Search results for 'Creative ability in science' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. National Committee for Research Ethics in Science & Technology (2009). Guidelines for Research Ethics in Science and Technology. Jahrbuch für Wissenschaft Und Ethik 14 (1).score: 1590.0
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  2. Denis Dutton & Michael Krausz (eds.) (1981). The Concept of Creativity in Science and Art. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Boston.score: 778.0
  3. Arthur I. Miller (1996/2000). Insights of Genius: Imagery and Creativity in Science and Art. Mit Press.score: 778.0
  4. Tord H. Ganelius (ed.) (1986). Progress in Science and its Social Conditions: Nobel Symposium 58, Held at Lidingö, Sweden, 15-19 August 1983. Published for the Nobel Foundation by Pergamon Press.score: 678.0
  5. Gregor Wolbring & Natalie Ball (2012). Nanoscale Science and Technology and People with Disabilities in Asia: An Ability Expectation Analysis. [REVIEW] Nanoethics 6 (2):127-135.score: 558.0
    Science and technology, including nanoscale science and technology, influences and is influenced by various discourses and areas of action. Ableism is one concept and ability expectation is one dynamic that impacts the direction, vision, and application of nanoscale science and technology and vice versa. At the same time, policy documents that involve or relate to disabled people exhibit ability expectations of disabled people. The authors present ability expectations exhibited within two science and technology (...)
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  6. L. Briskman (1981). Creative Product and Creative Process in Science and Art. In Denis Dutton & Michael Krausz (eds.), The Concept of Creativity in Science and Art. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Boston. 83 – 106.score: 531.8
    The main aim of this essay is to propose and develop a product?oriented, non?psychologistic, approach to scientific and artistic creativity. I first argue that the central problem is that of answering the question: how is creativity possible? Traditional approaches to this question tend to locate creativity primarily in some special psychological processes or traits, or in some special creative act. Some general arguments against such an approach are developed, and it is suggested that creativity ought primarily to be located (...)
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  7. Pradip Kumar Sengupta (1995). Science, Language, and Creativity. Progressive Publishers.score: 528.0
  8. B. van Norren (1976). Original and Derived Creativity in Scientific Thinking. Afdelingen Voor Sociale Wetenschappen Aan De Landbouwhogeschool.score: 528.0
  9. John Beloff (1970). Creative Thinking in Art and in Science. British Journal of Aesthetics 10 (1):58-70.score: 513.0
    Two questions are examined (a) the differences between creative and uncreative individuals and (b) the differences between artists and scientists. It is concluded that while divergent thinking is a necessary feature of the creative process alike in art and in science the scientific intellect exemplifies more the convergent type. Contrary to what most authorities have said it is here argued that creativity depends more upon the presence of a certain inborn flair than upon personality dynamics.
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  10. Larry Briskman (1980). Creative Product and Creative Process in Science and Art. Inquiry 23 (1):83 – 106.score: 476.3
    The main aim of this essay is to propose and develop a product?oriented, non?psychologistic, approach to scientific and artistic creativity. I first argue that the central problem is that of answering the question: how is creativity possible? Traditional approaches to this question tend to locate creativity primarily in some special psychological processes or traits, or in some special creative act. Some general arguments against such an approach are developed, and it is suggested that creativity ought primarily to be located (...)
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  11. Carl A. Rubino (2000). The Politics of Certainty: Conceptions of Science in an Age of Uncertainty. Science and Engineering Ethics 6 (4):499-508.score: 468.0
    The prestige of science, derived from its claims to certainty, has adversely affected the humanities. There is, in fact, a “politics of certainty”. Our ability to predict events in a limited sphere has been idealized, engendering dangerous illusions about our power to control nature and eliminate time. In addition, the perception and propagation of science as a bearer of certainty has served to legitimate harmful forms of social, sexual, and political power. Yet, as Ilya Prigogine has argued, (...)
