Search results for 'Creationism Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael Ruse (1990). Making Use of Creationism. A Case-Study for the Philosophy of Science Classroom. Studies in Philosophy and Education 10 (1):81-92.score: 126.0
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  2. Elliott Sober (2000). Philosophy of Biology. Westview Press.score: 90.0
    Perhaps because of it implications for our understanding of human nature, recent philosophy of biology has seen what might be the most dramatic work in the philosophies of the ”special” sciences. This drama has centered on evolutionary theory, and in the second edition of this textbook, Elliott Sober introduces the reader to the most important issues of these developments. With a rare combination of technical sophistication and clarity of expression, Sober engages both the higher level of theory and the (...)
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  3. Edward L. Schoen (2008). Sahotra Sarkar, Doubting Darwin: Creationist Designs on Evolution (Blackwell Public Philosophy Series). [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 64 (3):167-171.score: 78.0
  4. Leroy S. Rouner (1974). Creationism and Emanationism: A Problem in Radhakrishnan's Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 24 (2):227-238.score: 78.0
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  5. Grzegorz Bugajak & Jacek Tomczyk (2009). Human Origins: Continuous Evolution Versus Punctual Creation. In Pranab Das (ed.), Global Perspectives on Science and Spirituality. Templeton Press. 143–164.score: 72.0
    One of the particular problems in the debate between science and theology regarding human origins seems to be an apparent controversy between the continuous character of evolutionary processes leading to the origin of Homo sapiens and the punctual understanding of the act of creation of man seen as taking place in a moment in time. The paper elaborates scientific arguments for continuity or discontinuity of evolution, and what follows, for the existence or nonexistence of a clear borderline between our species (...)
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  6. Gordon Campbell (2009). Philosophy (D.N.) Sedley Creationism and its Critics in Antiquity. (Sather Classical Lectures 66). Berkeley and London: University of California Press, 2007. Pp. Xvii + 269. $29.95/£17.95. 9780520253643. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 129:227-.score: 72.0
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  7. Roy R. Bode (1955). Creationism in Physics and Philosophy. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 29:135-139.score: 72.0
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  8. Massimo Pigliucci (2005). More Than You Ever Wanted to Know About Intelligent Design. [REVIEW] Evolution 59 (12):2717-2720.score: 60.0
    The so-called evolution wars (Futuyma 1995; Pigliucci 2002) between the scientific understanding of the history of life on earth and various religiously inspired forms of cre- ationism are more than ever at the forefront of the broader ‘‘science wars,’’ themselves a part of the even more encom- passing ‘‘cultural wars.’’ With all these conflicts going on, and at a time when a potentially historical case on the teach- ing of Intelligent Design (ID) in public schools is being de- bated in (...)
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  9. Robert T. Pennock (1996). Naturalism, Evidence and Creationism: The Case of Phillip Johnson. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 11 (4):543-559.score: 60.0
    Phillip Johnson claims that Creationism is a better explanation of the existence and characteristics of biological species than is evolutionary theory. He argues that the only reason biologists do not recognize that Creationist's negative arguments against Darwinism have proven this is that they are wedded to a biased ideological philosophy —Naturalism — which dogmatically denies the possibility of an intervening creative god. However,Johnson fails to distinguish Ontological Naturalism from Methodological Naturalism. Science makes use of the latter and I (...)
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  10. Massimo Pigliucci (2007). Evolution, Schmevolution: Jon Stewart and the Culture Wars. In J. Holt (ed.), The Daily Show and Philosophy. Wiley.score: 60.0
    Jon Stewart, the famous comic of the Daily Show, takes on creationism, intelligent design and evolution.
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  11. Robert T. Pennock & Michael Ruse (eds.) (2009). But is It Science?: The Philosophical Question in the Creation/Evolution Controversy. Prometheus Books.score: 60.0
     
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  12. Michael Ruse (ed.) (1988). But is It Science?: The Philosophical Question in the Creation/Evolution Controversy. Prometheus Books.score: 60.0
     
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  13. Christine James (2008). Evolution and Conservative Christianity: How Philosophy of Science Pedagogy Can Begin the Conversation. Spontaneous Generations 2 (1):185-212.score: 54.0
    I teach Philosophy of Science at a four-year state university located in the southeastern United States with a strong college of education. This means that the Philosophy of Science class I teach attracts large numbers of students who will later become science teachers in Georgia junior high and high schools—the same schools that recently began including evolution "warning" stickers in science textbooks. I am also a faculty member in a department combining Religious Studies and Philosophy. This means (...)
