Search results for 'Cosmology, Medieval' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Pierre Maurice Marie Duhem (1985). Medieval Cosmology: Theories of Infinity, Place, Time, Void, and the Plurality of Worlds. University of Chicago Press.
  2. Tamar Rudavsky (2000). Time Matters Time, Creation, and Cosmology in Medieval Jewish Philosophy. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  3. Roger Ariew (ed.) (1987). Medieval Cosmology: Theories of Infinity, Place, Time, Void, and the Plurality of Worlds. University of Chicago Press.
    These selections from _Le système du monde_, the classic ten-volume history of the physical sciences written by the great French physicist Pierre Duhem, focus on cosmology, Duhem's greatest interest. By reconsidering the work of such Arab and Christian scholars as Averroes, Avicenna, Gregory of Rimini, Albert of Saxony, Nicole Oresme, Duns Scotus, and William of Occam, Duhem demonstrated the sophistication of medieval science and cosmology.
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  4.  35
    Karas Marcin (2010). The later medieval cosmology (kosmologia dojrzalego sredniowiecza). Studia Philosophiae Christianae 46 (1).
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  5.  1
    Keith Hutchison (2012). An Angel's View of Heaven: The Mystical Heliocentricity of Medieval Geocentric Cosmology. History of Science 50 (166):33-74.
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    Edward Grant (1987). Pierre Duhem, Medieval Cosmology: Theories of Infinity, Place, Time, Void, and the Plurality of Worlds. Trans. Roger Ariew. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1985. Pp. Xxxi, 601. $35. Abridged Edition in Translation of Le Système du Monde: Histoire des Doctrines Cosmologiques de Platon À Copernic, 10 Vols., Published by Hermann, Paris, 1913–59. [REVIEW] Speculum 62 (4):927-929.
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    Edward Grant (1984). Were There Significant Differences Between Medieval and Early Modern Scholastic Natural Philosophy? The Case for Cosmology. Noûs 18 (1):5-14.
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    Natalia Lozovsky (2008). Bruce S. Eastwood, Ordering the Heavens: Roman Astronomy and Cosmology in the Carolingian Renaissance.(History of Science and Medicine Library, 4; Medieval and Early Modern Science, 8.) Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2007. Pp. Xxiii, 452; Many Black-and-White Figures and Tables.€ 99. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (3):692-694.
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    A. Goddu (2009). Mechanics and Cosmology in the Medieval and Early Modern Period. Annals of Science 66 (2):281-284.
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    Edward Grant (1987). Medieval Cosmology: Theories of Infinity, Place, Time, Void, and the Plurality of Worlds. [REVIEW] Speculum 62 (4):927-929.
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  11. Gad Freudenthal (2001). Time Matters: Time, Creation, and Cosmology in Medieval Jewish Philosophy by T. M. Rudavsky. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 92:160-161.
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  12. Gad Freudenthal (2001). Time Matters: Time, Creation, and Cosmology in Medieval Jewish PhilosophyT. M. Rudavsky. Isis 92 (1):160-161.
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  13. Edward Grant (1987). Medieval Cosmology: Theories of Infinity, Place, Time, Void, and the Plurality of WorldsPierre Duhem Roger Ariew. Speculum 62 (4):927-929.
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  14. J. P. Mallory (1997). Armagh and the Royal Centres in Early Medieval Ireland: Monuments, Cosmology, and the Past.N. B. Aitchison. Speculum 72 (3):777-778.
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  15. Edward Peters (1987). Medieval Cosmology: Theories of Infinity, Place, Time, Void, and the Plurality of WorldsPierre Duhem Roger Ariew. Isis 78 (2):299-300.
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  16. Katherine A. Tredwell (2009). Massimo Bucciantini; Michele Camerota; Sophie Roux .Mechanics and Cosmology in the Medieval and Early Modern Period. Xv + 210 Pp., Illus., Figs., Index. Florence: Leo S. Olschki, 2007. €23. [REVIEW] Isis 100 (2):375-376.
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  17. Evelyn Edson (2004). Medieval Views of the Cosmos. Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.
    Once upon a time, the universe was much simpler: before our modern understanding of an infinite formless space scattered with pulsating stars, revolving planets, and mysterious black holes, the universe was seen as a rigid hierarchical system with the earth and the human race at its center. Medieval Views of the Cosmos investigates this worldview shared by medieval societies, revealing how their modes of thought affect us even today. In the medieval world system--inherited by Christians and Muslims (...)
     
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  18. Owen Gingerich & Robert S. Westman (1988). The Wittich Connection Conflict and Priority in Late Sixteenth-Century Cosmology. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
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  19. Peter Dronke (1974). Fabula: Explorations Into the Uses of Myth in Medieval Platonism. E. J. Brill.
