Search results for 'Courage' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Mark L. Howe, Mary L. Courage & Carole Peterson (1994). How Can I Remember When "I" Wasn′T There: Long-Term Retention of Traumatic Experiences and Emergence of the Cognitive Self. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (3-4):327-355.score: 30.0
  2. Richard A. Courage (2012). Re-Presenting Racial Reality:Chicago's New (Media) Negro Artists of the Depression Era. Technoetic Arts 10 (2):309-318.score: 30.0
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  3. On Manly Courage (forthcoming). A Study of Plato's Laches. Philosophical Explorations. Carbondale, Il: Southern Illinois University Press.score: 30.0
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  4. Howard Harris (2001). Content Analysis of Secondary Data: A Study of Courage in Managerial Decision Making. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 34 (3-4):191 - 208.score: 24.0
    Empirical studies in business ethics often rely on self-reported data, but this reliance is open to criticism. Responses to questionnaires and interviews may be influenced by the subject''s view of what the researcher might want to hear, by a reluctance to talk about sensitive ethical issues, and by imperfect recall. This paper reviews the extent to which published research in business ethics relies on interviews and questionnaires, and then explores the possibilities of using secondary data, such as company documents and (...)
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  5. Linda R. Rabieh (2006). Plato and the Virtue of Courage. Johns Hopkins University Press.score: 24.0
    Plato and the Virtue of Courage canvasses contemporary discussions of courage and offers a new and controversial account of Plato's treatment of the concept. Linda R. Rabieh examines Plato's two main thematic discussions of courage, in the Laches and the Republic, and discovers that the two dialogues together yield a coherent, unified treatment of courage that explores a variety of vexing questions: Can courage be separated from justice, so that one can act courageously while advancing (...)
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  6. Leslie E. Sekerka, Richard P. Bagozzi & Richard Charnigo (2009). Facing Ethical Challenges in the Workplace: Conceptualizing and Measuring Professional Moral Courage. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):565 - 579.score: 24.0
    Scholars have shown renewed interest in the construct of courage. Recent studies have explored its theoretical underpinnings and measurement. Yet courage is generally discussed in its broad form to include physical, psychological, and moral features. To understand a more practical form of moral courage, research is needed to uncover how ethical challenges are effectively managed in organizational settings. We argue that professional moral courage (PMC) is a managerial competency. To describe it and derive items for scale (...)
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  7. Angela Hobbs (2000/2006). Plato and the Hero: Courage, Manliness, and the Impersonal Good. Cambridge University Press.score: 24.0
    Plato's thinking on courage, manliness and heroism is both profound and central to his work, but these areas of his thought remain underexplored. This book examines his developing critique of the notions and embodiments of manliness prevalent in his culture (particularly those in Homer), and his attempt to redefine such notions in accordance with his ethical, psychological and metaphysical principles. It further seeks to locate the discussion within the framework of Plato's general approach to ethics.
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  8. Peter Olsthoorn (2007). Courage in the Military: Physical and Moral. Journal of Military Ethics 6 (4):270-279.score: 24.0
    The first section of this article argues that the best-known definition of physical courage, stemming from Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics, is less than fit for today's military. Having done so, a short outline is given of more ?scientific? approaches to physical courage, drawing mainly on insights offered by psychologists, and of the problems that are inherent to these approaches. Subsequently, the article turns to a topic that is often paid lip service to in the military, yet remains somewhat hard (...)
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  9. Douglas R. May, Matthew T. Luth & Catherine E. Schwoerer (2013). The Influence of Business Ethics Education on Moral Efficacy, Moral Meaningfulness, and Moral Courage: A Quasi-Experimental Study. Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.score: 24.0
    The research described here contributes to the extant empirical research on business ethics education by examining outcomes drawn from the literature on positive organizational scholarship (POS). The general research question explored is whether a course on ethical decision-making in business could positively influence students’ confidence in their abilities to handle ethical problems at work (i.e., moral efficacy), boost the relative importance of ethics in their work lives (i.e., moral meaningfulness), and encourage them to be more courageous in raising ethical problems (...)
