Search results for 'Counseling psychologist and client' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kenneth S. Pope (2007). Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling: A Practical Guide. Jossey-Bass.score: 255.0
    Praise for Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling, Third Edition "This is absolutely the best text on professional ethics around. . . . This is a refreshingly open and inviting text that has become a classic in the field." —Derald Wing Sue, professor of psychology, Teachers College, Columbia University "I love this book! And so will therapists, supervisors, and trainees. In fact, it really should be required reading for every mental health professional and aspiring professional. . . . And it (...)
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  2. Kenneth S. Pope (1991). Ethics in Psychotherapy and Counseling: A Practical Guide for Psychologists. Jossey-Bass.score: 139.0
    The comprehensive guide to ethics "An excellent blend of case law, research evidence, down-to-earth principles, and practical examples from two authors with outstanding expertise. Promotes valuable understanding through case illustrations, self-directed exercises, and thoughtful discussion of such issues as cultural diversity."--Dick Suinn, president-elect 1998, American Psychological Association "The scenarios and accompanying questions will prove especially helpful to those who offer courses and workshops concerned with ethics in psychology."--Charles D. Spielberger, former president, American Psychological Association; distinguished research professor of psychology, University (...)
     
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  3. Gerald P. Koocher (2008). Ethics in Psychology and the Mental Health Professions: Standards and Cases. Oxford University Press.score: 87.0
    Psychologists today must deal with a broad range of ethical issues--from charging fees to maintaining a client's confidentiality, and from conducting research to respecting clients, colleagues, and students. As the field of psychology has grown in size and scope, the role of ethics has become more important and complex whether the psychologist is involved in teaching, counseling, research, or practice. Now this most widely read and cited ethics text in psychology has been revised to reflect the ethics (...)
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  4. Fuat S. Oduncu (2002). The Role of Non-Directiveness in Genetic Counseling. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (1):53-63.score: 66.0
    When the complete human genomehas been sequenced, everyone of us will becomea potential candidate for genetic counselingand testing. Within a short period of timeeveryone will obtain his personal geneticpassport identifying deleterious andsusceptibility genes. With the availability ofpresymptomatic tests for late-onset disordersand the possibilities of prevention andtreatment, the conflict between directivenessand non-directiveness will dominate thecounseling setting. Despite general consent onproviding genetic information in a nondirectivefashion to preserve value neutrality andenhance client's autonomy, there is no acceptedcommon definition of what non-directivenessreally is (...)
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  5. Mary Terrell White (1998). Decision-Making Through Dialogue: Reconfiguring Autonomy in Genetic Counseling. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (1):5-19.score: 66.0
    Nondirective genetic counseling developed as a means of promoting informed and independent decision-making. To the extent that it minimizes risks of coercion, this counseling approach effectively respects client autonomy. However, it also permits clients to make partially informed, poorly reasoned or ethically questionable choices, and denies counselors a means of demonstrating accountability for the use of their services. These practical and ethical tensions result from an excessive focus on noncoercion while neglecting the contribution of adequate information and (...)
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  6. Lynne Gabriel (2005). Speaking the Unspeakable: The Ethics of Dual Relationships in Counselling and Psychotherapy. Routledge.score: 64.0
    Are dual relationships always detrimental? Speaking the Unspeakable provides an in-depth exploration of client-practitioner dual relationships, offering critical discussion and sustained narrative on thinking about and being in dual relationships. Lynne Gabriel draws on the experiences of both practitioners and clients to provide a clear summary of the complex and multidimensional nature of dual relationships. The beneficial as well as detrimental potential of such relationships is discussed and illustrated with personal accounts. Subjects covered include: · Roles and boundaries in (...)
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  7. Barabara Biesecker (1998). Future Directions in Genetic Counseling: Practical and Ethical Considerations. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8 (2):145-160.score: 54.0
    : The accelerated discovery of gene mutations that lead to increased risk of disease has led to the rapid development of predictive genetic tests. These tests improve the accuracy of assigning risk, but at a time when intervention or prevention strategies are largely unproved. In coming years, however, data will become increasingly available to guide treatment of genetic diseases. Eventually genetic testing will be performed for common diseases as well as for rare genetic conditions. This will challenge genetic counseling (...)