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  12. Vuk Uskoković (2010). Major Challenges for the Modern Chemistry in Particular and Science in General. Foundations of Science 15 (4):303-344.score: 468.0
    In the past few hundred years, science has exerted an enormous influence on the way the world appears to human observers. Despite phenomenal accomplishments of science, science nowadays faces numerous challenges that threaten its continued success. As scientific inventions become embedded within human societies, the challenges are further multiplied. In this critical review, some of the critical challenges for the field of modern chemistry are discussed, including: (a) interlinking theoretical knowledge and experimental approaches; (b) implementing the principles (...)
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  13. Helmut Veil (2010). Geistesblitz Und Kühne Vermutung: Eine Historische Studie Zur Spekulation in den Naturwissenschaften: Ptolemäus, Cusanus, Fracastorius, Stahl, Yukawa. Humanities Online.score: 468.0
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  14. David Bohm (1996/2004). On Creativity. Routledge.score: 452.0
    Creativity is fundamental to human experience. In On Creativity David Bohm, the world-renowned scientist, investigates the phenomenon from all sides. This is a remarkable and life-affirming book by one of the most far-sighted thinkers of modern.
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  15. Albert Rothenberg (1987). Einstein, Bohr, and Creative Thinking in Science. History of Science 25 (68):147-166.score: 447.8
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  16. Austin L. Porterfield (1941). Creative Factors in Scientific Research; a Social Psychology of Scientific Knowledge, Studying the Interplay of Psychological and Cultural Factors in Science with Emphasis Upon Imagination. Durham, N.C.,Duke University Press.score: 445.5
     
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  17. Max Schoen (1942). Creative Experience in Science and Art. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 1 (4):22-32.score: 438.8
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  18. L. Magnani (ed.) (2006). Abduction, Practical Reasoning, and Creative Inferences in Science. Oxford University Press.score: 438.8
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  19. Wolfgang Achtner (2005). Infinity in Science and Religion. The Creative Role of Thinking About Infinity. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 47 (4):392-411.score: 436.5
    This article discusses the history of the concepts of potential infinity and actual infinity in the context of Christian theology, mathematical thinking and metaphysical reasoning. It shows that the structure of Ancient Greek rationality could not go beyond the concept of potential infinity, which is highlighted in Aristotle's metaphysics. The limitations of the metaphysical mind of ancient Greece were overcome through Christian theology and its concept of the infinite God, as formulated in Gregory of Nyssa's theology. That is how the (...)
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  20. Johan De Smedt, Common Minds, Uncommon Thoughts: A Philosophical Anthropological Investigation of Uniquely Human Creative Behavior, with an Emphasis on Artistic Ability, Religious Reflection, and Scientific Study.score: 432.0
    The aim of this dissertation is to create a naturalistic philosophical picture of creative capacities that are specific to our species, focusing on artistic ability, religious reflection, and scientific study. By integrating data from diverse domains (evolutionary and developmental psychology, cognitive anthropology and archeology, neuroscience) within a philosophical anthropological framework, I have presented a cognitive and evolutionary approach to the question of why humans, but not other animals engage in such activities. Through an application of cognitive and evolutionary (...)
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  21. Pd Wolfgang Achtner (2005). Infinity in Science and Religion. The Creative Role of Thinking About Infinity. Neue Zeitschrift für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 47 (4).score: 427.5
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  22. K. Popper (1989). Creative Self-Criticism in Science and in Art. Diogenes 37 (145):36-45.score: 427.5
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  23. David Bohm (2003). The Essential David Bohm. Routledge.score: 420.0
    There are few scientists of the twentieth century whose life's work has created more excitement and controversy than that of physicist David Bohm (1917-1992). Exploring the philosophical implication of both physics and consciousness, Bohm's penchant for questioning scientific and social orthodoxy was the expression of a rare and maverick intelligence. For Bohm, the world of matter and the experience of consciousness were two aspects of a more fundamental process he called the implicate order. Without a working sensibility of what this (...)