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  10. Verna M. Ehret (2014). Globalization, Redemption, and the Dialectics of Courage. Sophia 53 (1):67-80.score: 24.0
    This essay explores forms of religious narrative that shape self-understanding and engagement with the world through the idea of redemption. An analysis of the landscape of religious perspectives within the context of globalization shows a bifurcation between competing notions of redemption in fundamentalist and postmodern narratives. Where fundamentalism uses meta-narrative that is hyper-theistic, postmodernism uses contextual narratives that deconstruct narrative and can lose a sense of the transcendent. The purpose of the essay is to show how these two competing notions (...)
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  11. Rachel Fredericks (2014). Courage as an Environmental Virtue. Environmental Ethics 36 (3):339-355.score: 24.0
    We should give courage a more significant place in our understanding of how familiar virtues can and should be reshaped to capture what it is to be virtuous relative to the environment. Matthew Pianalto’s account of moral courage helps explain what a specifically environmental form of moral courage would look like. There are three benefits to be gained by recognizing courage as an environmental virtue: (1) it helps us to recognize the high stakes nature of much (...)
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  12. Richard Avramenko (2011). Courage: The Politics of Life and Limb. University of Notre Dame Press.score: 24.0
    Preface -- (Re)introducing courage -- Martial courage and honor -- Political courage and justice -- Moral courage and autonomy -- Economic courage and wealth -- The aftermath.
     
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  13. Per Bauhn (2003). The Value of Courage. Nordic Academic Press.score: 24.0
    Combining in-depth analysis with strikingly apt examples of the role that courage plays in the life of human beings, this major contribution to moral philosophy argues that courage is necessary to personal achievement as well as to the common good of a civic community. Bauhn insists that courage is necessary for reinforcing people's understanding of themselves as autonomous agents, which is in turn necessary for countering widespread feelings of alienation and depression. He defines courage as the (...)
     
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  14. Joshua Wilburn (forthcoming). Courage and the Spirited Part of the Soul in Plato's Republic. Philosophers' Imprint.score: 24.0
    In this paper I argue that the Republic’s account of courage remains committed to the view that knowledge, or even true belief, about how it is best to act is sufficient for correct behavior. I thus defend continuity between the Republic’s account of courage and that found in the Protagoras. I suggest that in the Republic Plato attempts to identify a psychic source of stability for belief, the spirited part of the soul, whose function in the virtue of (...)
     
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  15. L. U. Qiaoying (2013). Aquinas's Transformation of the Virtue of Courage. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 8 (3):471-484.score: 21.0
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  16. Michelle Harbour & Veronika Kisfalvi (2014). In the Eye of the Beholder: An Exploration of Managerial Courage. Journal of Business Ethics 119 (4):493-515.score: 21.0
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  17. Paul Tillich (2000/1977). The Courage to Be. Yale University Press.score: 21.0
    This edition includes a new introduction by Peter J. Gomes that reflects on the impact of this book in the years since it was written.
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  18. Elizabeth Pybus (1991). Human Goodness: Generosity and Courage. Harvester Wheatsheaf.score: 21.0
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  19. Christopher Norris (2001). 'Courage Not Under Fire': Realism, Anti-Realism, and the Epistemological Virtues. Inquiry 44 (3):269 – 290.score: 18.0
    This article offers a critical perspective on two lines of thought in recent epistemology and philosophy of science, namely Michael Dummett?s anti-realist approach to issues of truth, meaning, and knowledge and Bas van Fraassen?s influential programme of ?constructive empiricism?. While not denying the salient differences between them (the one a metaphysical doctrine premised on logicolinguistic considerations, the other a thesis primarily concerned with the scope and limits of empirical inquiry) it shows how they converge on a sceptical outlook concerning the (...)
