Search results for 'Crime' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  8
    Richard Machalek & Lawrence E. Cohen (1991). The Nature of Crime. Human Nature 2 (3):215-233.
    The classical social theorist Emile Durkheim proposed the counterintuitive thesis that crime is beneficial for society because it provokes punishment, which enhances social solidarity. His logic, however, is blemished by a reified view of society that leads to group-selectionist thinking and a teleological account of the causes of crime. Reconceptualization of the relationship between crime and punishment in terms of evolutionary game theory, however, suggests that crime (cheating) may confer benefits on cooperating individuals by promoting stability (...)
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  2.  62
    Jesper Ryberg (2007). Privacy Rights, Crime Prevention, CCTV, and the Life of Mrs Aremac. Res Publica 13 (2):127-143.
    Over the past decade the use of closed circuit television (CCTV) as a means of crime prevention has reached unprecedented levels. Though critics of this development do not speak with one voice and have pointed to a number of different problems in the use of CCTV, one argument has played a dominant role in the debate, namely, that CCTV constitutes an unacceptable violation of people’s right to privacy. The purpose of this paper is to examine this argument critically. It (...)
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  3.  23
    Stuart Henry & Dena Plemmons (2012). Neuroscience, Neuropolitics and Neuroethics: The Complex Case of Crime, Deception and fMRI. Science and Engineering Ethics 18 (3):573-591.
    Scientific developments take place in a socio-political context but scientists often ignore the ways their innovations will be both interpreted by the media and used by policy makers. In the rush to neuroscientific discovery important questions are overlooked, such as the ways: (1) the brain, environment and behavior are related; (2) biological changes are mediated by social organization; (3) institutional bias in the application of technical procedures ignores race, class and gender dimensions of society; (4) knowledge is used to the (...)
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  4.  63
    Sergio Tonkonoff (2014). Crime as the Limit of Culture. Human Studies 37 (4):529-544.
    In this article culture is understood as the ensemble of systems of classification, assessment, and interaction that establishes a basic community of values in a given social field. We will argue that this is made possible through the institution of fundamental prohibitions understood as mythical points of closure that set the last frontiers of that community by designating what crime is. Exploring these theses, we will see that criminal transgression may be thought of as the actualization of a rigorous (...)
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  5.  13
    Chris Baber (2010). Distributed Cognition at the Crime Scene. AI and Society 25 (4):423-432.
    The examination of a scene of crime provides both an interesting case study and analogy for consideration of Distributed Cognition. In this paper, Distribution is defined by the number of agents involved in the criminal justice process, and in terms of the relationship between a Crime Scene Examiner and the environment being searched.
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  6.  8
    Ben O'Neill & Walter Block (2013). Inchoate Crime, Accessories, and Constructive Malice in Libertarian Law. Libertarian Papers 5 (2):241-271.
    Inchoate crime consists of acts that are regarded as crimes despite the fact that they are only partial or incomplete in some respect. This includes acts that do not succeed in physically harming the victim or are only indirectly related to such a result. Examples include attempts (as in attempted murder that does not eventuate in the killing of anyone), conspiracy (in which case the crime has only been planned, not yet acted out) and incitement (where the inciter (...)
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  7.  5
    Adam B. Shniderman & Lauren B. Solberg (2015). Cosmetic Psychopharmacology for Prisoners: Reducing Crime and Recidivism Through Cognitive Intervention. Neuroethics 8 (3):315-326.
    Criminologists have long acknowledged the link between a number of cognitive deficits, including low intelligence and impulsivity, and crime. A new wave of research has demonstrated that pharmacological intervention can restore or improve cognitive function, particularly executive function, and restore neural plasticity. Such restoration and improvement can allow for easier acquisition of new skills and as a result, presents significant possibilities for the criminal justice system. For example, studies have shown that supplements of Omega-3, a fatty acid commonly found (...)
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  8.  12
    Shachar Eldar (2010). Punishing Organized Crime Leaders for the Crimes of Their Subordinates. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (2):183-196.
    The intuition holding that an organized crime leader should be punished more severely than a subordinate who directly commits an offence is commonly reflected in legal literature. However, positing a direct relationship between the severity of punishment and the level of seniority within an organizational hierarchy represents a departure from a more general idea found in much of the substantive criminal law writings: that the severity of punishment increases the closer the proximity to the physical commission of the offence. (...)
