Search results for 'Credulity' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jean‐Franĉois Bonnefon (2004). Reinstatement, Floating Conclusions, and the Credulity of Mental Model Reasoning. Cognitive Science 28 (4):621-631.score: 15.0
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  2. William G. Lycan (2013). Phenomenal Conservatism and the Principle of Credulity. In Chris Tucker (ed.), Seemings and Justification: New Essays on Dogmatism and Phenomenal Conservatism. Oxford University Press. 293-305.score: 12.0
    Lycan (1985, 1988) defended a “Principle of Credulity”: “Accept at the outset each of those things that seem to be true” (1988, p. 165). Though that takes the form of a rule rather than a thesis, it does not seem very different from Huemer’s (2001, 2006, 2007) doctrine of phenomenal conservatism (PC): “If it seems to S that p , then, in the absence of defeaters, S thereby has at least some degree of justification for believing that p ” (...)
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  3. Jerome Gellman (2007). Credulity and Experience of God. Philo 10 (2):114-124.score: 12.0
    In this paper I argue that Richard Swinburne fails to adequately support his Principle of Credulity in favor of the validity of alleged experiences of God. I then formulate an alternative, analogical argument for the validity of alleged experiences of God from the validity of sense-perceptual experiences, and defend it against objections of Gale and Fales. But then I argue against trying to establish the validity of alleged experiences of God by analogy.
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  4. Peter Losin (1987). Experience of God and the Principle of Credulity. Faith and Philosophy 4 (1):59-70.score: 12.0
    The Principle of Credulity---i.e. that if I have an experience apparently of X then in the absence of good reasons to think the experience non-veridical I have evidence that X exists---is an essential premise in many formulations of the argument from religious experience. I defend this use of the principle against objections offered by William Rowe. I argue that experiences of God are checkable. and in ways (epistemically) significantly similar to the ways sensory experiences are checkable. and that treating (...)
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  5. Don Loeb (2007). The Argument From Moral Experience. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (5):469 - 484.score: 9.0
    It is often said that our moral experience, broadly construed to include our ways of thinking and talking about morality, has a certain objective-seeming character to it, and that this supports a presumption in favor of objectivist theories (according to which morality is a realm of facts or truths) and against anti-objectivist theories like Mackie’s error theory (according to which it is not). In this paper, I argue that our experience of morality does not support objectivist moral theories in this (...)
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  6. William L. Rowe (1982). Religious Experience and the Principle of Credulity. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 13 (2):85-92.score: 9.0
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  7. J. William Forgie (1986). The Principle of Credulity and the Evidential Value of Religious Experience. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 19 (3):145 - 159.score: 9.0
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  8. Michael Martin (1986). The Principle of Credulity and Religious Experience. Religious Studies 22 (1):79 - 93.score: 9.0
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  9. William Dembski, Evolution's Logic of Credulity: An Unfettered Response to Allen Orr.score: 9.0
    Allen Orr wrote an extended critical review (over 6000 words) of my book No Free Lunch for the Boston Review this summer (http://bostonreview.mit.edu/BR27.3/orr.html). The Boston Review subsequently contacted me and asked for a 1000 word response. I wrote a response of that length focusing on what I took to be the fundamental flaw in Orr's review (and indeed in Darwinian thinking generally, namely, conflating the realistically possible with the merely conceivable). What I didn't know (though I should have expected it) (...)
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  10. Max J. Skidmore (2011). On the Meeting of East and West: An Essay on Credulity. The European Legacy 16 (4):519 - 526.score: 9.0
    The European Legacy, Volume 16, Issue 4, Page 519-526, 01Jul2011.
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  11. Hendrik Hart (1994). Faith as Trust and Belief as Intellectual Credulity. Philosophy and Theology 8 (3):251-256.score: 9.0
    In response to the critique of his work by William Sweet, Hendrik Hart first offers some terminological clarifications. The important difference between ‘faith’ (trust in God) and ‘belief’ (our network of accepted understandings of things, expressed in concepts and propositions) is emphasized and his use of terms such as ‘religion,’ ‘knowledge,’ and ‘truth’ are explained. Hart then clarifies his approach to the Western philosophical tradition . He argues that Christian accommodation to philosophy and its idea of ‘reason’ as ultimate arbiter (...)