  20. P. P. Gaĭdenko & V. V. Petrov (eds.) (2005). Kosmos I Dusha: Uchenii͡a o Vselennoĭ I Cheloveke V Antichnosti I V Srednie Veka: (Issledovanii͡a I Perevody). Progress-Tradit͡sii͡a.
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  21. Hermes (ed.) (2006). Hermes Trismegistus, de Sex Rerum Principiis. Brepols.
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  22. Concetto Martello, Chiara Militello & Andrea Vella (eds.) (2008). Cosmogonie E Cosmologie Nel Medioevo: Atti Del Convegno Della Società Italiana Per Lo Studio Del Pensiero Medievale (S.I.S.P.M.), Catania, 22-24 Settembre 2006. [REVIEW] Brepols.
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  23. Concetto Martello, Chiara Militello & Andrea Vella (eds.) (2008). Cosmogonie E Cosmologie Nel Medioevo: Atti Del Convegno Della Società Italiana Per Lo Studio Del Pensiero Medievale (S). Brepols.
    Le volume rassemble 25 études concernant la cosmologie médiévale, abordée à travers ses diverses composantes, à l’intérieur d’une fourchette chronologique allant de Calcidius jusqu’au XIVe siècle. Dix contributions sont consacrées à des questions de cosmologie hébraïque et islamique, traitant en particulier de Gersonide (R. Gatti), Maïmonide (L. Pepi), Avicenne (C. Di Martino, O. Lizzini), Sohravardî (I. Panzeca), Qûnawî (P. Spallino), les Frères de la Pureté (C. Baffioni) ainsi qu’aux interférences qui existent entre moyen âge islamique et latin : la grande (...)
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  24. Robert Navon (1991). The Harmony of the Spheres: Speculations on Western Man's Ever-Changing Views of the Cosmos, From Hesiod (700 B.C.) to Newton (1650 A.D.). [REVIEW] Selene Books.
  25. Barbara Obrist (2004). La Cosmologie Médiévale: Textes Et Images. Sismel, Edizioni Del Galluzzozioni Del Galluzzo.
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  26.  7
    Rudolf Simek (1996). Heaven and Earth in the Middle Ages: The Physical World Before Columbus. Boydell Press.
    A discussion of European understanding of the physical world from the 9th century to the 15th, ranging from astronomy to zoology and refuting the more recent ...
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  27. Marija Todoroska (2009). Aristotel I Predsokratovcite: Fizikalno-Kosmološki Teorii. Az-Buki.
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  28. Adam Takahashi (2008). Nature, Formative Power and Intellect in the Natural Philosophy of Albert the Great. Early Science and Medicine 13 (5):451-481.
    The Dominican theologian Albert the Great was one of the first to investigate into the system of the world on the basis of an acquaintance with the entire Aristotelian corpus, which he read under the influence of Islamic philosophers. The present study aims to understand the core of Albert's natural philosophy. Albert's emblematic phrase, “every work of nature is the work of intelligence” , expresses the conviction that natural things are produced by the intellects that move the celestial bodies, just (...)
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  29. A. Grunbaum (2000). A New Critique of Theological Interpretations of Physical Cosmology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (1):1-43.
    This paper is a sequel to my 'Theological Misinterpretations of Current Physical Cosmology' (Foundations of Physics [1996], 26 (4); revised in Philo [1998], 1 (1)). There I argued that the Big Bang models of (classical) general relativity theory, as well as the original 1948 versions of the steady state cosmology, are each logically incompatible with the time-honored theological doctrine that perpetual divine creation ('creatio continuans') is required in each of these two theorized worlds. Furthermore, I challenged the perennial theological doctrine (...)
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  30.  35
    A. Grünbaum (2000). A New Critique of Theological Interpretations of Physical Cosmology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (1):1 - 43.
    This paper is a sequel to my 'Theological Misinterpretations of Current Physical Cosmology' (Foundations of Physics [1996], 26 (4); revised in Philo [10998], 1 (1)). There I argued that the Big Bang models of (classical) general relativity theory, as well as the original 1948 versions of the steady state cosmology, are each logically incompatible with the time-honored theological doctrine that perpetual divine creation (creatio continuans') is required in each of these two theorized worlds. Furthermore, I challenged the perennial theological doctrine (...)