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  9.  12
    Aurelijus Gutauskas (2011). Economic Crisis and Organized Crime in Lithuania. Jurisprudence 18 (1):303-326.
    Tendencies of organized crime in the context of economical crisis are dealt in the article. The author shows his own position about the economical crisis and how it influenced organized crime in Lithuania. The reasons of economical crisis, characteristics and peculiarities of crimes of organized groups, which operate in Lithuania, are discussed in the article. The author reveals specific features, which enable to evaluate the real influence of organized groups to the economical state of Lithuania.
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  10.  11
    Vernon L. Quinsey, Martin L. Lalumière, Matthew Querée & Jennifer K. McNaughton (1999). Perceived Crime Severity and Biological Kinship. Human Nature 10 (4):399-414.
    Two predictions concerning the perceived severity of crimes can be derived from evolutionary theory. The first, arising from the theory of inclusive fitness, is that crimes in general should be viewed as more serious to the degree that the victim is genetically related to the perpetrator. The second, arising from the deleterious effects of inbreeding depression, is that heterosexual sexual coercion should be perceived as more serious the closer the genetic relationship of victim and perpetrator, particularly when the victim is (...)
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  11.  17
    Shachar Eldar (2012). Holding Organized Crime Leaders Accountable for the Crimes of Their Subordinates. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (2):207-225.
    Criminal law doctrine fails to provide an adequate solution for imputing responsibility to organized crime leaders for the offenses committed by their subordinates. This undesirable state of affairs is made possible because criminal organizations adopt complex organizational structures that leave their superiors beyond the reach of the law. These structures are characterized by features such as the isolation of the leadership from junior ranks, decentralized management, and mechanisms encouraging initiative from below. They are found in criminal organizations such as (...)
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  12.  5
    Justinas Žilinskas (2012). Introduction of 'Crime of Denial'in the Lithuanian Criminal Law and First Instances of its Application. Jurisprudence 19 (1):315-329.
    The present article analyses the so-called ‘crime of denial’ recently established in Article 1702 of the Lithuanian Criminal Code. It describes how this crime was introduced in the Lithuanian Law, and the reasons for its present form and challenges. The crime has been applied in two instances (Stankeras case and Paleckis case). The author discusses these two instances of application, critically reviews the arguments of the Prosecutor’s Office and of the court of first instance and shows that (...)
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  13.  15
    Marilynn P. Fleckenstein & John C. Bowes (2000). When Trust is Betrayed: Religious Institutions and White Collar Crime. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 23 (1):111 - 115.
    In 1990, the comptroller of the Catholic Diocese of Buffalo was charged with the embezzlement of eight million dollars of money belonging to the Diocese, He was subsequently convicted and served several years in state prison. Using this case as a starting point, this paper looks at several examples of white-collar crime and religious institutions. Should justice or mercy be the operative virtue in dealing with such criminals?
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  14.  11
    Michael Riesen & Gursel Serpen (2008). Validation of a Bayesian Belief Network Representation for Posterior Probability Calculations on National Crime Victimization Survey. Artificial Intelligence and Law 16 (3):245-276.
    This paper presents an effort to induce a Bayesian belief network (BBN) from crime data, namely the national crime victimization survey (NCVS). This BBN defines a joint probability distribution over a set of variables that were employed to record a set of crime incidents, with particular focus on characteristics of the victim. The goals are to generate a BBN to capture how characteristics of crime incidents are related to one another, and to make this information available (...)
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  15.  2
    Edin Sued Abumanssur (2014). Fé e crime na “quebrada”: pentecostais e PCC na construção da sociabilidade nas periferias de São Paulo (Faith and crime in the "quebrada": Pentecostalism and PCC in the construction of sociability in the outskirts of São Paulo). Horizonte 12 (33):99-120.
    Fé e crime na “quebrada”: pentecostais e PCC na construção da sociabilidade nas periferias de São Paulo (Faith and crime in the "quebrada": Pentecostalism and PCC in the construction of sociability in the outskirts of São Paulo). DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2014v12n33p99 Tratamos, neste texto, da convivência em um mesmo ambiente urbano de fenômenos aparentemente díspares como é o caso do pentecostalismo de um lado e, de outro, o crime organizado e a violência como seu modus operandi , ambos representando (...)