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  12. Carl Page (1989). Demonic Credulity and the Universalization of Cartesian Doubt. Southern Journal of Philosophy 27 (3):399-426.score: 9.0
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  13. Nicholas S. Thompson (2000). Evolutionary Psychology Can Ill Afford Adaptionist and Mentalist Credulity. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):1013-1014.score: 9.0
    The idea that dreams function as fright-simulations rests on the adaptionist notion that anything that has form has function, and psychological argument relies on the mentalist assumption that dream reports are accurate reports of experienced events. Neither assumption seems adequately supported by the evidence presented. [Revonsuo].
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  14. Paul L. Harris, Kathleen H. Corriveau, Elisabeth S. Pasquini, Melissa Koenig, Maria Fusaro & Fabrice Clément (2012). Credulity and the Development of Selective Trust in Early Childhood. In Michael Beran, Johannes Brandl, Josef Perner & Joëlle Proust (eds.), The Foundations of Metacognition. Oxford University Press. 193.score: 9.0
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  15. I. Testimony-Based Belief (2006). Testimony, Credulity, and Veracity. In Jennifer Lackey & Ernest Sosa (eds.), The Epistemology of Testimony. Oxford University Press. 25.score: 9.0
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  16. Shelagh Crooks (2005). Strong Credulity and Pro/Con Analysis. Teaching Philosophy 28 (1):45-57.score: 9.0
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  17. William Hare (2007). Credibility and Credulity: Monitoring Teachers for Trustworthiness. Journal of Philosophy of Education 41 (2):207–219.score: 9.0
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  18. David McCallam (2010). Credit and Credulity in Montesquieu's Lettres Persanes. Lumen: Selected Proceedings From the Canadian Society for Eighteenth-Century Studies 29:107.score: 9.0
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  19. Francis William Newman (2009). The Religious Mischiefs of Credulity. The Works of Francis William Newman on Religion 9:175-186.score: 9.0
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  20. Robert Audi (2006). Testimony, Credulity, and Veracity. In Jennifer Lackey & Ernest Sosa (eds.), The Epistemology of Testimony. Oxford University Press. 25--49.score: 9.0
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  21. E. T. Bell (1925). Mathematics and Credulity. Journal of Philosophy 22 (17):449-458.score: 9.0
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  22. Stephen Paul Foster (1995). Belief and Make-Believe: Critical Reflections on the Sources of Credulity. By G. A. Wells. The Modern Schoolman 72 (4):354-356.score: 9.0
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  23. Jon Palfreman (1979). Between Scepticism and Credulity: A Study of Victorian Scientific Attitudes to Modern Spiritualism. In Roy Wallis (ed.), On the Margins of Science: The Social Construction of Rejected Knowledge. University of Keele. 201--236.score: 9.0
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  24. James Van Cleve (2006). I. The Principles of Veracity and Credulity. In Jennifer Lackey & Ernest Sosa (eds.), The Epistemology of Testimony. Oxford University Press.score: 9.0
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  25. W. E. Ayton Wilkinson (1909). Credulity, Incredulity, and Immortality. The Monist 19 (3):461-468.score: 9.0
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  26. Jonathan L. Kvanvig (1984). Credulism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 16 (2):101 - 109.score: 6.0
    Some recent philosophers of religion have addressed the question of how, and whether it is possible, that the religious experiences some persons have had can give reasons for believing that God exists. Swinburne, for example, claims that what he calls the principle of credulity implies that the religious experiences of those that have them do provide evidence for others that God exists. He formulates the principle as follows: 1 (1) if it seems (epistemically) to a subject that x is (...)