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  31.  26
    T. M. Rudavsky (1997). Philosophical Cosmology in Judaism. Early Science and Medicine 2 (2):149-184.
    In this paper I shall examine the philosophical cosmology of medieval Jewish thinkers as developed against the backdrop of their views on time and creation. I shall concentrate upon the Neoplatonic and Aristotelian traditions, with a particular eye to the interweaving of astronomy, cosmology and temporality. This interweaving occurs in part because of the influence of Greek cosmological and astronomical texts upon Jewish philosophers. The tension between astronomy and cosmology is best seen in Maimonides' discussion of creation. Gersonides, on (...)
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  32. François Elmir (2005). Science Et Technique : Études d'Histoire Et D'Épistémologie. Siress.
    -- t. 2. Origines médiévales de la science.
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  33.  12
    André Goddu (2010). Copernicus and the Aristotelian Tradition: Education, Reading, and Philosophy in Copernicus's Path to Heliocentrism. Brill.
    Drawing on a half century of scholarship, of Polish studies of Copernicus and Cracow University, and of Copernicus's sources, this book offers a comprehensive re-evaluation of Copernicus's achievement, and explains his commitment to the ...
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  34. Heinrich Schaller (1934). Die Weltanschauung des Mittelalters. R. Oldenbourg.
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  35.  6
    Kurt Lampe (2005). A Twelfth-Century Text on the Number Nine and Divine Creation: A New Interpretation of Boethian Cosmology? Mediaeval Studies 67 (1):1-26.
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  36.  29
    Gad Freudenthal (2002). The Medieval Astrologization of Aristotle's Biology: Averroes on the Role of the Celestial Bodies in the Generation of Animate Beings. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 12 (1):111-137.
    How do the variegated forms of sublunar substances (the elements, homoeomerous substances, plants, animals) arise in prime matter? Averroes throughout his life believed that “a principle from without” was involved, but changed his mind over its identity. While in an early period of his life he maintained that all forms emanate from the active intellect, he later discarded that metaphysical notion and sought to develop a more naturalistic, astrologically inspired account, which identified the heavenly bodies as the source of sublunar (...)
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  37. Martín López Corredoira (2009). Sociology of Modern Cosmology. In J. A. Rubiño-Martín, J. A. Belmonte, F. Prada & A. Alberdi (eds.), Cosmology across Cultures. Astronomical Society of Pacific 66-73.
    Certain results of observational cosmology cast critical doubt on the foundations of standard cosmology but leave most cosmologists untroubled. Alternative cosmological models that differ from the Big Bang have been published and defended by heterodox scientists; however, most cosmologists do not heed these. This may be because standard theory is correct and all other ideas and criticisms are incorrect, but it is also to a great extent due to sociological phenomena such as the "snowball effect" or "groupthink". We might wonder (...)
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  38. Matthias Schemmel (2014). Medieval Representations of Change and Their Early Modern Application. Foundations of Science 19 (1):11-34.
    The article investigates the role of symbolic means of knowledge representation in concept development using the historical example of medieval diagrams of change employed in early modern work on the motion of fall. The parallel cases of Galileo Galilei, Thomas Harriot, and René Descartes and Isaac Beeckman are discussed. It is argued that the similarities concerning the achievements as well as the shortcomings of their respective work on the motion of fall can to a large extent be attributed to (...)
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  39. Elise M. Crull (2015). Less Interpretation and More Decoherence in Quantum Gravity and Inflationary Cosmology. Foundations of Physics 45 (9):1019-1045.
    I argue that quantum decoherence—understood as a dynamical process entailed by the standard formalism alone—carries us beyond conceptual aspects of non-relativistic quantum mechanics deemed insurmountable by many contributors to the recent quantum gravity and cosmology literature. These aspects include various incarnations of the measurement problem and of the quantum -to-classical puzzle. Not only can such problems be largely bypassed or dissolved without default to a particular interpretation, but theoretical work in relativistic arenas stands to gain substantial physical and philosophical insight (...)
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  40. Hans Halvorson (forthcoming). Theism and Physical Cosmology. In Charles Taliaferro, Victoria Harrison & Stewart Goetz (eds.), Routledge Companion to Theism.
    Physical cosmology purports to establish precise and testable claims about the origin of the universe. Thus, cosmology bears directly on traditional metaphysical claims -- in particular, claims about whether the universe has a creator (i.e. God). What is the upshot of cosmology for the claims of theism? Does big-bang cosmology support theism? Do recent developments in quantum and string cosmology undermine theism? We discuss the relations between physical cosmology to theism from both historical and systematic points of view.
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  41. Graham Oppy (1997). On Some Alleged Consequences of 'the Hartle-Hawking Cosmology'. Sophia 36 (1):84-95.
    In [3], Quentin Smith claims that `the Hartle-Hawking cosmology' is inconsistent with classical theism in a way which redounds to the discredit of classical theism; and, moreover, that the truth of `the Hartle- Hawking cosmology' would undermine reasonsed belief in any other varieties of theism which hold that the universe is created.