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  16.  1
    E. Whyte (2009). Aluta Continua: The Struggle Continues in South Africa - Against Violent Crime. Dialogue 7 (1):1-30.
    Concerns for safety and security as South Africa’s hosting of 2010 FIFA World Cup draws nearer highlight the degree to which South Africa’s reputation for a relatively peaceful transition from Apartheid has been replaced by its reputation for violent crime. Its transition, and the peacebuilding efforts that followed it, are not completely unrelated to its current high levels of violent crime. In fact, this article argues that there were a number of issues South Africa’s peacebuilding process failed to (...)
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  17. Alfredas Kiškis & Aušra Kuodytė (2012). Investigation of the Preparation of Crime Prevention Programmes in Lithuania. Jurisprudence 19 (2):771-801.
    The article focuses on the analysis of preparation of crime prevention programmes in Lithuania and assesses their level of compliance with the methodological requirements for programme preparation. Many crime prevention programmes are approved and implemented at national level in Lithuania. If such programmes were prepared in accordance with the principles and methods recommended in the scientific literature, the efficiency of crime prevention programmes would undoubtedly increase. In Lithuania, a number of studies on the efficiency of the existing (...)
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  18.  33
    Sonu Bedi (2011). Why a Criminal Prohibition on Sex Selective Abortions Amounts to a Thought Crime. Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (3):349-360.
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  19.  6
    Joseph Steven Yanick (2015). Fran Mason Hollywood's Detective: Crime Series in the 1930s and 1940s From the Whodunnit to Hard-Boiled Noir. Film-Philosophy 19.
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  20.  8
    Keith Guzik (2013). Security a la Mexicana: On the Particularities of Security Governance in México's War on Crime. [REVIEW] Theory and Society 42 (2):161-187.
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  21.  2
    M. Hamilton, F. Salim, E. Cheng & S. L. Choy (2011). Transafe: A Crowdsourced Mobile Platform for Crime and Safety Perception Management. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 41 (2):32-37.
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  22. Stanley J. [from old catalog] Rowland (1963). Ethics, Crime and Redemption. Philadelphia, Westminster Press.
     
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  23. Jon Thompson (1993). Fiction, Crime, and Empire Clues to Modernity and Postmodernism. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
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  24. Matti Tolvanen (2009). Trust, Business Ethics and Crime Prevention – Corporate Criminal Liability in Finland. Jurisprudence 115 (1):335-358.
    According to the Finnish Penal Code a corporation may be sentenced to a corporate fine if a person who is part of its statutory organ or other management or who exercises actual decision-making authority therein 1) has been an accomplice in an offence or allowed the commission of the offence, or 2) if the care and diligence necessary for the prevention of the offence has not been observed in the operations of the corporation. Criminal liability of legal persons is based (...)
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  25.  50
    Neil Levy (2015). Less Blame, Less Crime? The Practical Implications of Moral Responsibility Skepticism. Journal of Practical Ethics 3 (2):1-17.
    Most philosophers believe that wrongdoers sometimes deserve to be punished by long prison sentences. They also believe that such punishments are justified by their consequences: they deter crime and incapacitate potential offenders. In this article, I argue that both these claims are false. No one deserves to be punished, I argue, because our actions are shot through with direct or indirect luck. I also argue that there are good reasons to think that punishing fewer people and much less harshly (...)
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  26.  16
    Sally Ramage (2016). GENETICS CRIME AND JUSTICE, EDWARD ELGAR 2015. Current Criminal Law 9 (3):2-29.
    The UK government decided to introduce Income Tax in 1799. Later, tax avoidance schemes involved creation of Deeds of Convenant. It is a fact that crime is increasing but the number of people committing crime is not increasing because many crimes are repeated crimes committed by persons with habitual criminal behaviour, ie hard-core criminals. -/- For more than half a century now, there has been scientific evidence that <span class='Hi'>genetics</span> plays a key role in the origins of (...)
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  27. Jeremy Horder (2004). Excusing Crime. OUP Oxford.