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  8. Rachel Winograd (2011). The Balance Between Providing Support, Prolonging Suffering, and Promoting Death: Ethical Issues Surrounding Psychological Treatment of a Terminally Ill Client. Ethics and Behavior 22 (1):44 - 59.score: 54.0
    A psychologist with a client who is terminally ill and wishes to discuss end-of-life options, specifically the option of hastening death, is faced with an ethical dilemma as to how to proceed with treatment. Specifically, he or she is bound by the American Psychological Association's (2002) potentially conflicting Principles A and E, which advise a psychologist to ?do no harm? as well as ?respect ? self-determination.? In addition, Standard 4 (Privacy and Confidentiality) mandates that a client's (...)
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  9. Bill LaBauve & Kimberly Rynearson (2001). The Impact of Conceptualization Skills in Counseling Children. Inquiry 20 (3):33-38.score: 54.0
    This article addresses the importance of client conceptualization skills in counseling as well as the limitations of child conceptualization skills in counseling. Furthermore, the article provides a rough overview of the applicable points in Piaget’s theory of cognitive development and a discussion of how these points relate to conceptualization skills in counseling.
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  10. Mark Yarborough, Joan A. Scott & Linda K. Dixon (1989). The Role of Beneficence in Clinical Genetics: Non-Directive Counseling Reconsidered. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 10 (2).score: 54.0
    The popular view of non-directive genetic counseling limits the counselor's role to providing information to clients and assisting families in making decisions in a morally neutral fashion. This view of non-directive genetic counseling is shown to be incomplete. A fuller understanding of what it means to respect autonomy shows that merely respecting client choices does not exhaust the duty. Moreover, the genetic counselor/client relationship should also be governed by the counselor's commitment to the principle of beneficience. (...)
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  11. Marjorie Hall Davis (2008). Structures of Evil Encountered in Pastoral Counseling. Zygon 43 (3):665-680.score: 54.0
    This essay explores some relationships between social structures or systems and the internal psychological structures or systems of individuals. After defining evil, pastoral counseling, and structures or systems, I present examples of persons affected by social systems of power who have sought counseling. I present a form of counseling known as Internal Family System Therapy (IFS) and show with an extended example how I have worked with clients using this approach. In this process the client is (...)
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  12. Sara Waller (2003). Philosophical Counseling. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 10 (2):23-31.score: 54.0
    I offer a method for philosophical counseling that is contrasted with Marinoffs. This version of philosophical counseling is primarily epistemic and suggests therapy as the examination of the justification of a client's beliefs, with a goal of enabling the client to change belief systems if the client so chooses.
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  13. Hakam Al-Shawi (1998). A General Framework For Philosophical Counseling. Philosophy in the Contemporary World 5 (4):1-9.score: 54.0
    This paper presents a general framework for philosophical counseling founded upon the distinction between philosophical discourse and philosophy as a lived experience. Clients enter counseling, usually, philosophically unsophisticated, but with a set of perspectives and a predicament. I outline the two general processes of philosophical counseling that address such a reported predicament.The first process---critique---involves a critical examination of the client’s philosophical perspectives, as they are related to the reported predicament. Through the use of the Socratic method, (...)
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  14. Jon Mills (1999). Ethical Considerations and Training Recommendations for Philosophical Counseling. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (2):149-164.score: 54.0
    Philosophical counseling is a diverse and burgeoning type of mental health service delivery. Despite competing approaches to theory and practice, the field has largely strayed from an ethical critique of its methodology and counselor training requirements. This article outlines several ethical considerations and training recommendations that are proposed to bolster the quality and effectiveness of philosophical practice. As philosophical counseling gains increasing recognition in North America, recently established national organizations in philosophical practice may profit from revisiting their interim (...)
