Search results for 'Craig Boardman' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Craig Boardman & Barry Bozeman (2011). Broad Impacts and Narrow Perspectives: Passing the Buck on Science and Social Impacts. Social Epistemology 23 (3):183-198.score: 240.0
    We provide a critical assessment of the National Science Foundation's (NSF) “broader impacts criterion” for peer review, which has met with resistance from the scientific community and been characterized as unlikely to have much positive effect due to poor implementation and adherence to the linear model heuristic for innovation. In our view, the weakness of NSF's approach owes less to these issues than to the misguided assumption that the peer review process can be used to leverage more societal value from (...)
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  2. Barry Bozeman & Craig Boardman (2009). Broad Impacts and Narrow Perspectives: Passing the Buck on Science and Social Impacts. Social Epistemology 23 (3):183-198.score: 240.0
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  3. William Lane Craig (2005). Is “Craig's Contentious Suggestion” Really so Implausible? Faith and Philosophy 22 (3):358-362.score: 180.0
    Raymond Van Arragon considers my my suggestion that most of those who never have the opportunity to accept Christ during their earthly lives suffer from transworld damnation, and he offers four different interpretations of that notion. He argues that at least three of these interpretations are such that on them the suggestion becomes implausible. I maintain that once my suggestion is properly understood, then, despite Van Arragon’s misgivings, it ought not to be thought implausible even on the first two, boldest (...)
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  4. David M. Craig (2003). Comment by David M. Craig. Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (1):153-158.score: 180.0
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  5. William Craig (1971). Review: Aubert Daigneault, Freedom in Polyadic Algebras and Two Theorems of Beth and Craig; Aubert Daigneault, On Automorphisms of Polyadic Algebras. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (2):337-338.score: 180.0
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  6. William Lane Craig (2006). J. Howard Sobel on the Kalam Cosmological Argument. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 36 (4):565-84.score: 90.0
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  7. Edward Craig (1990). Knowledge and the State of Nature: An Essay in Conceptual Synthesis. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    In this illuminating study Craig argues that the standard practice of analyzing the concept of knowledge has radical defects--arbitrary restriction of the subject matter and risky theoretical presuppositions. He proposes a new approach similar to the "state-of-nature" method found in political theory, building the concept up from a hypothesis about its social function and the needs it fulfills. Shedding light on much that philosophers have written about knowledge, its analysis and the obstacles to its analysis, and the debate over (...)
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  8. William Lane Craig & James Porter Moreland (eds.) (2000/2002). Naturalism: A Critical Analysis. Routledge.score: 60.0
    Craig and Moreland present a rigorous analysis and critique of the major varieties of contemporary philosophical naturalism and advocate that it should be abandoned in light of the serious difficulties raised against it. The contributors draw on a wide range of topics including: epistemology, philosophy of science, value theory to basic analytic ontology, philosophy of mind and agency, and natural theology.
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  9. William Lane Craig (2004). God?: A Debate Between a Christian and an Atheist. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    The question of whether or not God exists is endlessly fascinating and profoundly important. Now two articulate spokesmen--one a Christian, the other an atheist--duel over God's existence in a lively and illuminating battle of ideas. In God?, William Lane Craig and Walter Sinnott-Armstrong bring to the printed page two debates they held before live audiences, preserving all the wit, clarity, and immediacy of their public exchanges. With none of the opaque discourse of academic logicians and divinity-school theologians, the authors (...)