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  27. Maurice Caveing (2007). Savoirs et sciences selon Gérard Simon. Revue d'Histoire des Sciences 1:203-216.score: 6.0
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  28. Wendy Kaminer (1999). Sleeping with Extra-Terrestrials: The Rise of Irrationalism and Perils of Piety. Pantheon Books.score: 6.0
    In Sleeping with Extra-Terrestrials , Wendy Kaminer argues that we are a society intoxicated by the irrational: religion, spirituality, and popular therapies threaten to replace rational thought with supernaturalism and impassioned but unexamined personal testimony. Ranging from our fascination with angels, aliens, and near- death experiences to the rise of junk science, the recovery movement, and the digital culture, Kaminer points out the amusing and ominous effects of our deference to spiritual authorities and resistance to critical thinking. She questions conventional (...)
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  29. Ricardo S. Silvestre (2012). Paranormal Modal Logic–Part I: The System K? And the Foundations of the Logic of Skeptical and Credulous Plausibility. Logic and Logical Philosophy 21 (1):65-96.score: 4.0
    In this two-parts paper we present paranormal modal logic: a modal logic which is both paraconsistent and paracomplete. Besides using a general framework in which a wide range of logics  including normal modal logics, paranormal modal logics and classical logic can be defined and proving some key theorems about paranormal modal logic (including that it is inferentially equivalent to classical normal modal logic), we also provide a philosophical justification for the view that paranormal modal logic is a formalization of (...)
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  30. Lloyd Gerson (2004). The Unity of Intellect in Aristotle's De Anima. Phronesis 49 (4):348-373.score: 3.0
    Desperately difficult texts inevitably elicit desperate hermeneutical measures. Aristotle's De Anima, book three, chapter five, is evidently one such text. At least since the time of Alexander of Aphrodisias, scholars have felt compelled to draw some remarkable conclusions regarding Aristotle's brief remarks in this passage regarding intellect. One such claim is that in chapter five, Aristotle introduces a second intellect, the so-called 'agent intellect', an intellect distinct from the 'passive intellect', the supposed focus of discussion up until this passage.1 This (...)
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  31. JIm Stone (2011). CORNEA, Scepticism and Evil. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 89 (1):59-70.score: 3.0


    The Principle of Credulity: 'It is basic to human knowledge of the world that we believe things are as they seem to be in the absence of positive evidence to the contrary' [Swinburne 1996: 133]. This underlies the Evidential Problem of Evil, which goes roughly like this: ‘There appears to be a lot of suffering, both animal and human, that does not result in an equal or greater utility. So there's probably some pointless suffering. As God's existence precludes pointless (...)
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  32. Colin Allen & Marc Bekoff (2007). Animal Minds, Cognitive Ethology, and Ethics. Journal of Ethics 11 (3):299-317.score: 3.0
    Our goal in this paper is to provide enough of an account of the origins of cognitive ethology and the controversy surrounding it to help ethicists to gauge for themselves how to balance skepticism and credulity about animal minds when communicating with scientists. We believe that ethicists’ arguments would benefit from better understanding of the historical roots of ongoing controversies. It is not appropriate to treat some widely reported results in animal cognition as if their interpretations are a matter (...)
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  33. Richard Wollheim (1991). The Cabinet of Dr. Lacan. Topoi 10 (2):163--174.score: 3.0
    Obscurity is not the worst failing, and it is philistinism to pretend that it is. In a series of brilliant essays written over the last fifteen years Stanley Cavell has consistently argued that more important than the question whether obscurity could have been avoided is whether it affects our confidence in the author. Confidence raises the issue of intention, and I would have thought that the primary commitment of a psychoanalytic writer was to pass on, and (if he can) to (...)
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  34. Nicholas Shackel (2013). Pseudoscience and Idiosyncratic Theories of Rational Belief. In M. Pigliucci & M. Boudry (eds.), The Philosophy of Pseudoscience. University of Chicago Press. 417.score: 3.0
    I take pseudoscience to be a pretence at science. Pretences are innumerable, limited only by our imagination and credulity. As Stove points out, ‘numerology is actually quite as different from astrology as astrology is from astronomy’ (Stove 1991, 187). We are sure that ‘something has gone appallingly wrong’ (Stove 1991, 180) and yet ‘thoughts…can go wrong in a multiplicity of ways, none of which anyone yet understands’ (Stove 1991, 190). Often all we can do is give a careful description (...)