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  15. Marilyn Evans, Vangie Bergum, Stephen Bamforth & Sandra MacPhail (2004). Relational Ethics and Genetic Counseling. Nursing Ethics 11 (5):459-471.score: 54.0
    Genetic counseling is viewed as a therapeutic interrelationship between genetic counselors and their clients. In a previous relational ethics research project, various themes were identified as key components of relational ethics practice grounded in everyday health situations. In this article the relational ethics approach is further explored in the context of genetic counseling to enhance our understanding of how the counselor-client relationship is contextually developed and maintained. Qualitative interviews were conducted with six adult clients undergoing genetic (...) for predictive testing. Engagement, dialogue and presence were revealed as relevant to genetic counselor-client relationships. A relational ethics approach in genetic counseling challenges the concept of nondirectiveness and may enhance the outcome of counseling for both counselor and client. (shrink)
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  16. James Frank-Saraceni (1998). Chaos, Creativity, and Counseling: Aspects of a Transtheoretical Model of the Counseling Process. World Futures 51 (3):361-388.score: 54.0
    Counselors ask their clients to become creative in their personal lives and within their counseling process. The process of counseling is a creative process. Growth is necessary for effective improvement in the counseling process. This paper will examine creativity from the point of view of the affective experience of the creator, and the relationship of this experience to the client in counseling. The position here is that the process of counseling is both a creative (...)
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  17. Chris Sanders (2014). Discussing the Limits of Confidentiality: The Impact of Criminalizing HIV Nondisclosure on Public Health Nurses' Counseling Practices. Public Health Ethics 7 (3):253-260.score: 54.0
    In Canada, there have been a growing number of criminal HIV nondisclosure cases where public health records have been subpoenaed to aid in police investigations and/or to be presented in court as evidence against HIV-positive persons. This has led some to suggest that nurses provide explicit warnings about the limits of confidentiality in relation to crimes related to HIV nondisclosure, while others maintain that a robust account of the limits of confidentiality will undermine the nurse–client relationship and the public (...)
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  18. Elliot D. Cohen (2000). Permitting Suicide of Competent Clients in Counseling Legal and Moral Considerations. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 14 (2):259-273.score: 52.0
    State statutes, case law, and professional codes of ethics in the mental health professions typically stress either a duty or the permissibility of disclosing confidential information in order to prevent clients from seriously harming themselves. These sources are intended to address cases where clients are deemed to be suffering from cognitive dysfunction for which paternalistic intervention, including involuntary hospitalization, is considered necessary to prevent self-destructive behavior.The counselor’s moral and legal responsibility is less apparent when mentally competent clients desire suicide as (...)
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  19. Ann Bernsen, Barbara G. Tabachnick & Kenneth S. Pope (1994). National Survey of Social Workers' Sexual Attraction to Their Clients: Results, Implications, and Comparison to Psychologists. Ethics and Behavior 4 (4):369 – 388.score: 50.0
    A survey form sent to psychologists (Pope, Keith-Spiegel, & Tabachnick, 1986) was adapted and sent to 1,000 clinical social workers (return rate = 45%). Most participants reported sexual attraction to a client, causing (for most) guilt, anxiety, or confusion. Some reported having sexual fantasies about a client while engaging in sex with someone other than a client. Relatively few (3.6% men; 0.5% women) reported sex with a client; training was related to likelihood of offending, though the (...)
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  20. Andrew M. Pomerantz & Dan J. Segrist (2006). The Influence of Payment Method on Psychologists' Diagnostic Decisions Regarding Minimally Impaired Clients. Ethics and Behavior 16 (3):253 – 263.score: 50.0
    Are psychotherapy clients who pay via health insurance more likely to receive Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed. [DSM-IV], American Psychiatric Association, 1994) diagnoses than identical clients who pay out of pocket? Previous research (Kielbasa, Pomerantz, Krohn, & Sullivan, 2004) indicates that when psychologists consider a mildly depressed or anxious client, payment method significantly influences diagnostic decisions. This study extends the scope of the previous study to include clients whose symptoms are even less severe. Independent practitioners (...)
