Search results for 'Cosmology, Medieval' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Pierre Maurice Marie Duhem (1985). Medieval Cosmology: Theories of Infinity, Place, Time, Void, and the Plurality of Worlds. University of Chicago Press.score: 66.0
  2. Evelyn Edson (2004). Medieval Views of the Cosmos. Bodleian Library, University of Oxford.score: 42.0
    Once upon a time, the universe was much simpler: before our modern understanding of an infinite formless space scattered with pulsating stars, revolving planets, and mysterious black holes, the universe was seen as a rigid hierarchical system with the earth and the human race at its center. Medieval Views of the Cosmos investigates this worldview shared by medieval societies, revealing how their modes of thought affect us even today. In the medieval world system--inherited by Christians and Muslims (...)
     
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  3. Peter Dronke (1974). Fabula: Explorations Into the Uses of Myth in Medieval Platonism. E. J. Brill.score: 39.0
  4. Edward Grant (1984). Were There Significant Differences Between Medieval and Early Modern Scholastic Natural Philosophy? The Case for Cosmology. Noûs 18 (1):5-14.score: 36.0
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  5. A. Goddu (2009). Mechanics and Cosmology in the Medieval and Early Modern Period. Annals of Science 66 (2):281-284.score: 36.0
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  6. Edward Grant (1987). Pierre Duhem, Medieval Cosmology: Theories of Infinity, Place, Time, Void, and the Plurality of Worlds. Trans. Roger Ariew. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1985. Pp. Xxxi, 601. $35. Abridged Edition in Translation of Le Système du Monde: Histoire des Doctrines Cosmologiques de Platon à Copernic, 10 Vols., Published by Hermann, Paris, 1913–59. [REVIEW] Speculum 62 (4):927-929.score: 36.0
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  7. Keith Hutchison (2012). An Angel's View of Heaven: The Mystical Heliocentricity of Medieval Geocentric Cosmology. History of Science 50 (166):33-74.score: 36.0
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  8. Natalia Lozovsky (2008). Bruce S. Eastwood, Ordering the Heavens: Roman Astronomy and Cosmology in the Carolingian Renaissance.(History of Science and Medicine Library, 4; Medieval and Early Modern Science, 8.) Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2007. Pp. Xxiii, 452; Many Black-and-White Figures and Tables.€ 99. [REVIEW] Speculum 83 (3):692-694.score: 36.0
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  9. Karas Marcin (2010). The later medieval cosmology (kosmologia dojrzalego sredniowiecza). Studia Philosophiae Christianae 46 (1).score: 36.0
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  10. Rudolf Simek (1996). Heaven and Earth in the Middle Ages: The Physical World Before Columbus. Boydell Press.score: 30.0
    A discussion of European understanding of the physical world from the 9th century to the 15th, ranging from astronomy to zoology and refuting the more recent ...
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  11. P. P. Gaĭdenko & V. V. Petrov (eds.) (2005). Kosmos I Dusha: Uchenii͡a o Vselennoĭ I Cheloveke V Antichnosti I V Srednie Veka: (Issledovanii͡a I Perevody). Progress-Tradit͡sii͡a.score: 30.0
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  12. Hermes (ed.) (2006). Hermes Trismegistus, de Sex Rerum Principiis. Brepols.score: 30.0
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  13. Concetto Martello, Chiara Militello & Andrea Vella (eds.) (2008). Cosmogonie E Cosmologie Nel Medioevo: Atti Del Convegno Della Società Italiana Per Lo Studio Del Pensiero Medievale (S.I.S.P.M.), Catania, 22-24 Settembre 2006. [REVIEW] Brepols.score: 30.0
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  14. Concetto Martello, Chiara Militello & Andrea Vella (eds.) (2008). Cosmogonie E Cosmologie Nel Medioevo: Atti Del Convegno Della Società Italiana Per Lo Studio Del Pensiero Medievale (S. Brepols.score: 30.0
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  15. Robert Navon (1991). The Harmony of the Spheres: Speculations on Western Man's Ever-Changing Views of the Cosmos, From Hesiod (700 B.C.) to Newton (1650 A.D.). [REVIEW] Selene Books.score: 30.0
  16. Barbara Obrist (2004). La Cosmologie Médiévale: Textes Et Images. Sismel, Edizioni Del Galluzzozioni Del Galluzzo.score: 30.0
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  17. Marija Todoroska (2009). Aristotel I Predsokratovcite: Fizikalno-Kosmološki Teorii. Az-Buki.score: 30.0
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  18. Adam Takahashi (2008). Nature, Formative Power and Intellect in the Natural Philosophy of Albert the Great. Early Science and Medicine 13 (5):451-481.score: 24.0
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  19. André Goddu (2010). Copernicus and the Aristotelian Tradition: Education, Reading, and Philosophy in Copernicus's Path to Heliocentrism. Brill.score: 24.0
    Drawing on a half century of scholarship, of Polish studies of Copernicus and Cracow University, and of Copernicus's sources, this book offers a comprehensive re-evaluation of Copernicus's achievement, and explains his commitment to the ...