    When should someone who may have intentionally or knowingly committed criminal wrongdoing be excused? Excusing Crime examines what excusing conditions are, and why familiar excuses, such as duress, are thought to fulfil those conditions. Setting himself against the 'classical' view of excuses, which has a long heritage, and is enshrined in different forms in many of the world's criminal codes, both liberal and non-liberal; Jeremy Horder argues that it is now time to move forwards. He contends that a wider (...)
     
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  28.  6
    Chris Baber, Paul Smith, James Cross, John Hunter & Richard McMaster (2006). Crime Scene Investigation and Distributed Cognition. Pragmatics and Cognition 14 (2):357-386.
    Crime scene investigation is a form of Distributed Cognition. The principal concept we explore in this paper is that of `resource for action'. It is proposed that crime scene investigation employs four primary resources-for-action: the environment, or scene itself, which affords particular forms of search and object retrieval; the retrieved objects, which afford translation into evidence; the procedures that guide investigation, which both constrain the search activity and also provide opportunity for additional activity; the narratives that different agents (...)
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  29. Sarah K. Paul (2014). Embarking on a Crime. In Enrique Villanueva V. (ed.), Law and the Philosophy of Action. Rodopi 101-24.
    When we define something as a crime, we generally thereby criminalize the attempt to commit that crime. However, it is a vexing puzzle to specify what must be the case in order for a criminal attempt to have occurred, given that the results element of the crime fails to come about. I argue that the philosophy of action can assist the criminal law in clarifying what kinds of events are properly categorized as criminal attempts. A natural thought (...)
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  30.  37
    Jonathan A. Hughes & Monique Jonas (2015). Time and Crime: Which Cold-Case Investigations Should Be Reheated. Criminal Justice Ethics 34 (1):18-41.
    Advances in forensic techniques have expanded the temporal horizon of criminal investigations, facilitating investigation of historic crimes that would previously have been considered unsolvable. Public enthusiasm for pursuing historic crimes is exemplified by recent high-profile trials of celebrities accused of historic sexual offences. These circumstances give new urgency to the question of how we should decide which historic offences to investigate. A satisfactory answer must take into account the ways in which the passage of time can erode the benefits of (...)
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  31. John J. Donohue (2007). Economic Models of Crime and Punishment. Social Research: An International Quarterly 74 (2):379-412.
    Over the last forty-five years, there have been three monumental stories on the national American crime scene: a run up in crime in the 1960s, a move towards a more punitive American justice system starting in the 1970s, and a strong decline in US crime rates beginning in the 1990s. At the center of understanding these three stories lies Gary Becker's pioneering work on the economics of crime . Becker offered a price theoretical model in which (...)
     
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  32.  71
    Candice Delmas (2014). The Civic Duty to Report Crime and Corruption. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 9 (1):50-64.
    Is the civic duty to report crime and corruption a genuine moral duty? After clarifying the nature of the duty, I consider a couple of negative answers to the question, and turn to an attractive and commonly held view, according to which this civic duty is a genuine moral duty. On this view, crime and corruption threaten political stability, and citizens have a moral duty to report crime and corruption to the government in order to help the (...)
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  33. Jean Baudrillard (1996/2008). The Perfect Crime. Verso Books.
    The perfect crime -- The spectre of the will -- The radical illusion -- Trompe-l'œl genesis -- The automatic writing of the world -- The horizon of disappearance -- The countdown -- The material illusion -- The secret vestiges of perfection -- The height of reality -- The irony of technology -- Machinic snobbery -- Objects in this mirror -- The Babel syndrome -- Radical thought -- The other side of the crime -- The world without women -- (...)
     
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  34. Nicholas Dixon (1999). Handguns, Violent Crime, and Self-Defense. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 13 (2):239-260.
    By far the most plausible explanation of data on violent crime in the United States is that its high handgun ownership rate is a major causal factor. The only realistic way to significantly reduce violent crime in this country is an outright ban on private ownership of handguns. While such a ban would undeniably restrict one particular freedom, it would violate no rights. In particular, the unquestioned right to self-defense does not entail a right to own handguns, because (...)
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  35.  28
    Christopher Bennett (2006). State Denunciation of Crime. Journal of Moral Philosophy 3 (3):288-304.
    In this paper I am concerned with a problem for communicative theories of punishment. On such theories, punishment is justified at least in part as the authoritative censure or condemnation of crime. But is this compatible with a broadly liberal political outlook? For while liberalism is generally thought to take only a very limited interest in its citizens’ attitudes (seeing moral opinion as a matter of legitimate debate), the idea of state denunciation of crime seems precisely to be (...)