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  35. Dominic Murphy (2005). Can Evolution Explain Insanity? Biology and Philosophy 20 (4):745-766.score: 3.0
    I distinguish three evolutionary explanations of mental illness: first, breakdowns in evolved computational systems; second, evolved systems performing their evolutionary function in a novel environment; third, evolved personality structures. I concentrate on the second and third explanations, as these are distinctive of an evolutionary psychopathology, with progressively less credulity in the light of the empirical evidence. General morals are drawn for evolutionary psychiatry.
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  36. H. G. Callaway (2003). The Esoteric Quine? Belief Attribution and the Significance of the Indeterminacy Thesis in Quine’s Kant Lectures. In , W.V. Quine, Wissenschaft und Empfindung. Frommann-Holzboog.score: 3.0
    This is the Introduction to my translation of Quine's Kant Lectures. Part of my interpretation is that an "esoteric doctrine" in involved in Quine's distinctive semantic claims: his skepticism of the credulity of non-expert evaluation of discourse and theory.
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  37. P. Faulkner (2002). On the Rationality of Our Response to Testimony. Synthese 131 (3):353 - 370.score: 3.0
    The assumption that we largely lack reasons for accepting testimony has dominated its epistemology. Given the further assumption that whatever reasons we do have are insufficient to justify our testimonial beliefs, many conclude that any account of testimonial knowledge must allow credulity to be justified. In this paper I argue that both of these assumptions are false. Our responses to testimony are guided by our background beliefs as to the testimony as a type, the testimonial situation, the testifier''s character (...)
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  38. Klaas J. Kraay (2007). Absence of Evidence and Evidence of Absence. Faith and Philosophy 24 (2):203-228.score: 3.0
    I defend the first premise of William Rowe’s well-known arguments from evil against influential criticisms due to William Alston. I next suggest that the central inference in Rowe’s arguments is best understood to move from the claim that we have an absence of evidence of a satisfactory theodicy to the claim that we have evidence of absence of such a theodicy. I endorse the view which holds that this move succeeds only if it is reasonable to believe that (roughly) if (...)
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  39. Quentin Smith (1992). The Anthropic Coincidences, Evil and the Disconfirmation of Theism. Religious Studies 28 (3):347 - 350.score: 3.0
    The anthropic principle or the associated anthropic coincidences have been used by philosophers such as John Leslie (1989), William Lane Craig (1988) and Richard Swinburne (1990) to support the thesis that God exists. In this paper I shall examine Swinburne's argument from the anthropic coincidences. I will show that Swinburne's premises, coupled with his principle of credulity and the failure of his theodicy in The Existence of God, disconfirms theism and confirms instead the hypothesis that there exists a malevolent (...)
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  40. Andrew Davis (2010). Defending Religious Pluralism for Religious Education. Ethics and Education 5 (3):189 - 202.score: 3.0
    Religious exclusivism, or the idea that only one religion can be true, fuels hatred and conflict in the modern world. Certain objections to religious pluralism, together with associated defences of exclusivism are flawed. I defend a moderate religious pluralism, according to which the truth of one religion does not automatically imply the falsity of others. The thought that we can respect persons even when holding them mistaken strains credulity when we are dealing with religious convictions. Moreover, exclusivism is informed (...)
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  41. James Pryor (2013). Problems for Credulism. In Chris Tucker (ed.), Seemings and Justification: New Essays on Dogmatism and Phenomenal Conservatism.score: 3.0
    We have several intuitive paradigms of defeating evidence. For example, let E be the fact that Ernie tells me that the notorious pet Precious is a bird. This supports the premise F, that Precious can fly. However, Orna gives me *opposing* evidence. She says that Precious (the same Precious) is a dog. Alternatively, defeating evidence might not oppose Ernie's testimony in that direct way. There might be other ways for it to weaken the support that Ernie's testimony gives me for (...)
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  42. Robert J. Yanal, The End of Suspicion: Hitchcock, Descartes, and Joan Fontaine.score: 3.0
    he most worrisome skeptical doubt Descartes raises in the first of his Meditations is the hypothesis of an evil deceiver. While it might seem plainly certain and indubitable that he is “sitting by the fire, wearing a winter cloak, holding this paper” in his hands, and so on, it is possible that all these—fire, cloak, paper, even hands—are illusions. “I will suppose, then, not that there is a supremely good God, the source of truth; but that there is an evil (...)