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  20. François Elmir (2005). Science Et Technique : Études d'Histoire Et D'Épistémologie. Siress.score: 24.0
    -- t. 2. Origines médiévales de la science.
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  21. A. Grunbaum (2000). A New Critique of Theological Interpretations of Physical Cosmology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (1):1-43.score: 21.0
    This paper is a sequel to my 'Theological Misinterpretations of Current Physical Cosmology' (Foundations of Physics [1996], 26 (4); revised in Philo [1998], 1 (1)). There I argued that the Big Bang models of (classical) general relativity theory, as well as the original 1948 versions of the steady state cosmology, are each logically incompatible with the time-honored theological doctrine that perpetual divine creation ('creatio continuans') is required in each of these two theorized worlds. Furthermore, I challenged the perennial theological doctrine (...)
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  22. A. Grünbaum (2000). A New Critique of Theological Interpretations of Physical Cosmology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (1):1 - 43.score: 21.0
    This paper is a sequel to my 'Theological Misinterpretations of Current Physical Cosmology' (Foundations of Physics [1996], 26 (4); revised in Philo [10998], 1 (1)). There I argued that the Big Bang models of (classical) general relativity theory, as well as the original 1948 versions of the steady state cosmology, are each logically incompatible with the time-honored theological doctrine that perpetual divine creation (creatio continuans') is required in each of these two theorized worlds. Furthermore, I challenged the perennial theological doctrine (...)
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  23. Herbert A. Davidson (1992). Alfarabi, Avicenna, and Averroes on Intellect: Their Cosmologies, Theories of the Active Intellect, and Theories of Human Intellect. Oxford University Press.score: 15.0
    A study of problems, all revolving around the subject of intellect in the philosophies of Alfarabi, Avicenna, and Averroes, this book starts by reviewing discussions in Greek and early Arabic philosophy which served as the background for the three Arabic thinkers. Davidson examines the cosmologies and theories of human and active intellect in the three philosophers and covers such subjects as: the emanation of the supernal realm from the First Cause; the emanation of the lower world from the transcendent active (...)
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  24. Gordon Belot, Conservation Principles.score: 12.0
    A conservation principles tell us that some quantity, quality, or aspect remains constant through change. Such principles appear already in ancient and medieval natural philosophy. In one important strand of Greek cosmology, the rotatory motion of the celestial orbs is eternal and immutable. In optics, from at least the time of Euclid, the angle of reflection is equal to the angle of incidence when a ray of light is reflected. According to some versions of the medieval impetus theory (...)
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  25. Cora Diamond (2012). The Skies of Dante and Our Skies: A Response to Ilham Dilman. Philosophical Investigations 35 (3-4):187-204.score: 12.0
    The philosophical image of a “universe of discourse” can be misleading in the suggestions it carries about how to read Wittgenstein and how to approach the topic of the relation between language and reality. That is what I try to show by examining Ilham Dilman's discussion of medieval cosmology. I sketch an alternative account of the relation between medieval beliefs about the heavens and our astronomical beliefs, and I consider in detail the disagreement between the two accounts.
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  26. Gad Freudenthal (2002). The Medieval Astrologization of Aristotle's Biology: Averroes on the Role of the Celestial Bodies in the Generation of Animate Beings. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 12 (1):111-137.score: 12.0
    How do the variegated forms of sublunar substances (the elements, homoeomerous substances, plants, animals) arise in prime matter? Averroes throughout his life believed that “a principle from without” was involved, but changed his mind over its identity. While in an early period of his life he maintained that all forms emanate from the active intellect, he later discarded that metaphysical notion and sought to develop a more naturalistic, astrologically inspired account, which identified the heavenly bodies as the source of sublunar (...)