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  14. Christopher Winch (2008). Philosophy of Education: The Key Concepts. Routledge.score: 54.0
    This new edition of Philosophy of Education: The Key Concepts is an easy to use A-Z guide summarizing all the key terms, ideas and issues central to the study of educational theory today. Fully updated, the book is cross-referenced throughout and contains pointers to further reading, as well as new entries on such topics as: Citizenship and Civic Education Liberalism Capability Well-being Patriotism Globalisation Open-mindedness Creationism and Intelligent Design. Comprehensive and authoritative this highly accessible guide provides all that (...)
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  15. Christopher Norris & Marianna Papastephanou (2002). Deconstruction, Anti–Realism and Philosophy of Science—an Interview with Christopher Norris. Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (2):265–289.score: 48.0
    In this interview, Christopher Norris discusses a wide range of issues having to do with postmodernism, deconstruction and other controversial topics of debate within present-day philosophy and critical theory. More specifically he challenges the view of deconstruction as just another offshoot of the broader postmodernist trend in cultural studies and the social sciences. Norris puts the case for deconstruction as continuing the 'unfinished project of modernity' and—in particular—for Derrida's work as sustaining the values of enlightened critical reason in various (...)
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  16. J. Dupre (1996). Review of Sober's "Philosophy of Biology". [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 63:143-145.score: 48.0
    Elliott Sober is among the leading contemporary contributors to the philosophy of biology. He also has an exceptional ability to explain difficult ideas clearly. He is therefore very well equipped to provide an accessible yet state-of-the-art introduction to the philosophy of biology, and in most respects this optimistic prognosis is justified by the present volume. Focussing on evolutionary biology, Sober provides a general overview of evolutionary theory; a chapter on creationism that serves as a vehicle for the (...)
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  17. Igor I. Kondrashin (2008). The Motion in Quality as The Scientific Alternative to Ideas of Creationism. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 17:97-106.score: 48.0
    Rethinking “philosophy” to-day, it is necessary to think first of all about ontological foundations of the modern scientific universe description and rethink them on the ground of modern scientific knowledge, because until now there is no any precise scientific conception of the structure of the universe, of reasons and movingforces of its permanent evolution. All of it create basis to propose various unscientific ideas of creationism. Until now most of philosophers associate the motion of Matter on the whole (...)
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  18. David B. Wilson & Warren D. Dolphin (eds.) (1996). Did the Devil Make Darwin Do It?: Modern Perspectives on the Creation-Evolution Controversy. Iowa State University Press.score: 48.0
     
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  19. John S. Wilkins (2001). Tower of Babel: The Evidence Against the New Creationism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 79 (2):302 – 304.score: 42.0
    Book Information Tower of Babel: the evidence against the new creationism. By Robert T. Pennock. Bradford/MIT Press. Cambridge MA. 1999. Pp. xviii + 429.
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  20. Paul Thagard, Evolution, Creation, and the Philosophy of Science.score: 42.0
    Debates about evolution and creation inevitably raise philosophical issues about the nature of scientific knowledge. What is a theory? What is an explanation? How is science different from non- science? How should theories be evaluated? Does science achieve truth? The aim of this chapter is to give a concise and accessible introduction to the philosophy of science, focusing on questions relevant to understanding evolution by natural selection, creation, and intelligent design. For the questions just listed, I state what I (...)
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  21. David L. Hull (2001). Michael Ruse and His Fifteen Years of Booknotes – for Better or for Worse. Biology and Philosophy 16 (3):423-435.score: 42.0
    In this paper I trace Michael Ruse's Booknotes from the first volumeof Biology and Philosophy in 1986 to the present. I deal withboth the style and the content of these booknotes. Ruse paid specialattention to authors outside of the traditional English axis as wellas to feminist writers. He complained that too much attention wasbeing paid to certain topics (e.g., evolutionary ethics, evolutionaryepistemology, the species problem and reduction) while other, moreimportant topics were all but ignored (e.g., natural selection,population genetics, levels (...)
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  22. Kelly C. Smith (2011). Foiling the Black Knight. Synthese 178 (2):219 - 235.score: 36.0
    Why is the academy in general, and philosophy in particular, not more involved in the fight against the creationist threat? And why, when a response is offered, is it so curiously ineffective? I argue, by using an analogy with the battle against the Black Knight from the movie Monty Python and the Holy Grail, that the difficulty lies largely in a failure to see the nature of the problem clearly. By modifying the analogy, it is possible to see both (...)
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  23. Philip Kitcher (2003). In Mendel's Mirror: Philosophical Reflections on Biology. Oxford University Press.score: 36.0
    Philip Kitcher is one of the leading figures in the philosophy of science today. Here he collects, for the first time, many of his published articles on the philosophy of biology, spanning from the mid-1980's to the present. The book's title refers to Gregor Mendel, an Augustinian monk who was one of the first scientists to develop a theory of heredity. Mendel's work has been deeply influential to our understanding of our selves and our world, just as the (...)
