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Craig Taylor [24]Craig Elliot Taylor [1]
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Profile: Craig Taylor (Flinders University)
  1.  1
    Craig Taylor (2011). Moralism: A Study of a Vice. Routledge.
    Moralism involves the distortion of moral thought, the distortion of reflection and judgement. It is a vice, and one to which many - from the philosopher to the media pundit to the politician - are highly susceptible. This book examines the nature of moralism in specific moral judgements and the ways in which moral philosophy and theories about morality can themselves become skewed by this vice. This book ranges across a wide range of topics: the problem of the demandingness of (...)
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  2.  34
    Craig Taylor (2001). Moral Incapacity and Huckleberry Finn. Ratio 14 (1):56–67.
    Bernard Williams distinguishes moral incapacities – incapacities that are themselves an expression of the moral life – from mere psychological ones in terms of deliberation. Against Williams I claim there are examples of such moral incapacity where no possible deliberation is involved – that an agent's incapacity may be a primitive feature or fact about their life. However Michael Clark argues that my claim here leaves the distinction between moral and psychological incapacity unexplained, and that an adequate understanding of the (...)
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  3.  36
    Craig Taylor (2009). Art and Moralism. Philosophy 84 (3):341-353.
    Mrs. Digby told me that when she lived in London with her sister, Mrs. Brooke, they were every now and then honoured by the visits of Dr. Johnson. He called on them one day soon after the publication of his immortal dictionary. The two ladies paid him due compliments on the occasion. Amongst other topics of praise they very much commended the omission of all naughty words. 'What! my dears! then you have been looking for them?' said the moralist. The (...)
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  4.  32
    Craig Taylor (2006). Winch on Moral Dilemmas and Moral Modality. Inquiry 49 (2):148 – 157.
    Peter Winch's famous argument in "The Universalizability of Moral Judgments" that moral judgments are not always universalizable is widely thought to involve an essentially sceptical claim about the limitations of moral theories and moral theorising more generally. In this paper I argue that responses to Winch have generally missed the central positive idea upon which Winch's argument is founded: that what is right for a particular agent to do in a given situation may depend on what is and is not (...)
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  5.  11
    Craig Taylor (2014). Literature and Moral Thought. British Journal of Aesthetics 54 (3):285-298.
    I will consider what literature might add to moral thought and understanding as distinct from moral philosophy as it is commonly understood. My argument turns on a distinction between two conceptions of moral thought. One in which the point of moral thought is that it should issue in moral judgement leading to action; the other in which it is concerned also with what Iris Murdoch calls ‘the texture of a man’s being or the nature of his personal vision’. Drawing on (...)
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  6.  20
    Craig Taylor (2005). Moral Cognitivism and Character. Philosophical Investigations 28 (3):253–272.
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  7.  13
    Craig Taylor (2005). Moralism and Morally Accountable Beings. Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (2):153–160.
    abstract In this paper I consider the nature of the purported vice of moralism by examining two examples that, I suggest, exemplify this vice: the first from Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter; the second from David Owen's account of his experience as European negotiator between the warring parties in the former Yugoslavia. I argue that in different ways both these examples show the kind of human weakness or failure that is involved in the most extreme version of moralism, a weakness (...)
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  8.  11
    Craig Taylor (1995). Moral Incapacity. Philosophy 70 (272):273 - 285.
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  9.  14
    Craig Taylor (2012). Huck Finn, Moral Reasons and Sympathy. Philosophy 87 (04):583-593.
    In his influential paper 'The Conscience of Huckleberry Finn', Jonathan Bennett suggests that Huck's failure to turn in the runaway slave Jim as his conscience — a conscience distorted by racism — tells him he ought to is not merely right but also praiseworthy. James Montmarquet however argues against what he sees here as Bennett's 'anti-intellectualism' in moral psychology that insofar as Huck lacks and so fails to act on the moral belief that he should help Jim his action is (...)
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  10.  8
    Craig Taylor (2011). Literature, Moral Reflection and Ambiguity. Philosophy 86 (1):75-93.
    While a number of philosophers have argued recently that it is through our emotional response to certain literary works that we might achieve particular moral understanding, what has not been discussed in detail in this connection are works which generate conflicting responses in the reader; which is to say literary works in which there is significant element of ambiguity. Consider Joseph Conrad's novel Lord Jim. I argue that in making sense of our potentially conflicting responses to this novel, and specifically (...)
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  11.  1
    Craig Taylor (2005). Cary J. Nederman, Ed. And Trans., Political Thought in Early Fourteenth-Century England: Treatises by Walter of Milemete, William of Pagula, and William of Ockham. Tempe, Ariz.: Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, in Collaboration with Brepols, 2002. Pp. Xiii, 209. $30. [REVIEW] Speculum 80 (1):288-289.
  12. Craig Taylor (2006). A Knight's Own Book Of Chivalry. [REVIEW] The Medieval Review 4.
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  13. Craig Taylor (2000). Giles of Rome's De Regimine Principum: Reading and Writing Politics at Court and University, C.1275 - C.1525. [REVIEW] The Medieval Review 9.
     