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  27. Simon Oliver (2005). Philosophy, God, and Motion. Routledge.score: 12.0
    In the post-Newtonian world motion is assumed to be a simple category which relates to the locomotion of bodies in space, and is usually associated only with physics. Philosophy, God and Motion shows that this is a relatively recent understanding of motion and that prior to the scientific revolution motion was a much broader and more mysterious category, applying to moral as well as physical movements. Simon Oliver presents fresh interpretations of key figures in the history of western thought (...)
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  28. L. Michael Harrington (2005). The Argument for Universal Immortality in Eriugena's “Zoology”. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (4):611-633.score: 12.0
    Apparently alone among medieval Christians, Eriugena argues that all life is immortal. He relies on Plato’s Timaeus as his primary source for this claim, but he modifies the argument of the Timaeus considerably. He turns Plato’s cosmic soul into the genus of life, thereby taking a treatise that originally dealt with cosmology and using it to explore the ontological significance of definition. All species that fall under the genus of life must be immortal, because a mortal species would contradict (...)
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  29. David Christian (2008). Big History. Teaching Co..score: 12.0
    Part 1. Lecture 1. What is big history? ; Lecture 2. Moving across multiple scales ; Lecture 3. Simplicity and complexity ; Lecture 4. Evidence and the nature of science ; Lecture 5. Threshold 1, Origins of Big Bang cosmology ; Lecture 6. How did everything begin? ; Lecture 7. Threshold 2, The first stars and galaxies ; Lecture 8. Threshold 3, Making chemical elements ; Lecture 9. Threshold 4, The earth and the solar system ; Lecture 10. The early (...)
     
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  30. Christos C. Evangeliou (2008). The Place of Hellenic Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:61-99.score: 12.0
    The appellation “Western” is, in my view, inappropriate when applied to Ancient Hellas and its greatest product, the Hellenic philosophy. For, as a matter of historical fact, neither the spirit of free inquiry and bold speculation, nor the quest of perfection via autonomous virtuous activity and ethical excellence survived, in the purity of their Hellenic forms, the imposition of inflexible religious doctrines and practices on Christian Europe. The coming of Christianity, with the theocratic proclivity of the Church, especially the hierarchically (...)
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  31. Marcin Karas (2005). Naturalna niezniszczalność ciał niebieskich według św. Toma- sza z Akwinu. Roczniki Filozoficzne 53 (1):109-127.score: 12.0
    The subject of the article is the question of the nature of heavenly bodies in St Thomas Aquinas\' approach. The Dominican thinker, using Aristotle\'s cosmology, tries to present his understanding of the Stagirite\'s theory concerning natural indestructibility of heavenly bodies, which he treats as relatively perfect beings built of ether and indestructible in the world of nature, although they are contingent and created by God. The issue proves the Angelic Doctor\'s independence and self-reliance; studying the universe he not only used (...)
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  32. J. M. M. H. Thijssen, Medieval Cosmologies.score: 12.0
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  33. Michael Ward (2010). Planet Narnia: The Seven Heavens in the Imagination of C. S. Lewis. OUP USA.score: 12.0
    For over half a century, scholars have laboured to show that C. S. Lewis's famed but apparently disorganised Chronicles of Narnia have an underlying symbolic coherence, pointing to such possible unifying themes as the seven sacraments, the seven deadly sins, and the seven books of Spenser's Faerie Queene. None of these explanations has won general acceptance and the structure of Narnia's symbolism has remained a mystery. -/- Michael Ward has finally solved the enigma. In Planet Narnia he demonstrates that (...) cosmology, a subject which fascinated Lewis throughout his life, provides the imaginative key to the seven novels. Drawing on the whole range of Lewis's writings (including previously unpublished drafts of the Chronicles), Ward reveals how the Narnia stories were designed to express the characteristics of the seven medieval planets - - Jupiter, Mars, Sol, Luna, Mercury, Venus, and Saturn - - planets which Lewis described as "spiritual symbols of permanent value" and "especially worthwhile in our own generation". Using these seven symbols, Lewis secretly constructed the Chronicles so that in each book the plot-line, the ornamental details, and, most important, the portrayal of the Christ-figure of Aslan, all serve to communicate the governing planetary personality. The cosmological theme of each Chronicle is what Lewis called 'the kappa element in romance', the atmospheric essence of a story, everywhere present but nowhere explicit. The reader inhabits this atmosphere and thus imaginatively gains connaître knowledge of the spiritual character which the tale was created to embody. -/- Planet Narnia is a ground-breaking study that will provoke a major revaluation not only of the Chronicles, but of Lewis's whole literary and theological outlook. Ward uncovers a much subtler writer and thinker than has previously been recognized, whose central interests were hiddenness, immanence, and knowledge by acquaintance. (shrink)
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  34. Ernst Cassirer (1963/2000). The Individual and the Cosmos in Renaissance Philosophy. Dover Publications.score: 9.0
    This thought-provoking classic investigates how the Renaissance spirit fundamentally questioned and undermined medieval thought. Of value to students of literature, political theory, history of religious and Reformation thought, and the history of science.