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  21. Benjamin S. Wilfond & Diane Baker (1995). Genetic Counseling, Non-Directiveness, and Clients' Values: Is What Clients Say, What They Mean? Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (2):180.score: 50.0
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  22. Benjamin Wilford & Diane Baker (1995). Meaning What I Say Is Not Saying What I Mean: Genetic Counseling, Non-Directiveness and Clients' Values. Journal of Clinical Ethics 6 (2):181.score: 50.0
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  23. Gerald P. Koocher (1998). Ethics in Psychology: Professional Standards and Cases. Oxford University Press.score: 49.0
    Whether one's interests lie in psychological practice, counseling, research, or the classroom, psychologists today must deal with a broad range of ethical issues--from charging fees to maintaining a client's confidentiality, and from conducting research to respecting clients, colleagues, and students. Now in a new edition, Ethics in Psychology, the most widely read and cited ethics textbook in psychology, considers many of the ethical questions and dilemmas that psychologists encounter in their everyday practice, research, and teaching. The book has (...)
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  24. Shlomit C. Schuster (1999). Philosophy Practice: An Alternative to Counseling and Psychotherapy. Praeger.score: 48.0
    This volume describes the main theoretical aspects of this practice based on an open-ended dialogue between a philosophical practitioner and a client or a group ...
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  25. Randolph B. Pipes (1997). Nonsexual Relationships Between Psychotherapists and Their Former Clients: Obligations of Psychologists. Ethics and Behavior 7 (1):27 – 41.score: 48.0
    This article examines the issue of nonsexual relationships between psychologists and their former therapy clients. What little research is available concerning nonsexual relationships with former clients suggests that psychologists have clear reservations about some of these relationships, especially personal ones and intentional social interactions. Relationships immediately following termination are seen as particularly suspect. Drawing on the literature dealing with multiple relationships in general, and sexual relationships with former clients in particular, a number of arguments are made outlining why psychologists should (...)
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  26. Tim LeBon (2001). Wise Therapy: Philosophy for Counsellors. Continuum.score: 45.0
    Independent on Sunday October 2nd One of the country's lead­ing philosophical counsellers, and chairman of the Society for Philosophy in Practice (SPP), Tim LeBon, said it typically took around six 50 ­minute sessions for a client to move from confusion to resolution. Mr LeBon, who has 'published a book on the subject, Wise Therapy, said philoso­phy was perfectly suited to this type of therapy, dealing as it does with timeless human issues such as love, purpose, happiness and emo­tional challenges. (...)
     
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  27. Amy M. Kielbasa, Andrew M. Pomerantz, Emily J. Krohn & Bryce F. Sullivan (2004). How Does Clients' Method of Payment Influence Psychologists' Diagnostic Decisions? Ethics and Behavior 14 (2):187 – 195.score: 44.0
    To what extent does payment method (managed care vs. out of pocket) influence the likelihood that an independent practitioner will assign a Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (American Psychiatric Association, 1994) diagnosis to a client? When a practitioner does diagnose, how does payment method influence the specific choice of a diagnostic category? Independent practitioners responded to a vignette describing a fictitious client with symptoms of depression or anxiety. In half of the vignettes, the fictitious client (...)
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  28. Jing-Bo Zhao, Jian-Lin Ji, Fang Tang, Qing-Yun Du, Xue-Ling Yang, Zhen-Zhi Yang, Yan-Fei Hou & Xiao-Yuan Zhang (2012). National Survey of Client's Perceptions of Chinese Psychotherapist Practices. Ethics and Behavior 22 (5):362 - 377.score: 43.3
    The present study is a cross-sectional survey that investigates ethical practices among Chinese psychotherapists from the perspective of a large representative sample of Chinese clients (N?=?1,100). In reports from clients, we found that psychotherapists did poorly in providing informed consent and had other ethical difficulties in the therapeutic setting and with dual relationships. We conclude that Chinese culture, especially Confucianism, had significant impact on the attitudes toward the psychotherapists' ethical practices, which complicated ethical dilemmas. It is important for cross-cultural psychotherapists (...)