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  20. Manyul Im (2004). Moral Knowledge and Self Control in Mengzi: Rectitude, Courage, and Qi. Asian Philosophy 14 (1):59 – 77.score: 18.0
    In this paper, I reveal systematic aspects of the moral epistemology of the Warring States Confucian, Mengzi. Mengzi thinks moral knowledge is 'internally' available to humans because it is acquired through normative dictates built into the human heart-mind (xin). Those dictates are capable of motivating and justifying an agent's normative categorizations. Such dictates are linked to Mengzi's conception of human nature (ren xing) as good. I then interpret Mengzi's difficult discussion of courage and qi in Mengzi 2A: 2 as (...)
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  21. Lisheng Chen (2010). Courage in the Analects : A Genealogical Survey of the Confucian Virtue of Courage. [REVIEW] Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (1):1-30.score: 18.0
    The different meanings of “courage” in The Analects were expressed in Confucius’ remark on Zilu’s bravery. The typological analysis of courage in Mencius and Xunzi focused on the shaping of the personalities of brave persons. “Great courage” and “superior courage”, as the virtues of “great men” or “ shi junzi 士君子 (intellectuals with noble characters)”, exhibit not only the uprightness of the “internal sagacity”, but also the rich implications of the “external kingship”. The prototype of these (...)
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  22. Holloway Sparks (1997). Dissident Citizenship: Democratic Theory, Political Courage, and Activist Women. Hypatia 12 (4):74-110.score: 18.0
    In this essay, I argue that contemporary democratic theory gives insufficient attention to the important contributions dissenting citizens make to democratic life. Guided by the dissident practices of activist women, I develop a more expansive conception of citizenship that recognizes dissent and an ethic of political courage as vital elements of democratic participation. I illustrate how this perspective on citizenship recasts and reclaims women's courageous dissidence by reconsidering the well-known story of Rosa Parks.
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  23. Shigeru Yonezawa (2012). Socratic Courage in Plato's Socratic Dialogues. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (4):645 - 665.score: 18.0
    This article considers Socrates's conception of courage in Plato's Socratic dialogues. Although the Laches, which is the only dialogue devoted in toto to a pursuit of the definition of courage, does not explicitly provide Socrates's definition of courage, I shall point out clues therein which contribute to an understanding of Socrates's conception of courage. The Protagoras is a peculiar dialogue in which Socrates himself offers a definition of courage. Attending to the dramatic structure and personalities (...)
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  24. Sean T. Hannah, Bruce J. Avolio & Fred O. Walumbwa (2011). Relationships Between Authentic Leadership, Moral Courage, and Ethical and Pro-Social Behaviors. Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):555-578.score: 18.0
    Organizations constitute morally-complex environments, requiring organization members to possess levels of moral courage sufficient to promote their ethical action, while refraining from unethical actions when faced with temptations or pressures. Using a sample drawn from a military context, we explored the antecedents and consequences of moral courage. Results from this four-month field study demonstrated that authentic leadership was positively related to followers’ displays of moral courage. Further, followers’ moral courage fully mediated the effects of authentic leadership (...)
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  25. Jonathan J. Sanford (2010). Are You Man Enough? Aristotle and Courage. International Philosophical Quarterly 50 (4):431-445.score: 18.0
    There are four features to Aristotle’s account of courage that appear peculiar when compared to our own intuitions about this virtue: (1) his account of courage seems not, on its surface, to fit a eudaimonist model, (2) courage is restricted to a surprisingly small number of actions, (3) this restriction, among other things, excludes women and non-combatant men from ever exercising this virtue, and (4) courage is counted as virtuous because of its nobility and beauty. In (...)
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  26. Matthew Pianalto (2012). Moral Courage and Facing Others. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (2):165-184.score: 18.0
    Abstract Moral courage involves acting in the service of one?s convictions, in spite of the risk of retaliation or punishment. I suggest that moral courage also involves a capacity to face others as moral agents, and thus in a manner that does not objectify them. A moral stand can only be taken toward another moral agent. Often, we find ourselves unable to face others in this way, because to do so is frightening, or because we are consumed by (...)