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  10. William Lane Craig (1993). Theism, Atheism, and Big Bang Cosmology. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    Contemporary science presents us with the remarkable theory that the universe began to exist about fifteen billion years ago with a cataclysmic explosion called "the Big Bang." The question of whether Big Bang cosmology supports theism or atheism has long been a matter of discussion among the general public and in popular science books, but has received scant attention from philosophers. This book sets out to fill this gap by means of a sustained debate between two philosophers, William Lane (...) and Quentin Smith, who defend opposing positions. Craig argues that the Big Bang that began the universe was created by God, while Smith argues that the Big Bang has no cause. Alternating chapters by the two philosophers criticize and attempt to refute preceding arguments. Their arguments are based on Einstein's theory of relativity and include a discussion of the new quantum cosmology recently developed by Stephen Hawking and popularized in A Brief History of Time. (shrink)
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  11. Edward Craig (2009). Philosophy: A Brief Insight. Sterling Pub..score: 60.0
    How should we live? What really exists? And how do we know for sure? In this lively and engaging study, Edward Craig argues that learning philosophy is merely a matter of broadening and deepening what most of us do already. But he also shows that philosophy is no mere intellectual pastime: thinkers such as Plato, the Buddhist sages, Descartes, Hobbes, Hume, Hegel, Darwin, Mill, and de Beauvoir responded to real needs and events—and many of their concerns shape our daily (...)
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  12. Edward Craig (1987). The Mind of God and the Works of Man. Clarendon Press.score: 60.0
    What is the connection between philosophy as studied in universities and those general views of man and reality which are commonly considered "philosophy"? Through his attempt to rediscover this connection, Craig offers a view of philosophy and its history since the early 17th century. Craig discusses the two contrary visions of man's essential nature that dominated this period--one portraying man as made in the image of God and required to resemble him as closely as possible, the (...)
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  13. William Lane Craig (2000). The Tensed Theory of Time : A Critical Examination. Kluwer Academic.score: 60.0
    In this book and the companion volume The Tenseless Theory of Time: A Critical Examination, Craig undertakes the first thorough appraisal of the arguments for and against the tensed and tenseless theories of time.
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  14. Barry M. Craig (2014). Reflections on the Readings of Sundays and Feasts: June-August. Australasian Catholic Record, The 91 (2):232.score: 60.0
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  15. Robert P. Craig (1974). Issues in Philosophy and Education. New York,Mss Information Corp..score: 60.0
    Rogers, C. R. and Skinner, B. F. Some issues concerning the control of human behavior.--Broudy, H. S. Didactics, heuristics, and philetics.--Craig, R. An analysis of the psychology of moral development of Lawrence Kohlberg.--Scudder, J. R., Jr. Freedom with authority: a Buber model for teaching.--Hook, S. Some educational attitudes and poses.--Strike, K. A. Freedom, autonomy, and teaching.--Elkind, D. Piaget and Montessori.--Raywid, M. A. Irrationalism and the new reformism.--Doll, W. E., Jr. A methodology of experience: the process of inquiry.--Neff, F. C. (...)
     
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  16. Megan Craig (2010). Levinas and James: Toward a Pragmatic Phenomenology. Indiana University Press.score: 60.0
    Bringing to light new facets in the philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas and William James, Megan Craig explores intersections between French phenomenology and American pragmatism.
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  17. William Lane Craig (1999). A Swift and Simple Refutation of the Kalam Cosmological Argument? Religious Studies 35 (1):57-72.score: 30.0
    John Taylor complains that the "Kalam" cosmological argument gives the appearance of being a swift and simple demonstration of the existence of a Creator of the universe, whereas in fact a convincing argument involving the premiss that the universe began to exist is very difficult to achieve. But Taylor's proffered defeaters of the premisses of the philosophical arguments for the beginning of the universe are themselves typically undercut due to Taylor's inadvertence to alternatives open to the defender of the "Kalam" (...)
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  18. William Lane Craig (1978). A Further Critique of Reichenbach's Cosmological Argument. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 9 (1):53 - 60.score: 30.0
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  19. William Lane Craig (1988). Barrow and Tipler on the Anthropic Principle Vs. Divine Design. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 39 (3):389-395.score: 30.0
    Barrow and Tipler’s contention that the Anthropic Principle is obviously true and removes the need for an explanation of fine-tuning fails because the Principle is trivially true, and only within the context of a World Ensemble, whose existence is not obvious, does a selection effect become significant. Their objections to divine design as an explanation of fine-tuning are seen to be misconceived.