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  29. Scott Sibary (2006). Counseling Philanthropic Donors. Ethics and Behavior 16 (3):183 – 197.score: 42.0
    People who wish to make direct gifts to charities or other nonprofit organizations are faced with an overwhelming number of choices. There exist several types of sources of information to help potential donors choose whether, where, and how much to give. Each of these has its limitations, and at some point the size of the gift contemplated by the donor can justify the marginal cost of consulting with an advisor, particularly when the donor is already consulting with legal or financial (...)
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  30. Julie Ann Smith, Andrew M. Pomerantz, Jonathan C. Pettibone & Daniel J. Segrist (2012). When Does a Professional Relationship with a Psychologist Begin? An Empirical Investigation. Ethics and Behavior 22 (3):208 - 217.score: 42.0
    Research on multiple relationships by practicing psychologists has typically presumed the presence of a professional relationship and focused on the ethicality of subsequent, nonprofessional relationships. Instead, this study focused on the question of what, exactly, constitutes the professional relationship in the first place. Practicing psychologists and undergraduates responded to vignettes portraying various early stages of interaction between a therapist and a prospective client. Participants' responses indicated that determinations of professional relationship establishment, and the ethicality of subsequent nonprofessional relationships, depended (...)
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  31. Andrew M. Pomerantz (2000). What If Prospective Clients Knew How Managed Care Impacts Psychologists' Practice and Ethics? An Exploratory Study. Ethics and Behavior 10 (2):159 – 171.score: 40.0
    Modal responses to items from a recent survey of independent practitioners regarding the impact of managed care on their practices and ethics (Murphy, DeBernardo, & Shoemaker, 1998) were presented to participants as the responses of a hypothetical independent practitioner. Participants were asked to consider seeing this hypothetical practitioner both before and after being informed of the practitioner's responses to the managed care survey. Results indicate that when participants were informed of the practitioner's views toward managed care, their own attitudes toward (...)
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  32. Alfred Allan & Donald M. Thomson (2010). The Regulation of Sexual Activity Between Psychologists and Their Clients and Former Clients. In Alfred Allan & A. Love (eds.), Ethical Practice in Psychology: Reflections From the Creators of the Aps Code of Ethics. John Wiley. 149--161.score: 40.0
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  33. Rony E. Duncan, Annette C. Hall & Ann Knowles (forthcoming). Ethical Dilemmas of Confidentiality With Adolescent Clients: Case Studies From Psychologists. Ethics and Behavior:1-25.score: 40.0
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  34. Alfred Allan & Don Thomson (2010). The Regulation of Sexual Activity Between Psychologists and Their Clients and Former Clients. In Alfred Allan & A. Love (eds.), Ethical Practice in Psychology: Reflections From the Creators of the Aps Code of Ethics. John Wiley.score: 40.0
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  35. Suzanne Le Mire & Christine Parker (2008). Keeping It in-House: Ethics in the Relationship Between Large Law Firm Lawyers and Their Corporate Clients Through the Eyes of in-House Counsel. Legal Ethics 11 (2):201-229.score: 40.0
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  36. S. Gartner (2010). Staying a Pastor While Talking Like a Psychologist? A Proposal for an Integrative Model. Christian Bioethics 16 (1):48-60.score: 36.0
    This essay contributes to the discussions about the end, or rather reform, of the Counseling Movement. One central problem concerns the question of whether, apart from the positive impact psychology has had on pastoral counseling, this influence may not also have led to an obfuscation of theological profile. This question is addressed in view of the language used in pastoral counseling. First, various implications of the use of psychological terms are exposed insofar as these influence pastors’ professional (...)