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  24. Valerie E. Lee & David T. Burkam (1996). Gender Differences in Middle Grade Science Achievement: Subject Domain, Ability Level, and Course Emphasis. Science Education 80 (6):613-650.score: 414.0
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  25. Elena Bougleux & Raffaella Trigona (eds.) (2009). Percorsi Creativi E Compresenze Immaginarie: Riflessioni Epistemologiche Ed Antropologiche Sulla Multidisciplinarietà. Guaraldi.score: 408.0
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  26. Gyō Takeda (2004). Nō Wa Butsurigaku o Ikani Tsukuru No Ka. Iwanami Shoten.score: 408.0
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  27. Gibson Winter (1973). Human Science and Ethics in a Creative Society. Philosophy and Social Criticism 1 (1):145-176.score: 405.0
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  28. Karl-Heinz Pohl, Anselm W. Müller Leiden, Numbers From Han, Kwok Siu Tong, Chan Sin, Joshua W. C. Cutler & Imagining Karma (2003). Advaita Vedanta. Edited by R. Balasubramanian. Volume II, Part 2 of History of Science, Philosophy and Culture in Indian Civilization, Edited by DP Chatto-Padhyaya. New Delhi: Centre for Studies in Civilizations, 2000. Pp. Xxiii+ 417. Price Not Given. Aesthetics & Chaos: Investigating a Creative Complicity. Edited by Grazia March. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 53 (4):618-619.score: 405.0
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  29. Mike W. Martin (2006). Moral Creativity in Science and Engineering. Science and Engineering Ethics 12 (3):421-433.score: 378.0
    Creativity in science and engineering has moral significance and deserves attention within professional ethics, in at least three areas. First, much scientific and technological creativity constitutes moral creativity because it generates moral benefits, is motivated by moral concern, and manifests virtues such as beneficence, courage, and perseverance. Second, creativity contributes to the meaning that scientists and engineers derive from their work, thereby connecting with virtues such as authenticity and also faults arising from Faustian trade-offs. Third, morally creative leadership (...)
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  30. Daniel Saunders & Paul Thagard, Creativity in Computer Science.score: 336.0
    Computer science only became established as a field in the 1950s, growing out of theoretical and practical research begun in the previous two decades. The field has exhibited immense creativity, ranging from innovative hardware such as the early mainframes to software breakthroughs such as programming languages and the Internet. Martin Gardner worried that "it would be a sad day if human beings, adjusting to the Computer Revolution, became so intellectually lazy that they lost their power of creative thinking" (...)
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  31. Henry Corbin (1998). Alone with the Alone: Creative Imagination in the Ṣūfism of Ibn ʻarabī. Princeton University Press.score: 319.5
    "Henry Corbin's works are the best guide to the visionary tradition.... Corbin, like Scholem and Jonas, is remembered as a scholar of genius. He was uniquely equipped not only to recover Iranian Sufism for the West, but also to defend the principal Western traditions of esoteric spirituality."--From the introduction by Harold Bloom Ibn 'Arabi (1165-1240) was one of the great mystics of all time. Through the richness of his personal experience and the constructive power of his intellect, he made a (...)
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  32. Sharyn Clough (forthcoming). Pragmatism and Embodiment as Resources for Feminist Interventions in Science. Contemporary Pragmatism Vol. 10 (2).score: 306.0
    Feminist theorists have shown that knowledge is embodied in ways that make a difference in science. Intemann properly endorses feminist standpoint theory over Longino’s empiricism, insofar as the former better addresses embodiment. I argue that a pragmatist analysis further improves standpoint theory: Pragmatism avoids the radical subjectivity that otherwise leaves us unable to account for our ability to share scientific knowledge across bodies of different kinds; and it allows us to argue for the inclusion, not just of the (...)