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  27. Per Bauhn (2007). Two Concepts of Courage. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1:65-68.score: 18.0
    In this paper I intend to present two concepts of courage, with the purpose of introducing two different ways in which the classical virtue of courage may serve goals of personal achievement and goals of collective flourishing respectively. The two forms of courage that I will distinguish are the courage of creativity and the courage of conviction, respectively. The courage of creativity is the ability to confront the fear of failure, this ability being directed (...)
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  28. Stanley Raffel (2011). The Interplay of Courage and Reason in Moral Action. History of the Human Sciences 24 (5):89-102.score: 18.0
    This article argues that both courage and reason are necessary aspects of moral action. It begins by examining Plato’s changing conceptions of these two virtues, and, in particular, the settled view he arrives at in The Statesman. Sloterdijk’s recent attempt in his book advocating rage to appropriate this dialogue in order to criticize Habermas is then considered. I suggest, by interpreting various claims by these two authors, that neither understands that both reason and courage have essential roles in (...)
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  29. Debra R. Comer & Gina Vega (2005). An Experiential Exercise That Introduces the Concept of the Personal Ethical Threshold to Develop Moral Courage. Journal of Business Ethics Education 2 (2):171-197.score: 18.0
    This paper presents an experiential exercise introducing the concept of the personal ethical threshold (PET) to help explain why moral behavior does not always follow moral intention. An individual’s PET represents the individual’s vulnerability to situational factors, i.e., how little or much it takes for members of organizations to cross their proverbial line to act in a way they deem unethical. The PET reflects the interplay among the situation, the particular ethical issue, and the individual. Exploring the PET can help (...)
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  30. Mavis Biss (2013). Radical Moral Imagination: Courage, Hope, and Articulation. Hypatia 28 (4):937-954.score: 18.0
    This paper develops the basis for a new account of radical moral imagination, understood as the transformation of moral understandings through creative response to the sensed inadequacy of one's moral concepts or morally significant appraisals of lived experience. Against Miranda Fricker, I argue that this kind of transition from moral perplexity to increased moral insight is not primarily a matter of the “top-down” use of concepts. Against Susan Babbitt, I argue that it is not primarily a matter of “bottom-up” intuitive (...)
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  31. Michael J. Naughton & Jeffrey R. Cornwall (2006). The Virtue of Courage in Entrepreneurship. Business Ethics Quarterly 16 (1):69-93.score: 18.0
    The paper examines the problematic understanding of “risk” in entrepreneurial literature that locates courage in either the loss orgain of having or in the difficulty and hardship of the doing. We argue in this paper that what is lost in this vernacular view of courage is a deeper notion of the subjective dimension of work and the social need of society. Grounded within the Catholic social and moral tradition, we find a richer notion of courage, which in (...)
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  32. Xinyan Jiang (2007). Courage and Self-Control. The Proceedings of the Twenty-First World Congress of Philosophy 1:59-64.score: 18.0
    An important question about the nature of courage is whether it is a form of self-control. In this paper I argue that there are different kinds of courage and therefore the question whether courage is a form of self-control cannot be given a uniform answer. Courage exhibited in all cases may be classified as either spontaneous or deliberative courage. Spontaneous courage is not a form of self-control and usually is called for in emergency situations. (...)
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  33. Xinyan Jiang (2012). Confucius's View of Courage. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):44-59.score: 18.0
    This article discusses Confucius's view of courage in comparison with Aristotle's and Neo-Confucians'. It proposes the following arguments: (i) Confucius's conception of courage is much broader than Aristotle's, since it does not confine courage to the category of martial virtue and moral excellence that presupposes a noble motive; (ii) both Confucius's and Aristotle's conceptions of courage hold that courage is concerned with the fear of external threats but not the strength in self-improvement as Neo-Confucians have (...)