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  37. Tim Bond (2000). Standards and Ethics for Counselling in Action. Sage Publications.score: 34.0
    Standards and Ethics for Counselling in Action is the highly acclaimed guide to the major responsibilities which trainees and counselors in practice must be aware of before working with clients. Author Tim Bond outlines the values and ethical principles inherent in counselling and points out that the counselor is at the center of a series of responsibilities: to the client, to him/herself as a counselor and to the wider community. Now fully revised and updated, the second edition examines issues (...)
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  38. Angela M. Liszcz & Mark A. Yarhouse (2005). A Survey on Views of How to Assist with Coming Out as Gay, Changing Same-Sex Behavior or Orientation, and Navigating Sexual Identity Confusion. Ethics and Behavior 15 (2):159 – 179.score: 31.0
    This study is an analysis of 186 psychologists' attitudes on what constitutes ethical practice when counseling clients who present with a range of concerns related to their experience of same-sex attraction and behavior. Three different groups of psychologists were surveyed: generalists, specialists in gay and lesbian issues, and religiously affiliated psychologists. Participants also rated the effectiveness of several professional experiences in providing education, direction, sanctions, or support to regulate the practice of counseling nonheterosexual clients. Significant group differences were (...)
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  39. Sonia M. Suter (1998). Value Neutrality and Nondirectiveness: Comments on "Future Directions in Genetic Counseling". Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8 (2):161-163.score: 30.0
    : Common wisdom in genetic counseling, which is supported by Biesecker, holds that counselors should strive not to influence their clients' decision making. Such a presumption of nondirectiveness is challenged in this commentary.
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  40. Sara Ellenbogen (2006). Wittgenstein and Philosophical Counseling. Philosophical Practice 2 (2):79-85.score: 30.0
    Wittgenstein conceived of philosophy as an activity rather than a subject. Thus, his work is highly relevant to the contemporary philosophical counseling movement. This paper explores the ways in which his views on how to do philosophy shed light on how we can approach philosophical counseling. First, Witgenstein's anti-theoretical approach to conceptual analysis highlights the dangers of interpreting clients? symptoms in light of theory. Second, his notion that "pictures hold us captive" underscores the need to help clients recognize (...)
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  41. Trish Sherwood (2001). Client Experience in Psychotherapy: What Heals and What Harms? Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 1 (2).score: 30.0
    The purpose of this paper is to examine what heals and harms the client in the psychotherapeutic encounter, from the client's perspective. The experience of eight clients was explicated using a model based on Giorgi and Schweitzer. The counselling experienced as healing by clients has at its core a vibrantly warm and honest relationship where the client feels held in the safety of the good heart space of the counsellor. The counsellor is experienced as providing an intense (...)
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  42. Ned Block (1981). Psychologism and Behaviorism. Philosophical Review 90 (1):5-43.score: 24.0
    Let psychologism be the doctrine that whether behavior is intelligent behavior depends on the character of the internal information processing that produces it. More specifically, I mean psychologism to involve the doctrine that two systems could have actual and potential behavior _typical_ of familiar intelligent beings, that the two systems could be exactly alike in their actual and potential behavior, and in their behavioral dispositions and capacities and counterfactual behavioral properties (i.e., what behaviors, behavioral dispositions, and behavioral capacities they would (...)
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  43. Hanoch Ben-Yami (2005). Behaviorism and Psychologism: Why Block's Argument Against Behaviorism is Unsound. Philosophical Psychology 18 (2):179-186.score: 24.0
    Ned Block ((1981). Psychologism and behaviorism. Philosophical Review, 90, 5-43.) argued that a behaviorist conception of intelligence is mistaken, and that the nature of an agent's internal processes is relevant for determining whether the agent has intelligence. He did that by describing a machine which lacks intelligence, yet can answer questions put to it as an intelligent person would. The nature of his machine's internal processes, he concluded, is relevant for determining that it lacks intelligence. I argue against Block (...)