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  35. Tamar Rudavsky (2010). Maimonides. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 9.0
    Life and works -- Language, logic, and the art of demonstration -- What we can say about God -- Philosophical cosmology -- Philosophical anthropology -- Natural and supernatural: prophecy, miracles, and divine will -- Philosophical theology: providence, human freedom, and theodicy -- Morality, politics and the law -- On human felicity.
     
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  36. Kurt Lampe (2005). A Twelfth-Century Text on the Number Nine and Divine Creation: A New Interpretation of Boethian Cosmology? Mediaeval Studies 67 (1):1-26.score: 8.0
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  37. Richard M. Gale & Alexander R. Pruss (1999). A New Cosmological Argument. Religious Studies 35 (4):461-476.score: 7.0
    We will give a new cosmological argument for the existence of a being who, although not proved to be the absolutely perfect God of the great Medieval theists, also is capable of playing the role in the lives of working theists of a being that is a suitable object of worship, adoration, love, respect, and obedience. Unlike the absolutely perfect God, the God whose necessary existence is established by our argument will not be shown to essentially have the divine (...)
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  38. Dcwtd S. Oderberg, A Brief History of Cosmological Arguments.score: 7.0
    There is no such thing as the cosmological argument. Rather, there are several arguments that all proceed from facts or alleged facts concerning causation, change, motion, contingency, or Hnitude in respect of the universe as a whole or processes within it. From them, and from general principles said to govern them, one is led to deduce or infer as highly probable the existence of a cause of the universe (as opposed, say, to a designer or a source of value). Such (...))
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  39. Jonathan Hodge (2005). Against "Revolution" and "Evolution". Journal of the History of Biology 38 (1):101 - 121.score: 6.0
    Those standard historiographic themes of "evolution" and "revolution" need replacing. They perpetuate mid-Victorian scientists' history of science. Historians' history of science does well to take in the long run from the Greek and Hebrew heritages on, and to work at avoiding misleading anachronism and teleology. As an alternative to the usual "evo-revo" themes, a historiography of origins and species, of cosmologies (including microcosmogonies and macrocosmogonies) and ontologies, is developed here. The advantages of such a historiography are illustrated by looking briefly (...)
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  40. Graham Harman (2011). Meillassoux's Virtual Future. Continent 1 (2):78-91.score: 4.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 78-91. This article consists of three parts. First, I will review the major themes of Quentin Meillassoux’s After Finitude . Since some of my readers will have read this book and others not, I will try to strike a balance between clear summary and fresh critique. Second, I discuss an unpublished book by Meillassoux unfamiliar to all readers of this article, except those scant few that may have gone digging in the microfilm archives of the École normale (...)
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  41. Scott Macdonald (1991). Aquinas's Parasitic Cosmological Argument. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 1:119-155.score: 4.0
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  42. Barbara Obrist (2012). Visual Representation and Science Visual Figures of the Universe Between Antiquity and the Early Thirteenth Century. Spontaneous Generations 6 (1):15-23.score: 4.0
    The paper raises the question of the function of visual representations in medieval cosmographical texts. It proposes to view diverse functions of figures in relation to changing discursive environments, including differing philosophical positions and changing social and intellectual contexts. It further suggests a distinction between figures that were elaborated within the highly specialized disciplines of mathematics and philosophy of nature in Greek Antiquity and figures that were instrumental in transmitting accepted world models, thus avoiding the opposition between scientific and (...)
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