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  34. Jerzy Brzeziński, Andrzej Klawiter, Theo A. F. Kuipers, Krzysztof Łastowski, Katarzyna Paprzycka & Piotr Przybysz (eds.) (2007). The Courage of Doing Philosophy: Essays Dedicated to Leszek Nowak. Rodopi.score: 18.0
    Table of ContentsAndrzej KLAWITER, Krzystof #ASTOWSKI: Introduction: Originality, Courage and Responsibility List of Books by Leszek NowakSelected Bibliography of Leszek Nowak's WritingsScience and Idealization Theo A.F. KUIPERS: On Two ...
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  35. Earl E. Shelp (1983). Courage and Tragedy in Clinical Medicine. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (4):417-429.score: 18.0
    The relationship between medical clinicians and patients is described as potentially tragic in nature and a context in which courage can be a relevant virtue. Danger, risk, uncertainty, and choice are presented as features of clinical relationships that also function as necessary conditions for courage. The clinician is seen as a ‘sustaining presence’ who has duties of ‘encouragement’ with respect to patients. The patient is seen to have a duty to learn the condition of human existence which can (...)
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  36. V. Dura-Vila (2014). Courage in Art Appreciation: A Humean Perspective. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (1):77-95.score: 18.0
    In this article I argue that a high capacity for courage, in the sense of the strength of character that enables one to face distress, angst or psychological pain, is required of Hume’s ideal critics just as the other well-known five characteristics are. I also explore the implications of my proposal for several aspects of Hume’s aesthetics, including the one brought into relief by Shelley’s interpretation of Hume along the lines of distinguishing between the perceptual and affective stages in (...)
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  37. David Christensen, Jeff Barnes & David Rees (2007). Developing Resolve to Have Moral Courage. Journal of Business Ethics Education 4:79-96.score: 18.0
    Ethics research literature often uses Rest’s Four Component Model of ethical behavior as a framework to teach business and accounting ethics. Moral motivation, including resolve to have moral courage, is the third component of the model and is the least-tested component in ethics research. Using a quasi-experimental design with pretest and posttest measurements, we compare the effectiveness of several methods (traditional, exhortation, reflection, moral exemplar) for developing resolve to have moral courage in 211 accounting students during one semester. (...)
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  38. Inga-Britt Lindh, António Barbosa da Silva, Agneta Berg & Elisabeth Severinsson (2010). Courage and Nursing Practice: A Theoretical Analysis. Nursing Ethics 17 (5):551-565.score: 18.0
    This article aims to deepen the understanding of courage through a theoretical analysis of classical philosophers’ work and a review of published and unpublished empirical research on courage in nursing. The authors sought answers to questions regarding how courage is understood from a philosophical viewpoint and how it is expressed in nursing actions. Four aspects were identified as relevant to a deeper understanding of courage in nursing practice: courage as an ontological concept, a moral virtue, (...)
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  39. Nicholas Tampio (2012). Kantian Courage: Advancing the Enlightenment in Contemporary Political Theory. Fordham University Press.score: 18.0
    How may progressive political theorists advance the Enlightenment after Darwin shifted the conversation about human nature in the nineteenth century, the Holocaust displayed barbarity at the historical center of the Enlightenment, and 9/11 showed the need to modify the ideals and strategies of the Enlightenment? Kantian Courage considers how several figures in contemporary political theory--including John Rawls, Gilles Deleuze, and Tariq Ramadan--do just this as they continue Immanuel Kant's legacy.
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  40. Mikko Tolonen (2014). The Gothic Origin of Modern Civility: Mandeville and the Scots on Courage. Philosophical Explorations 12 (1):51-69.score: 18.0
    This paper seeks to establish that Bernard Mandeville's ideas on courage and honour shaped the Scottish debate about ancients and moderns by formulating a perspective how eighteenth-century civil societies grew large, luxurious and feminine without losing their ability to wage war. My focus is on Mandeville's positive influence on David Hume, whose writings were a springboard for many Mandevillean ideas in Scotland. In contrast to a recent claim in scholarship, Hume aimed to discredit, instead of developing, Shaftesburyan ideas of (...)