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  44. David Pitt (2009). Intentional Psychologism. Philosophical Studies 146 (1):117 - 138.score: 24.0
    In the past few years, a number of philosophers (notably, Siewert, C. (The significance of consciousness. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1998); Horgan and Tienson (Philosophy of mind: Classical and contemporary readings, Oxford University Press, 2002, pp. 520–533); Pitt 2004) have maintained the following three theses: (1) there is a distinctive sort of phenomenology characteristic of conscious thought, as opposed to other sorts of conscious mental states; (2) different conscious thoughts have different phenomenologies; and (3) thoughts with the same phenomenology have (...)
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  45. Martin Kusch (1995). Psychologism: A Case Study in the Sociology of Philosophical Knowledge. Routledge.score: 24.0
    In the 1890's, when fields such as psychology and philosophy were just emerging, turf wars between the disciplines were common-place. Philosophers widely discounted the possibility that psychology's claim to empirical truth had anything relevant to offer their field. And psychologists, such as the crazed and eccentric Otto Weinegger, often considered themselves philosophers. Freud, it is held, was deeply influenced by his wife, Martha's, uncle, who was also a philosopher. The tension between the fields persisted, until the two fields eventually matured (...)
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  46. Terry Dartnall (2000). Reverse Psychologism, Cognition and Content. Minds and Machines 10 (1):31-52.score: 24.0
    The confusion between cognitive states and the content of cognitive states that gives rise to psychologism also gives rise to reverse psychologism. Weak reverse psychologism says that we can study cognitive states by studying content – for instance, that we can study the mind by studying linguistics or logic. This attitude is endemic in cognitive science and linguistic theory. Strong reverse psychologism says that we can generate cognitive states by giving computers representations that express the content of cognitive states and (...)
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  47. Aleksandar Fatic (2013). Epicurean Ethics as a Foundation for Philosophical Counseling. Philosophical Practice 8 (1):1127–1141.score: 24.0
    The paper discusses the manner and extent to which Epicurean ethics can serve as a general philosophy of life, capable of supporting philosophical practice in the form of philosophical counseling. Unlike the modern age academic philosophy, the philosophical practice movement portrays the philosopher as a personal or corporate adviser, one who helps people make sense of their experiences and find optimum solutions within the context of their values and general preferences. Philosophical counseling may rest on almost any school (...)
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  48. Michael Smith (2003). Humeanism, Psychologism, and the Normative Story. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 67 (2):460–467.score: 24.0
    Jonathan Dancy’s Practical Reality is, I think, best understood as an attempt to undermine our allegiance to these two purported constitutive claims about action. If we must think that psychological states figure in the explanation of action then, according to Dancy, we should suppose that those psychological states are beliefs rather than desire-belief pairs. Dancy thus prefers pure cognitivism to Humeanism. But in fact he thinks that we have no business accepting any form of psychologism in the first place; no (...)
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  49. Susanne Gibson (2006). Respect as Esteem: The Case of Counselling. Res Publica 12 (1):77-95.score: 24.0
    To claim that respect is one of the cornerstones of professional ethics is uncontroversial. However, it has become commonplace in the philosophical literature to distinguish between different kinds of respect. This paper considers the distinction between ‘recognition respect,’ said to be owed to persons as such, and ‘appraisal respect,’ said to be owed to those persons whom merit it, in the context of the professional–client relationship. Using the practice of counselling as an example, it is argued that both kinds (...)
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  50. David B. Resnik, Paul L. Ranelli & Susan P. Resnik (2000). The Conflict Between Ethics and Business in Community Pharmacy: What About Patient Counseling? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 28 (2):179 - 186.score: 24.0
    Patient counseling is a cornerstone of ethical pharmacy practice and high quality pharmaceutical care. Counseling promotes patient compliance with prescription regimens and prevents dangerous drug interactions and medication errors. Counseling also promotes informed consent and protects pharmacists against legal risks. However, economic, social, and technological changes in pharmacy practice often force community pharmacists to choose between their professional obligations to counsel patients and business objectives. State and federal legislatures have enacted laws that require pharmacists to counsel patients, (...)
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