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  42. Claus Beisbart (2009). Can We Justifiably Assume the Cosmological Principle in Order to Break Model Underdetermination in Cosmology? Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 40 (2):175 - 205.
    If cosmology is to obtain knowledge about the whole universe, it faces an underdetermination problem: Alternative space-time models are compatible with our evidence. The problem can be avoided though, if there are good reasons to adopt the Cosmological Principle (CP), because, assuming the principle, one can confine oneself to the small class of homogeneous and isotropic space-time models. The aim of this paper is to ask whether there are good reasons to adopt the Cosmological Principle in order to avoid underdetermination (...)
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  43.  5
    Elias Okon & Daniel Sudarsky (2016). Less Decoherence and More Coherence in Quantum Gravity, Inflationary Cosmology and Elsewhere. Foundations of Physics 46 (7):852-879.
    In Crull it is argued that, in order to confront outstanding problems in cosmology and quantum gravity, interpretational aspects of quantum theory can by bypassed because decoherence is able to resolve them. As a result, Crull concludes that our focus on conceptual and interpretational issues, while dealing with such matters in Okon and Sudarsky, is avoidable and even pernicious. Here we will defend our position by showing in detail why decoherence does not help in the resolution of foundational questions in (...)
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  44.  92
    Milan M. Ćirković (2004). Forecast for the Next Eon: Applied Cosmology and the Long-Term Fate of Intelligent Beings. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 34 (2):239-261.
    Cosmology seems extremely remote from everyday human practice and experience. It is usually taken for granted that cosmological data cannot rationally influence our beliefs about the fate of humanity—and possible other intelligent species—except perhaps in the extremely distant future, when the issue of “heat death” (in an ever-expanding universe) becomes actual. Here, an attempt is made to show that it may become a practical question much sooner, if an intelligent community wishes to maximize its creative potential. We estimate, on the (...)
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  45.  94
    David Craig & Parampreet Singh (2011). Consistent Histories in Quantum Cosmology. Foundations of Physics 41 (3):371-379.
    We illustrate the crucial role played by decoherence (consistency of quantum histories) in extracting consistent quantum probabilities for alternative histories in quantum cosmology. Specifically, within a Wheeler-DeWitt quantization of a flat Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmological model sourced with a free massless scalar field, we calculate the probability that the universe is singular in the sense that it assumes zero volume. Classical solutions of this model are a disjoint set of expanding and contracting singular branches. A naive assessment of the behavior of quantum (...)
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  46. Petar V. Grujić (2007). Some Epistemic Questions of Cosmology. Foundations of Science 12 (1):39-83.
    We discuss a number of fundamental aspects of modern cosmological concepts, from the phenomenological, observational, theoretical and epistemic points of view. We argue that the modern cosmology, despite a great advent, in particular in the observational sector, is yet to solve important problems, posed already by the classical times. In particular the stress is put on discerning the scientific features of modern cosmological paradigms from the more speculative ones, with the latter immersed in some aspects deeply into mythological world picture. (...)
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  47.  19
    Martín López-Corredoira (2014). Non-Standard Models and the Sociology of Cosmology. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 46 (1):86-96.
    I review some theoretical ideas in cosmology different from the standard “Big Bang”: the quasi-steady state model, the plasma cosmology model, non-cosmological redshifts, alternatives to non-baryonic dark matter and/or dark energy, and others. Cosmologists do not usually work within the framework of alternative cosmologies because they feel that these are not at present as competitive as the standard model. Certainly, they are not so developed, and they are not so developed because cosmologists do not work on them. It is a (...)
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    James A. Weisheipl (1965). Classification of the Sciences in Medieval Thought. Mediaeval Studies 27 (1):54-90.
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    Sara L. Uckelman (2012). Arthur Prior and Medieval Logic. Synthese 188 (3):349-366.
    Though Arthur Prior is now best known for his founding of modern temporal logic and hybrid logic, much of his early philosophical career was devoted to history of logic and historical logic. This interest laid the foundations for both of his ground-breaking innovations in the 1950s and 1960s. Because of the important rôle played by Prior's research in ancient and medieval logic in his development of temporal and hybrid logic, any student of Prior, temporal logic, or hybrid logic should (...)
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    Shahid Rahman, Tero Tulenheimo & Emmanuel Genot (eds.) (2008). Unity, Truth and the Liar: The Modern Relevance of Medieval Solutions to the Liar Paradox. Springer.
    This volume includes a target paper, taking up the challenge to revive, within a modern (formal) framework, a medieval solution to the Liar Paradox which did ...
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