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  33. Kristian Camilleri (2014). Toward a Constructivist Epistemology of Thought Experiments in Science. Synthese 191 (8):1697-1716.score: 306.0
    This paper presents a critical analysis of Tamar Szabó Gendler’s view of thought experiments, with the aim of developing further a constructivist epistemology of thought experiments in science. While the execution of a thought experiment cannot be reduced to standard forms of inductive and deductive inference, in the process of working though a thought experiment, a logical argument does emerge and take shape. Taking Gendler’s work as a point of departure, I argue that performing a thought experiment involves a (...)
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  34. N. Tosh (2003). Anachronism and Retrospective Explanation: In Defence of a Present-Centred History of Science. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 34 (3):647-659.score: 297.0
    This paper defends the right of historians to make use of their knowledge of the remote consequences of past actions. In particular, it is argued that the disciplinary cohesion of the history of science relies crucially upon our ability to target, for further investigation, those past activities ancestral to modern science. The history of science is not limited to the study of those activities but it is structured around them. In this sense, the discipline is inherently (...)
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  35. Dudley Shapere (1982). The Concept of Observation in Science and Philosophy. Philosophy of Science 49 (4):485-525.score: 292.5
    Through a study of a sophisticated contemporary scientific experiment, it is shown how and why use of the term 'observation' in reference to that experiment departs from ordinary and philosophical usages which associate observation epistemically with perception. The role of "background information" is examined, and general conclusions are arrived at regarding the use of descriptive language in and in talking about science. These conclusions bring out the reasoning by which science builds on what it has learned, and, further, (...)
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  36. Henriikka Clarkeburn (2002). A Test for Ethical Sensitivity in Science. Journal of Moral Education 31 (4):439-453.score: 288.0
    The Test for Ethical Sensitivity in Science (TESS) described in this article is a pen-and-paper measure for studying ethical sensitivity development in young adults. It was developed to evaluate the impact of a short ethics discussion course for university science students. TESS requires students to respond to an unstructured story and their responses are scored according to the level of recognition of the ethical issues in the scenario provided. When TESS was used in conjunction with ethics teaching it (...)
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  37. Lorenzo Magnani, Walter Carnielli & Claudio Pizzi (eds.) (2010). MODEL-BASED REASONING IN SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY. Springer.score: 288.0
    This volume is based on the papers presented at the international conference Model-Based Reasoning in Science and Technology (MBR09_BRAZIL), held at the University of Campinas (UNICAMP), Campinas, Brazil, December 2009. The presentations given at the conference explored how scientific cognition, but several other kinds as well, use models, abduction, and explanatory reasoning to produce important or creative changes in theories and concepts. Some speakers addressed the problem of model-based reasoning in technology, and stressed the issue of science (...)
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  38. Karl R. Popper (1994). The Myth of the Framework: In Defence of Science and Rationality. Routledge.score: 288.0
    In a career spanning sixty years, Sir Karl Popper has made some of the most important contributions to the twentieth century discussion of science and rationality. The Myth of the Framework is a new collection of some of Popper's most important material on this subject. Sir Karl discusses such issues as the aims of science, the role that it plays in our civilization, the moral responsibility of the scientist, the structure of history, and the perennial choice between reason (...)
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  39. Robert S. Root-Bernstein (1996). The Sciences and Arts Share a Common Creative Aesthetic. In. In Alfred I. Tauber (ed.), The Elusive Synthesis: Aesthetics and Science. Kluwer. 49--82.score: 286.5
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  40. Kevin Dunbar (1997). How Scientists Think: On-Line Creativity and Conceptual Change in Science. In T. B. Ward, S. M. Smith & J. Viad (eds.), Creative Thought: An Investigation of Conceptual Structures and Processes. American Psychological Association. 461--493.score: 286.5
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  41. K. Brad Wray (2005). Creativity in Science: Chance, Logic, Genius.. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 72 (4):656-658.score: 286.0
    This is a book review of Dean Simonton's Creativity in Science.