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  41. Jerry Calton, Steve Payne & Sandra Waddock (2006). Finding the Courage to Teach From the Heart. Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:283-285.score: 18.0
    This interactive teaching workshop explored what it means to “teach from the heart.” It adopted the format of the wisdom circle to ask participants to share peak teaching experiences so that they could reflect on what their stories reveal about their inner selves as teachers. The hope was that, by learning how to speak with their “authentic” voices, participants could gain the insight and courage needed to better connect with their students as co-learners.
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  42. Ioannis Evrigenis (2007). Easier Said Than Done: Socratic Courage and the Fear of Death. History of Political Thought 28 (3):379-401.score: 18.0
    Plato's Laches, the dialogue devoted to the discovery of courage, is generally considered a failure, as the interlocutors' various definitions ultimately prove insufficient. Laches, however, notes that a definition of this kind can only be assessed by considering whether the speaker's words and deeds are in harmony. In fact he goes one step further, and admits that deeds are far more persuasive than words. He therefore declares that he is willing to let Socrates, whose deeds on the battlefield speak (...)
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  43. Geoffrey Scarre (2010). On Courage. Routledge.score: 18.0
    What is courage and why is it one of the oldest and most universally admired virtues? How is it relevant in the world today, and what contemporary forms does it take? In this insightful and crisply written book, Geoffrey Scarre examines these questions and many more. He begins by defining courage, asking how it differs from fearlessness, recklessness and fortitude, and why people are often more willing to ascribe it to others than to avow it for themselves. He (...)
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  44. Andrei G. Zavaliy & Michael Aristidou (2014). Courage: A Modern Look at an Ancient Virtue. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (2):174-189.score: 18.0
    The purpose of this article is twofold: to demystify the ancient concept of courage, making it more palpable for the modern reader, and to suggest the reasonably specific constraints that would restrict the contemporary tendency of indiscriminate attribution of this virtue. The discussion of courage will incorporate both the classical interpretations of this trait of character, and the empirical studies into the complex relation between the emotion of fear and behavior. The Aristotelian thesis that courage consists in (...)
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  45. Ryan K. Balot (2014). Courage in the Democratic Polis: Ideology and Critique in Classical Athens. Oup Usa.score: 18.0
    In this careful and compelling study, Ryan K. Balot brings together political theory, classical history, and ancient philosophy in order to re-conceive of courage as a specifically democratic virtue.
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  46. Antonella Serena Comba (forthcoming). Aspects of Fear and Courage in Some Texts of the Buddhist Canon in Pāli. Governare la Paura. Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies.score: 18.0
    In the Pāli Canon fear is a twofold mental factor: it can be an obstacle to the liberation’s path or a spur for awareness. This paper cIn the Pāli Canon fear is a twofold mental factor: it can be an obstacle to the liberation’s path or a spur for awareness. This paper collects some examples – the story of Anāthapiṇḍaka, the encounters between Māra and the Buddha or his disciples – of the way in which fear can be turned into (...)
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  47. Paul Henry Carr (2001). Science and Religion: Original Unity and the Courage to Create. Zygon 36 (2):255-259.score: 15.0
  48. Leslie E. Sekerka & Richard P. Bagozzi (2007). Moral Courage in the Workplace: Moving to and From the Desire and Decision to Act. Business Ethics 16 (2):132–149.score: 15.0
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  49. Nestor Turcotte (2005). Guy Boissard, Quelle neutralité face à l'horreur ? Le courage de Charles Journet. Préface par René Rémond, postface par Georges Cottier, o.p. Saint-Maurice, Éditions Saint-Augustin, 2000, 456 p.Guy Boissard, Quelle neutralité face à l'horreur ? Le courage de Charles Journet. Préface par René Rémond, postface par Georges Cottier, o.p. Saint-Maurice, Éditions Saint-Augustin, 2000, 456 p. [REVIEW] Laval Théologique et Philosophique 61 (3):657-659.score: 15.0
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  50. Daniel Putman (2001). The Emotions of Courage. Journal of Social Philosophy 32 (4):463–470.score: 15.0
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