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  24. Leslie Marsh (2006). Review of Dennett's Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon. [REVIEW] Journal of Mind and Behavior 27 (3-4):357-366.score: 32.0
    The thesis that Dennett argues for in Breaking the Spell: Religion as a Natural Phenomenon has a double aspect. First, religion being but one natural phenomenon among many should be subject to scientific investigation. Resistance to this notion constitutes the first spell or taboo and is in complicity with the second “master” spell, that of the phenomenon of religion itself. Dennett’s tentative naturalistic recommendation is two-pronged: he primarily deploys an evolutionary biology perspective, and derivatively a highly suggestive appeal to memetics. (...)
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  25. Michael J. Reiss (2011). How Should Creationism and Intelligent Design Be Dealt with in the Classroom? Journal of Philosophy of Education 45 (3):399-415.score: 30.0
    Until recently, little attention has been paid in the school classroom to creationism and almost none to intelligent design. However, creationism and possibly intelligent design appear to be on the increase and there are indications that there are more countries in which schools are becoming battle-grounds over them. I begin by examining whether creationism and intelligent design are controversial issues, drawing on Robert Dearden's epistemic criterion of the controversial and more recent responses to and defences of this. (...)
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  26. Adolf Grünbaum (2004). The Poverty of Theistic Cosmology. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (4):561 - 614.score: 30.0
    Philosophers have postulated the existence of God to explain (I) why any contingent objects exist at all rather than nothing contingent, and (II) why the fundamental laws of nature and basic facts of the world are exactly what they are. Therefore, we ask: (a) Does (I) pose a well-conceived question which calls for an answer? and (b) Can God's presumed will (or intention) provide a cogent explanation of the basic laws and facts of the world, as claimed by (II)? We (...)
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  27. D. N. Sedley (2008). Creationism and its Critics in Antiquity. University of California Press.score: 30.0
    In this book, David Sedley examines this question and illuminates new historical perspectives on the pantheon of thinkers who laid the foundations of Western ...
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  28. Bokyoung Son & Yeonoh Son (2008). The Principle of Human Essence. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 17:423-429.score: 30.0
    Even though many people have been looking for the origin of human beings, we still don’t know how human beings came into existence. So far, there are two major theories to explain human beings’ starting point – creationism and the theory of evolution. These theories are so abstract that it is hard to accept either one.This essay presents a new theory which explains how human beings and all beings come into existence and carries implications bearing on human conduct. The (...)
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  29. George Nakhnikian (2004). It Ain't Necessarily So: An Essay Review of Intelligent Design Creationism and its Critics: Philosophical, Theological, and Scientific Perspectives. Philosophy of Science 71 (4):593-604.score: 26.0
    Nature exhibits a rich variety of adaptations. Cells contain complex biomolecular structures, such as proteins, that are exquisitely adapted to perform specific biological functions. Evolutionary biology explains how biomolecular structures evolve. Intelligent design creationists reject evolutionary explanations. They want to believe that all adaptations in nature are the handiwork of God. Their critics aver that “it ain't necessarily so.” The anthology under review is an excellent display of the issues between intelligent design creationists and their critics. I agree with the (...)
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  30. Jeffrey Koperski (2003). Intelligent Design and the End of Science. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 77 (4):567-588.score: 24.0
    In his recent anthology, Intelligent Design Creationism and Its Critics, Robert Pennock continues his attack on what he considers to be the pseudoscience of Intelligent Design Theory. In this critical review, I discuss the main issues in the debate. Although the rhetoric is often heavy and the articles are intentionally stacked against Intelligent Design, there are many interesting topics in the philosophy of science to be found. I conclude that, contra Pennock, there is nothing intrinsically unscientific about Intelligent (...)
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  31. Philippe Gagnon (2007). Contenu, Enjeux Et Diversité des Acceptions de L’Intelligent Design En Contexte Étatsunien. Connaître. Cahiers de l'Association Foi Et Culture Scientifique 26:9-43.score: 24.0
    This paper aims at introducing a French audience to the Intelligent Design debate. It starts by reviewing recent attacks on any possibility of a rational account of theism in light of the contemporary theory of evolution. A section is devoted to outlining the genesis of the "wedge" strategy, to distinguish it from young earth creationism, and to highlight the questioning of evolution as our meta-narrative bearing on overall conceptions of the scientific endeavor. The arguments propounded by Behe are reviewed (...)
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  32. Lenn Evan Goodman (2006). Avicenna. Cornell University.score: 24.0
    the philosophers in the West, none, perhaps, is better known by name and less familiar in actual content of his ideas than the medieval Muslim philosopher, physician, minister and naturalist Abu Ali Ibn Sina, known since the days of the scholastics as Avicenna. In this book the author, himself a philosopher, and long known for his studies of Arabic thought, presents a factual account of Avicenna's philosophy. Setting the thinker in the context of his often turbulent times and tracing (...)