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  42. Robert C. Miner (2004). Truth in the Making: Creative Knowledge in Theology and Philosophy. Routledge.score: 283.5
    Truth in the Making represents a sophisticated effort to map the complex relations between human knowledge and creative power, as reflected across more than half a millennium of philosophical enquiry. Showing the intimacy of this problematic to the work of Nicholas of Cusa, Bacon, Galileo, Descartes, Hobbes, Leibniz, Vico and David Lachterman, the book reveals how questions about creation apparently diluted by secularism in fact retain much of their potency today. If science could counterfeit or synthesize nature precisely (...)
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  43. Henry Corbin (1970). Creative Imagination in the Sūfism of Ibn ʻarabi. London, Routledge & K. Paul.score: 283.5
  44. Henry Corbin (1969). Creative Imagination in the Ṣūfism of Ibn ʻarabī. [Princeton, N.J.]Princeton University Press.score: 283.5
    A penetrating analysis of the life and doctrines of the Spanish-born Arab theologian.
     
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  45. Anwar Tlili & Emily Dawson (2010). Mediating Science and Society in the EU and UK: From Information-Transmission to Deliberative Democracy? Minerva 48 (4):429-461.score: 279.0
    In this paper we critically review recent developments in policies, practices and philosophies pertaining to the mediation between science and the public within the EU and the UK, focusing in particular on the current paradigm of Public Understanding of Science and Technology (PEST) which seeks to depart from the science information-transmission associated with previous paradigms, and enact a deliberative democracy model. We first outline the features of the current crisis in democracy and discuss deliberative democracy as a (...)
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  46. Timothy Colburn & Gary Shute (2010). Abstraction, Law, and Freedom in Computer Science. Metaphilosophy 41 (3):345-364.score: 279.0
    Abstract: Laws of computer science are prescriptive in nature but can have descriptive analogs in the physical sciences. Here, we describe a law of conservation of information in network programming, and various laws of computational motion (invariants) for programming in general, along with their pedagogical utility. Invariants specify constraints on objects in abstract computational worlds, so we describe language and data abstraction employed by software developers and compare them to Floridi's concept of levels of abstraction. We also consider Floridi's (...)
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  47. A. Scholl (2010). Radical Constructivism in Communication Science. Constructivist Foundations 6 (1):51-57.score: 279.0
    Purpose: Describing how radical constructivism was introduced to communication science and analyzing why it has not yet become a mainstream endeavour. Situation: Before radical constructivism entered the relevant debates in communication sciences, moderate constructivist positions had already been developed. Problem: Radical constructivists’ argumentation has often been provocative and exaggerating in style, and extreme in its position. This has provoked harsh reactions within the mainstream scientific community. Several argumentative strategies have been used to degrade radical constructivist arguments and their relevance. (...)
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  48. John Douglas Bishop (2012). The Elephant in the Room: On the Absence of Corporations in Bernard Hodgson's Economics as a Moral Science. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 108 (1):27-35.score: 279.0
    In his book Economics as a Moral Science , Bernard Hodgson argues that economics is not value neutral as is often claimed, but is a value-laden discipline. In the long argument for this in his book, Hodgson never discusses or even mentions corporations. This article explains that corporations are absent from Hodgson’s discussion because he considers only the consumption side of general equilibrium theory (GET), and it shows that if Hodgson had included corporations and the production side, his overall (...)
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  49. R. Harré (1981). Creativity in Science. In Denis Dutton & Michael Krausz (eds.), The Concept of Creativity in Science and Art. Distributors for the U.S. And Canada, Kluwer Boston.score: 279.0
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  50. Ellen Handler Spitz (2014). Snapshots of Childhood Creativity in Science, Music, and Art: Richard Feynman, Clara Schumann, and René Magritte. Journal of Aesthetic Education 47 (4):1-13.score: 277.0
    This essay is prompted, in part, by a spate of alarmist articles in the media over the past several years concerning what journalists have called "the creativity crisis,"2 articles claiming, in other words, that American creativity is in decline. A corresponding call has arisen to seek remedies and determine how creativity might be fostered in the lives of children so as to stem the tide of this (alleged) decline. While taking these dramatic concerns and pronouncements cum grano salis, this article (...)
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