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  20. William Lane Craig (1986). Temporal Necessity; Hard Facts/Soft Facts. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 20 (2/3):65 - 91.score: 30.0
    In conclusion, then, the notion of temporal necessity is certainly queer and perhaps a misnomer. It really has little to do with temporality per se and everything to do with counterfactual openness or closedness. We have seen that the future is as unalterable as the past, but that this purely logical truth is not antithetical to freedom or contingency. Moreover, we have found certain past facts are counterfactually open in that were future events or actualities to be other than they (...)
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  21. William Craig (1957). Three Uses of the Herbrand-Gentzen Theorem in Relating Model Theory and Proof Theory. Journal of Symbolic Logic 22 (3):269-285.score: 30.0
  22. William Lane Craig (1998). Mctaggart's Paradox and the Problem of Temporary Intrinsics. Analysis 58 (2):122–127.score: 30.0
  23. William Lane Craig (1988). Tachyons, Time Travel, and Divine Omniscience. Journal of Philosophy 85 (3):135-150.score: 30.0
  24. E. J. Craig (1968). Berkeley's Attack on Abstract Ideas. Philosophical Review 77 (4):425-437.score: 30.0
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  25. William Lane Craig (1998). Divine Timelessness and Personhood. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 43 (2):109-124.score: 30.0
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  26. William S. Boardman (1993). The Relativity of Perceptual Knowledge. Synthese 94 (2):145-169.score: 30.0
    Since the most promising path to a solution to the problem of skepticism regarding perceptual knowledge seems to rest on a sharp distinction between perceiving and inferring, I begin by clarifying and defending that distinction. Next, I discuss the chief obstacle to success by this path, the difficulty in making the required distinction between merely logical possibilities that one is mistaken and the real (Austin) or relevant (Dretske) possibilities which would exclude knowledge. I argue that this distinction cannot be drawn (...)
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  27. William S. Boardman (1979). Dreams, Dramas, and Scepticism. Philosophical Quarterly 29 (116):220-228.score: 30.0
    Malcolm;[1] but the sharp attacks in the last decade on Malcolm's assumptions have led some philosophers to suppose that Descartes' dreaming problem is a cogent support for scepticism. [2] In this paper, I hope to dispose of the problem without using controversial assumptions of the sort used by Malcolm.
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  28. William Lane Craig & J. P. Moreland (eds.) (2009). The Blackwell Companion to Natural Theology. Blackwell Pub.score: 30.0
    Each of the in-depth essays explores at length a particular theistic argument - from Contingency and Consciousness to Reason and Religious Experience - with the ...
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  29. William Lane Craig (2001). Prof. Grünbaum on the ‘Normalcy of Nothingness’ in the Leibnizian and Kalam Cosmological Arguments. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 52 (2):371-386.score: 30.0
  30. Edward Craig (ed.) (2005). The Shorter Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Routledge.score: 30.0
    The Shorter REP presents the very best of the acclaimed ten volume Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy in a single work. By selecting and presenting--in full--the most important entries for the beginning philosopher and truncating the rest of the entries to survey the breadth of the field, The Shorter REP will be the only desk reference on philosophy that anyone will need. Comprising over 900 entries and covering the major philosophers and philosophical topics, The Shorter REP includes the following special features: (...)
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  31. William Lane Craig (1987). Divine Foreknowledge and Newcomb's Paradox. Philosophia 17 (3):331-350.score: 30.0
    Newcomb's Paradox thus serves as an illustrative vindication of the compatibility of divine foreknowledge and human freedom. A proper understanding of the counterfactual conditionals involved enables us to see that the pastness of God's knowledge serves neither to make God's beliefs counterfactually closed nor to rob us of genuine freedom. It is evident that our decisions determine God's past beliefs about those decisions and do so without invoking an objectionable backward causation. It is also clear that in the context of (...)