     
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  43. Robert J. Yanal (2000). Rebecca 's Deceivers. Philosophy and Literature 24 (1):67-82.score: 3.0
    In his Meditations Descartes tells us that he initially thought error might be avoided if he withheld assent “no less carefully from what is not plainly certain and indubitable than from what is obviously false.” For example, he thinks it plainly certain and indubitable that he is “sitting by the fire, wearing a winter cloak, holding this paper in my hands, and so on.” And yet even what is “plainly certain and indubitable” can be doubted. “I will suppose, then, not (...)
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  44. Alcuin Blamires (2006/2008). Chaucer, Ethics, and Gender. Oxford University Press.score: 3.0
    This book makes a vigorous reassessment of the moral dimension in Chaucer's writings. For the Middle Ages, the study of human behavior generally signified the study of the morality of attitudes, choices, and actions. Moreover, moral analysis was not gender neutral: it presupposed that certain virtues and certain failings were largely gender-specific. Alcuin Blamires, mainly concentrating on The Canterbury Tales, discloses how Chaucer adapts the composite inherited traditions of moral literature to shape the significance and the gender implications of his (...)
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  45. Brian M. Hughes (2006). Natural Selection and Religiosity: Validity Issues in the Empirical Examination of Afterlife Cognitions. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 29 (5):477-478.score: 3.0
    Bering's target article proposes that the tendency to believe in an afterlife emerged (in evolutionary history) in response to selective pressures unique to human societies. However, the empirical evidence presented fails to account for the broader social context that impinges upon researcher–participant interactions, and so fails to displace the more parsimonious explanation that it is childhood credulity that underlies the acquisition of afterlife beliefs through cultural exposure.
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  46. Klaas J. Kraay (2007). Absense of Evidence and Evidence of Absence. Faith and Philosophy 24 (2):203-228.score: 3.0
    I defend the first premise of William Rowe’s well-known arguments from evil against influential criticisms due to William Alston. I next suggest that the central inference in Rowe’s arguments is best understood to move from the claim that we have an absence of evidence of a satisfactory theodicy to the claim that we have evidence of absence of such a theodicy. I endorse the view which holds that this move succeeds only if it is reasonable to believe that (roughly) if (...)
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  47. William Hare (2003). Is It Good to Be Open-Minded? International Journal of Applied Philosophy 17 (1):73-87.score: 3.0
    Although open-mindedness is still widely regarded as an intellectual virtue and an aim of education, it is also commonly held that this attitude carries with it certain implications that ultimately threaten serious inquiry. In particular, open-mindedness is often thought (i) to encourage credulity, (ii) to discourage the formation of definite views, and (iii) to detract from the tenacious pursuit of an idea. These confusions turn up in the work of reputable philosophers and it is important to address them if (...)
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  48. James Beilby (1995). William Rowe on the Evidential Value of Appearances. Faith and Philosophy 12 (2):251-259.score: 3.0
    While William Rowe has argued that the principle of credulity does not lend justification to religious experience, he must affirm something quite like the principle of credulity in his empirical argument from evil. To do so Rowe has proposed a modified version of the principle of credulity.I shall argue that Rowe’s modified principle of credulity creates for him a dilemma regarding the justification of belief in other minds. I further suggest it is not adequate for bridging (...)
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  49. James R. Bennett (1983). Corporate Sponsored Image Films. Journal of Business Ethics 2 (1):35 - 41.score: 3.0
    The vast number of high quality corporate image and advocacy films, combined with the many other instruments of persuasion and control by corporations, powerfully direct the attitudes of the populace. In the absence of equal access, the best protection against deception from any powerful institution is skepticism — minds trained in critical thinking. But technically proficient, expensive films (costing from $50,00 to $600,000) encourage credulity instead of thought. The schools should train young people, therefore, how to resist corporate film (...)
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  50. Richard Brewer (1992). A Deficiency of Credulousness. Bioscience 42 (2):123-124.score: 3.0
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