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  36.  17
    Grant Lamond (2007). What is a Crime? Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 27 (4):609-632.
    This article presents a philosophical account of the nature of crime. It argues that the criminal law contains both fault-based crimes and strict liability offences, and that these two represent different paradigms of liability. It goes on to argue that the gist of fault-based crimes lies in their being public wrongs, not (as is often thought) because they wrong the public, but because the public is responsible for punishing them, i.e. because they merit state punishment. What makes wrongs deserving (...)
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  37.  66
    Keith Burgess-Jackson (ed.) (1999). A Most Detestable Crime: New Philosophical Essays on Rape. Oxford University Press.
    This collection of original essays by leading philosophers probes the philosophical aspects of rape in all of its manifestations: act, crime, practice, and institution. Among the issues examined are the nature of rape; the wrongfulness and harmfulness of rape; the relation of rape to racism, sexism, classism, and other forms of oppression; and the legitimacy of various rape-law doctrines. Each contributor advances a novel argument and seeks to disentangle the conceptual, evaluative, and empirical issues that arise in connection with (...)
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  38.  7
    Giuseppe Mannino & Serena Giunta (2015). Psychodynamics of the Mafia Phenomenon: Psychological–Clinical Research on Environmental Tapping and White-Collar Crime. World Futures 71 (5-8):185-201.
    For many years, psychological–clinical research has been aiming at studying the Mafia from different viewpoints: the man of honor's inner world, relational and psychopathological structures of his family matrices, connections between inner and social worlds, interiorized and social rules. Today, however, a complex phenomenon has come to light, which concerns the great connection between the Mafia and financial crime, and for us as researchers it is very interesting and complicated to analyze, because it involves the study of psychological peculiarities (...)
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  39.  8
    Deborah Jermyn (2013). Labs and Slabs: Television Crime Drama and the Quest for Forensic Realism. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (1):103-109.
    This essay examines how crime dramas produced during, and since, the 1990s became marked by the quest for ‘forensic realism’. In particular, the essay traces a landmark shift in the development of forensic realism in the form of the ground-breaking British police drama Prime Suspect in 1991. It is argued that this television series not only represents a turning point in television history, but that it also constitutes a key text in the broader cultural turn towards forensic fascination. Prime (...)
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  40.  19
    Ekow N. Yankah (2012). Crime, Freedom and Civic Bonds: Arthur Ripstein's Force and Freedom: Kant's Legal and Political Philosophy. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (2):255-272.
    There is no question Arthur Ripstein’s Force and Freedom is an engaging and powerful book which will inform legal philosophy, particularly Kantian theories, for years to come. The text explores with care Kant’s legal and political philosophy, distinguishing it from his better known moral theory. Nor is Ripstein’s book simply a recounting of Kant’s legal and political theory. Ripstein develops Kant’s views in his own unique vision illustrating fresh ways of viewing the entire Kantian project. But the same strength and (...)
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  41.  49
    Mohamad Al-Hakim (2010). Making Room for Hate Crime Legislation in Liberal Societies. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (3):341-358.
    There is a divide within political and legal theory concerning the justification of hate-crime legislation in liberal states. Opponents of Hate-Crime Legislation have recently argued that enhanced punishment for hate-motivated crimes cannot be justified within political liberal states. More specifically, Heidi Hurd argues that criminal sanction which target character dispositions unfairly target individuals for characteristics not readily under their control. She further argues that a ‘character’ based approach in criminal law is necessarily illiberal and violates the state’s (...)
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  42.  78
    Ian Howard Dennis (2009). On Necessity as a Defence to Crime: Possibilities, Problems and the Limits of Justification and Excuse. Criminal Law and Philosophy 3 (1):29-49.
    The article reviews recent developments in England in the law of necessity as a defence to crime and calls for its further extension. It argues that the defence of necessity presents the criminal law with difficult questions of competing values and the ordering of harms. English law has taken a nuanced position on the respective roles of the courts and the legislature in the ordering of harms, although the development of the law has been pragmatic rather than coherently theorised. (...)
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  43.  8
    Sandra E. Marshall (2004). Victims of Crime: Their Station and its Duties. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 7 (2):104-117.