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  32. Edward Craig (2000). Response to Lehrer. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 60 (3):655-665.score: 30.0
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  33. William Lane Craig (2001). Wishing It Were Now Some Other Time. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 62 (1):159-166.score: 30.0
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  34. Edward Craig (1982). Meaning, Use and Privacy. Mind 91 (364):541-564.score: 30.0
  35. Edward Craig (1997). Meaning and Privacy. In Bob Hale & C. Wright (eds.), A Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell. 541-564.score: 30.0
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  36. William Lane Craig (1999). Oaklander on Mctaggart and Intrinsic Change. Analysis 59 (4):319–320.score: 30.0
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  37. Edward Craig (1976). Sensory Experience and the Foundations of Knowledge. Synthese 33 (June):1-24.score: 30.0
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  38. William L. Craig (1997). Adams on Actualism and Presentism. Philosophia 25 (1-4):401-405.score: 30.0
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  39. William Lane Craig (1990). 'What Place, Then, for a Creator?': Hawking on God and Creation. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 41 (4):473-491.score: 30.0
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  40. William S. Boardman, Austin and the Inferential Account of Perception.score: 30.0
    O SET THE STAGE for the discussion[1], I will rehearse and clarify a well-known dispute between A. J. Ayer and J. L. Austin concerning whether perceptual judgments are inferences. Both in his Sense and Sensibilia[2] and in his "Other Minds,"[3] Austin carefully distinguishes recognizing that p from inferring that p. For the purpose of comparing his position to Ayer's, we might put his basic claim in this way: given the way words such as "recognize" and "infer" are used outside philosophical (...)
     
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  41. William Boardman, Descartes' Meditations.score: 30.0
    ESCARTES was born at the end of the sixteenth century, a time of enormous changes in the western intellectual world, largely brought about by the Reformation. Luther had denied the Church's authority to settle disputes on matters of faith: it was, he had insisted, the Scriptures alone which carry authority; pronouncements of the church, even those with long tradition behind them, were mere opinion, not truth. And so the question was explicitly raised and debated, how does one..
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  42. A. Craig (2004). Human Feelings: Why Are Some More Aware Than Others? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (6):239-241.score: 30.0
  43. William Lane Craig (1997). Is Scepticism About Self-Knowledge Incoherent? Analysis 57 (4):291–295.score: 30.0
  44. William Lane Craig (1997). On the Argument for Divine Timelessness From the Incompleteness of Temporal Life. Heythrop Journal 38 (2):165–171.score: 30.0
  45. W. L. Craig (1999). On Truth Conditions of Tensed Sentence Types. Synthese 120 (2):265-270.score: 30.0
  46. William Craig (2000). The Extent of the Present. International Studies in the Philosophy of Science 14 (2):165 – 185.score: 30.0
    One of the principal objections to a tensed or dynamic theory of time is the ancient puzzle about the extent of the present. Three alternative conceptions of the extent of the present are considered: an instantaneous present, an atomic present, and a non-metrical present. The first conception is difficult to reconcile with the objectivity of temporal becoming posited by a dynamic theory of time. The second conception solves that problem, but only at the expense of making change discontinuous. The third (...)
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  47. Edward Craig (ed.) (1996). Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Routledge.score: 30.0
    The Routledge Encyclopedia of Philosophy-- the unrivalled source of reference for teachers and students of philosophy--is now available online.
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  48. Joel H. Amernic & Russell J. Craig (2010). Accounting as a Facilitator of Extreme Narcissism. Journal of Business Ethics 96 (1):79 - 93.score: 30.0
    We add texture to the conclusion of Duchon and Drake (Journal of Business Ethics, 85, 2009, 301) that extreme narcissism is associated with unethical conduct. We argue that the special features possessed by financial accounting facilitate extreme narcissism in susceptible CEOs. In particular, we propose that extremely narcissistic CEOs are key players in a recurring discourse cycle facilitated by financial accounting language and measures. Such CEOs project themselves as the corporation they lead, construct a narrative about the corporation and themselves (...)
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  49. William S. Boardman (1987). Coordination and the Moral Obligation to Obey the Law. Ethics 97 (3):546-557.score: 30.0
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