be used non-Inductively to prefer the principle that corroboration is more successful over all human history than that, Say, Counter-Corroboration is more successful either over this same period or in the future. Watkins's argument for rejecting the first counter-Corroborationist alternative is beside the point, However, As whatever is the best strategy over all human history is irrelevant to the pragmatic problem of induction (...)
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  43. Siu L. Chow (1998). Précis of Statistical Significance: Rationale, Validity, and Utility. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):169-194.score: 9.0
    The null-hypothesis significance-test procedure (NHSTP) is defended in the context of the theory-corroboration experiment, as well as the following contrasts: (a) substantive hypotheses versus statistical hypotheses, (b) theory corroboration versus statistical hypothesis testing, (c) theoretical inference versus statistical decision, (d) experiments versus nonexperimental studies, and (e) theory corroboration versus treatment assessment. The null hypothesis can be true because it is the hypothesis that errors are randomly distributed in data. Moreover, the null hypothesis is never used as a (...)
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  44. Erik J. Olsson (2002). Corroborating Testimony, Probability and Surprise. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (2):273-288.score: 8.0
    Jonathan Cohen has claimed that in cases of witness agreement there is an inverse relationship between the prior probability and the posterior probability of what is being agreed: the posterior rises as the prior falls. As is demonstrated in this paper, this contention is not generally valid. In fact, in the most straightforward case exactly the opposite is true: a lower prior also means a lower posterior. This notwithstanding, there is a grain of truth to what Cohen is saying, as (...)
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  45. Fred L. Bookstein (1998). Statistical Significance Testing Was Not Meant for Weak Corroborations of Weaker Theories. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):195-196.score: 8.0
    Chow sets his version of statistical significance testing in an impoverished context of “theory corroboration” that explicitly excludes well-posed theories admitting of strong support by precise empirical evidence. He demonstrates no scientific usefulness for the problematic procedure he recommends instead. The important role played by significance testing in today's behavioral and brain sciences is wholly inconsistent with the rhetoric he would enforce.
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  46. Michael Akeroyd (2010). The Philosophical Significance of Mendeleev's Successful Predictions of the Properties of Gallium and Scandium. Foundations of Chemistry 12 (2):117-122.score: 6.0
  47. I. J. Good (1982). A Good Explanation of an Event is Not Necessarily Corroborated by the Event. Philosophy of Science 49 (2):251-253.score: 6.0
    It is shown by means of a simple example that a good explanation of an event is not necessarily corroborated by the occurrence of that event. It is also shown that this contention follows symbolically if an explanation having higher "explicativity" than another is regarded as better.
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  48. Erik J. Olsson (2002). Corroborating Testimony and Ignorance: A Reply to Bovens, Fitelson, Hartmann and Snyder. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 53 (4):565-572.score: 6.0
    In an earlier paper, I objected to certain elements of L. Jonathan Cohen's account of corroborating testimony (Olsson [2002]). In their response to my article, Bovens, Fitelson, Hartmann and Snyder ([2002]) suggest some significant improvements of the probabilistic model which I used in assessing Cohen's theses and answer some additional questions which my study raised. More problematically, they also seek to defend Cohen against my criticism. I argue, in this reply, that their attempts in this direction are unsuccessful.
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  49. John Woods (1992). Apocalyptic Relevance. Argumentation 6 (2):189-202.score: 6.0
    In their book, Relevance, Sperber and Wilson make an important contribution towards constructing a credible theory of this unforthcoming notion. All is not clear sailing, however. If it is accepted as a condition on the adequacy of any account of relevance that it not be derivable either that nothing is relevant to anything or that everything is relevant to everything, it can be shown that Sperber and Wilson come close to violating the condition.
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  50. Max Seeger, The Critique From Experimental Philosophy: Can Philosophical Intuitions Be Externally Corroborated? XXII. Deutscher Kongress für Philosophie.score: 5.0
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