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  33. Norman Kretzmann (1997). Creation Without Creationism. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 21 (1):118-144.score: 24.0
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  34. Jacek Tomczyk & Grzegorz Bugajak (2009). On Evolution and Creation: Problem Solved? The Polish Example. Zygon 44 (4):859-878.score: 24.0
    We present the results of research carried out as a part of the project “Current Controversies about Human Origins: Between Anthropology and the Bible”, which focused on the supposed conflict between natural sciences and some branches of the humanities, notably philosophy and theology, with regard to human origins. One way to tackle the issue was to distribute a questionnaire among students and teachers of the relevant disciplines. Teachers of religion and the natural sciences (biology, chemistry, and physics) and students (...)
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  35. Michael Ruse (2009). Creationism and its Critics in Antiquity (Review). Journal of the History of Philosophy 47 (3):pp. 464-466.score: 24.0
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  36. Robert Howell (2011). The Skeptic, the Content Externalist, and the Theist. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (3):173-180.score: 24.0
    Some philosophers argue that content externalism can provide the foundations of an argument against the traditional epistemological skeptic. I maintain that if such an argument is available, it seems there is also an a priori argument against the possibility of a creationist god. My suspicion is that such a strong consequence is not desirable for the content-externalists, and that the availability of this argument therefore casts doubt on the anti-skeptical position. I argue that all content externalists should be troubled by (...)
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  37. Marian Hillar (2000). Creationism and Evolution Misconceptions About Science and Religion and the Socinian Solution. Essays in the Philosophy of Humanism 8:1-27.score: 24.0
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  38. Sami Pihlström (2010). Pragmatic Aspects of Kantian Theism. The Pluralist 5 (1):279-287.score: 24.0
    Is there a god? What do we, and what should we, mean by this question? How, if at all, might the question, given that its meaning(s) can be clarified, be settled or even rationally discussed? Is there any chance for a reasonable, scientifically minded person to believe in the reality of God, or is atheism the only intellectually responsible option for us today? Is theism inevitably committed to the pseudoscientific absurdities of creationism, the "intelligent design theory," and other unfortunately (...)
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  39. Michael Ruse (1984). Book Review:Abusing Science: The Case Against Creationism Philip Kitcher. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 51 (2):348-.score: 24.0
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  40. Doren Recker (2007). Scientific Creationism, Intelligent Design, and the Demarcation Problem. Southwest Philosophy Review 23 (1):27-38.score: 24.0
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  41. Daniel W. Graham (2009). Creationism and its Critics in Antiquity. Ancient Philosophy 29 (2):423-427.score: 24.0
  42. Francisco J. Ayala (2006). Evolution Vs. Creationism. [REVIEW] History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 28 (1):71 - 82.score: 24.0
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  43. John Robert Baker (1992). The Epistemological Veil of Scientific Creationism. Southwest Philosophy Review 8 (1):173-181.score: 24.0
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  44. Frederick J. Crosson (1984). Is God a Creationist? Faith and Philosophy 1 (3):343-345.score: 24.0
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  45. Ronald L. Numbers (2010). Clarifying Creationism: Five Common Myths. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 33 (1):129-139.score: 24.0
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  46. D. R. Griffin (2007). Creationism, God, and Global Ethic. Philosophy and Culture 397:27-40.score: 24.0
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  47. William A. Rottschaefer (1986). Willard A. Young, Fallacies of Creationism Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 6 (8):411-412.score: 24.0
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  48. Michael Ruse (2008). Charles Darwin. Blackwell Pub..score: 24.0
    The definitive work on the philosophical nature and impact of the theories of Charles Darwin, written by a well-known authority on the history and philosophy of Darwinism. Broadly explores the theories of Charles Darwin and Darwin studies Incorporates much information about modern Biology Offers a comprehensive discussion of Darwinism and Christianity – including Creationism – by one of the leading authorities in the field Written in clear, concise, user-friendly language supplemented with quality illustrations Examines the status of evolutionary (...)
     
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  49. Niall Shanks (2003). Robert T. Pennock, Ed., Intelligent Design Creationism and its Critics: Philosophical, Theological and Scientific Perspectives Reviewed By. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 23 (4):270-272.score: 24.0
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  50. Eric Dietrich (2011). There Is No Progress in Philosophy. Essays in Philosophy 12 (2):9.score: 21.0
    Except for a patina of twenty-first century modernity, in the form of logic and language, philosophy is exactly the same now as it ever was; it has made no progress whatsoever. We philosophers wrestle with the exact same problems the Pre-Socratics wrestled with. Even more outrageous than this claim, though, is the blatant denial of its obvious truth by many practicing philosophers. The No-Progress view is explored and argued for here. Its denial is diagnosed as a form of anosognosia, (...)
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