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  14. Craig Taylor & Stephen Buckle (eds.) (2016). Hume and the Enlightenment. Routledge.
    While Hume remains one of the most central figures in modern philosophy his place within Enlightenment thinking is much less clearly defined. Taking recent work on Hume as a starting point, this volume of original essays aims to re-examine and clarify Hume's influence on the thought and values of the Enlightenment.
     
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  15. Craig Taylor (2015). Hume and the Enlightenment. Routledge.
    While Hume remains one of the most central figures in modern philosophy his place within Enlightenment thinking is much less clearly defined. Taking recent work on Hume as a starting point, this volume of original essays aims to re-examine and clarify Hume's influence on the thought and values of the Enlightenment.
     
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  16. Craig Taylor (2006). Introduction to Special Issue: Global Justice and Global Prosperity. Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 8 (1).
     
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  17. Craig Taylor (2014). Juliet Barker, Conquest: The English Kingdom of France, 1417–1450. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2012. Pp. Xvi, 485. $29.95. ISBN: 978-0-674-06560-4. [REVIEW] Speculum 89 (2):441-442.
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  18. Craig Taylor (2011). Moralism: A Study of a Vice. Routledge.
    Moralism involves the distortion of moral thought, the distortion of reflection and judgement. It is a vice, and one to which many - from the philosopher to the media pundit to the politician - are highly susceptible. This book examines the nature of moralism in specific moral judgements and the ways in which moral philosophy and theories about morality can themselves become skewed by this vice. This book ranges across a wide range of topics: the problem of the demandingness of (...)
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  19. Craig Taylor (2012). Moralism: A Study of a Vice. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    In Moralism: A Study of a Vice, Craig Taylor delves into one of the most overlooked ethical concerns of our time: the vice of moralism, or the distortion of moral thought, reflection, and judgment. This flawed tendency in human nature is pervasive on all levels of society, and affects people from all walks of life - from the philosopher to the pundits and politicians. Covering a wide variety of topics, Moralism takes on such salient issues as the nearly impossible demands (...)
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  20. Craig Taylor (2012). Moralism: A Study of a Vice. Mcgill-Queen's University Press.
    In Moralism: A Study of a Vice, Craig Taylor delves into one of the most overlooked ethical concerns of our time: the vice of moralism, or the distortion of moral thought, reflection, and judgment. This flawed tendency in human nature is pervasive on all levels of society, and affects people from all walks of life - from the philosopher to the pundits and politicians. Covering a wide variety of topics, Moralism takes on such salient issues as the nearly impossible demands (...)
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  21. Craig Taylor (2015). Moralism: A Study of a Vice. Routledge.
    Moralism involves the distortion of moral thought, the distortion of reflection and judgement. It is a vice, and one to which many - from the philosopher to the media pundit to the politician - are highly susceptible. This book examines the nature of moralism in specific moral judgements and the ways in which moral philosophy and theories about morality can themselves become skewed by this vice. This book ranges across a wide range of topics: the problem of the demandingness of (...)
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  22. Craig Taylor (2004). Morality and the Role-Differentiated Behaviour of Lawyers. Australian Journal of Professional and Applied Ethics 6 (1).
     
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  23. Craig Taylor (2012). Review Jones, Bloodied Banners: Martial Display on the Medieval Battlefield. (Warfare in History.) Woodbridge, Suffolk, UK: Boydell Press, 2010. Pp. X, 218; Color and B&W Figs. $90. ISBN: 9781843835615. [REVIEW] Speculum 87 (3):884-885.
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  24. Craig Taylor (2002). Sympathy: A Philosophical Analysis. Palgrave Macmillan.
    It is widely held in contemporary moral philosophy that moral agency must be explained in terms of some more basic account of human nature. This book presents a fundamental challenge to this view. Specifically, it argues that sympathy, understood as an immediate and unthinking response to another's suffering, plays a constitutive role in our conception of what it is to be human, and specifically in that conception of human life on which anything we might call a moral life depends.
     
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