    The shift from a welfarist to a retributivist perspective on crime, which is one of the themes of David Garland?s book, has brought with it a renewed emphasis on the victims of crime and their rights. This shift in emphasis, I suggest, raises questions about the way we think of the relationship between individual citizens and between citizens and the state. Different political theories will produce different accounts of this relationship and hence different ways of characterising the status (...)
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  44.  13
    Maximiliano E. Korstanje (2009). Delinquency, Crime and Order Under Debate. Cultura 6 (1):119-129.
    Western societies characterize by promoting material well-being enrooted in legal-rational administration as a form of development. Although, the study of crime has been broadly studied in recent years, many scholars devoted attention in analysing the bridge between authority and penitentiaries. This paper obliges us to rethink the relationship between mythopoeia, punishment and crime. Social deviation is often represented as a taboo wherein offender is loathed. Each group in different ways legitimates their own ways of economical production. Our modern (...)
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  45.  60
    Nenad Dimitrijevic (2010). Moral Knowledge and Mass Crime: A Critical Reading of Moral Relativism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (2):131-156.
    In this article I ask how moral relativism applies to the analysis of responsibility for mass crime. The focus is on the critical reading of two influential relativist attempts to offer a theoretically consistent response to the challenges imposed by extreme criminal practices. First, I explore Gilbert Harman’s analytical effort to conceptualize the reach of moral discourse. According to Harman, mass crime creates a contextually specific relationship to which moral judgments do not apply any more. Second, I analyze (...)
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  46.  6
    Benjamin Sachs (2015). The Crime of Self‐Solicitation. Ratio Juris 28 (2):180-203.
    I hold that we could justifiably criminalize some threats, on account of the fact that issuing them renders one more likely to commit a crime. But I also point out that if we criminalize some threat-issuing, we will de facto criminalize some warning-issuing, which is unjust. So we ought not to criminalize any threat-issuing. Instead, we should criminalize rendering oneself more likely to commit a crime. This would allow us to punish all the threat-issuers we should want to (...)
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  47.  64
    Gerald Dworkin (1985). The Serpent Beguiled Me and I Did Eat: Entrapment and the Creation of Crime. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 4 (1):17 - 39.
    This paper examines the legitimacy of pro-active law enforcement techniques, i.e. the use of deception to produce the performance of a criminal act in circumstances where it can be observed by law enforcement officials. It argues that law enforcement officials should only be allowed to create the intent to commit a crime in individuals who they have probable cause to suppose are already engaged or intending to engage in criminal activity of a similar nature.
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  48.  4
    Richard Vernon (2013). Crime Against Humanity: A Defence of the ‘Subsidiarity’ View. Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 26 (1):229-242.
    “ Subsidiarity ” views of crime against humanity propose that state crime is at the core of the idea, thus necessitating a further level of authority. That proposal can be given a strong moral justification in terms of the enormous risks that arise from a state’s authority and territorial control. Discussions of crime against humanity by Larry May and Norman Geras, however, offer different views of the idea, May proposing that it be seen as group-based crime, (...)
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  49.  8
    Harlan Koff (2009). Macro-Lessons From Micro-Crime: Understanding Migrant Crime Through the Comparative Examination of Local Markets. Theoria 56 (121):92-117.
    Immigration politics are almost universally characterized by their complexity, their ability to raise public passions, and misinformation, often based on generalizations and stereotypes. Recently, immigration has been intrinsically linked to crime, and public agendas have squarely focused on security issues as nativist political forces have successfully created a prominent image of migrants as threats to public security. This article argues that immigrant participation in criminal markets should be studied at the local level, where micro-criminal economies often dominated by migrants (...)
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  50. Jay Joseph (2001). Is Crime in the Genes? A Critical Review of Twin and Adoption Studies of Criminality and Antisocial Behavior. Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (2):179-218.
    This paper performs a critical review of twin and adoption studies looking at possible genetic factors in criminal and antisocial behavior. While most modern researchers acknowledge that family studies are unable to separate possible genetic and environmental influences, it is argued here that twin studies are similarly unable to disentangle these influences. The twin method of monozygotic–dizygotic comparison is predicated on the assumption that both types of twins share equal environments, and it is argued here that this assumption is false. (...)
     
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