Search results for 'Criminal justice, Administration of' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Ian Marsh (2004). Criminal Justice: An Introduction to Philosophies, Theories and Practice. Routledge.score: 684.0
    This new text will encourage students to develop a deeper understanding of the context and the current workings of the criminal justice system. Part One offers a clear, accessible and comprehensive review of the major philosophical aims and sociological theories of punishment, the history of justice and punishment, and the developing perspective of victimology. In Part Two, the focus is on the main areas of the contemporary criminal justice system including the police, the courts and judiciary, prisons, and (...)
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  2. David J. Cornwell (2006). Criminal Punishment and Restorative Justice: Past, Present, and Future Perspectives. North American Distributor, International Specialised Book Services.score: 600.0
    Provides an international perspective as to the potential of restorative justice to * Deliver better ways of dealing with offenders and victims * Reduce the use ...
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  3. Alan W. Norrie (2000). Punishment, Responsibility, and Justice: A Relational Critique. Oxford University Press.score: 558.0
    This book addresses the retributive and "orthodox subjectivist" theories that dominate criminal justice theory alongside recent "revisionist" and "postmodern" approaches. Norrie argues that all these approaches, together with their faults and contradictions, stem from their orientation to themes in Kantian moral philosophy. He explores an alternative relational or dialectical approach; examines the work of Ashworth, Duff, Fletcher, Moore, Smith, and Williams; and considers key doctrinal issues.
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  4. Patrick Kerans (1982). Punishment Vs. Reconciliation: Retributive Justice and Social Justice in the Light of Social Ethics. Queen's Theological College.score: 552.0
     
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  5. Lucinda Vandervort (2012). Access to Justice and the Public Interest in the Administration of Justice. University of New Brunswick Law Journal 63:124-144.score: 526.5
    The public interest in the administration of justice requires access to justice for all. But access to justice must be “meaningful” access. Meaningful access requires procedures, processes, and institutional structures that facilitate communication among participants and decision-makers and ensure that judges and other decision-makers have the resources they need to render fully informed and sound decisions. Working from that premise, which is based on a reconceptualization of the objectives and methods of the justice process, the author proposes numerous specific (...)
     
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  6. Le Cheng (2011). Administration of Justice and Multimodality in Media: Semiotic Translation, Conflict and Compatibility. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 24 (4):491-502.score: 522.0
    Law as one sign system can be recorded and interpreted by another sign system—media. If each transaction in court is taken as a sign, it can be interpreted or transferred by different signs of media for the same purpose, though with different effects. This study focuses on the transformative effects of the semiotic revolution in media on law. The present research revealed that the evolution of media has driven the administration of justice to pay more attention to the process (...)
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  7. François Tanguay-Renaud (2013). Victor's Justice: The Next Best Moral Theory of Criminal Punishment? [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 32 (1):129-157.score: 486.0
    In this essay, I address one methodological aspect of Victor Tadros's The Ends of Harm-­-­namely, the moral character of the theory of criminal punishment it defends. First, I offer a brief reconstruction of this dimension of the argument, highlighting some of its distinctive strengths while drawing attention to particular inconsistencies. I then argue that Tadros ought to refrain from developing this approach in terms of an overly narrow understanding of the morality of harming as fully unified and reconciled under (...)
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  8. Lucinda Vandervort (2012). Legal Subversion of the Criminal Justice Process? Judicial, Prosecutorial and Police Discretion in Edmondson, Kindrat and Brown. In Elizabeth Sheehy (ed.), SEXUAL ASSAULT IN CANADA: LAW, LEGAL PRACTICE & WOMEN'S ACTIVISM, Chapter 6, pp. 113-153. University of Ottawa Press.score: 480.0
    In 2001, three non-Aboriginal men in their twenties were charged with the sexual assault of a twelve year old Aboriginal girl in rural Saskatchewan. Legal proceedings lasted almost seven years and included two preliminary hearings, two jury trials, two retrials with juries, and appeals to the provincial appeal court and the Supreme Court of Canada. One accused was convicted. The case raises questions about the administration of justice in sexual assault cases in Saskatchewan. Based on observation and analysis of (...)
     
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  9. Margaret R. Holmgren (2012). Forgiveness and Retribution: Responding to Wrongdoing. Cambridge University Press.score: 456.0
    Machine generated contents note: 1. Introduction and overview; 2. The nature of forgiveness and resentment; 3. The moral analysis of the attitudes of forgiveness and resentment defined; 4. The moral analysis of the attitudes of self-forgiveness and self-condemnation; 5. Philosophical underpinnings of the basic attitudes: forgiveness, resentment, and the nature of persons; 6. Moral theory: justice and desert; 7. The public response to wrongdoing; 8. Restorative justice: the public response to wrongdoing and the process of addressing the wrong.
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  10. Alejandro Chehtman (2010). The Philosophical Foundations of Extraterritorial Punishment. Oxford University Press.score: 456.0
    This book provides the first full account, explanation, and critique of extraterritorial punishment in international law.
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  11. Penny Green & Andrew Rutherford (eds.) (2000). Criminal Policy Transition. Hart Pub..score: 456.0
    In this sense the collection offers a model of how international collaborative work should proceed. The book is the product of a workshop held at the International Institute for the Sociology of Law (IISL) in Onati, Spain.
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  12. Lucinda Vandervort (2001). Mistake of Law and Obstruction of Justice: A 'Bad Excuse' ... Even for a Lawyer! University of New Brunswick Law Journal 50: 171-186.score: 450.0
    In Regina v. Murray, (2000, Ont S.Ct.J.) the learned trial judge, Justice Gravely, errs in his interpretation and application of the law of mens rea in the offense of willfully attempting to obstruct justice under section 139(2) of the Criminal Code of Canada. In view of his findings of fact and law, including the determination that the accused knowingly and intentionally committed the actus reus of the offense and the absence of any suggestion that he lacked awareness of any (...)
     
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  13. David J. Cornwell (2009). The Penal Crisis and the Clapham Omnibus: Questions and Answers in Restorative Justice. North American Distributor, International Specialised Book Services.score: 444.0
    Designed for a wide readership, this book looks at the proble.
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  14. Christian Nadeau & Marion Vacheret (eds.) (2005). Le Châtiment: Histoire, Philosophie Et Pratiques de la Justice Pénale. Liber.score: 444.0
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  15. Telford Taylor (1975). Perspectives on Justice. Northwestern University Press.score: 444.0
  16. Kimberley Brownlee (2010). Responsibilities of Criminal Justice Officials. Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):123-139.score: 432.0
    In recent years, political philosophers have hotly debated whether ordinary citizens have a general pro tanto moral obligation to follow the law. Contemporary philosophers have had less to say about the same question when applied to public officials. In this paper, I consider the latter question in the morally complex context of criminal justice. I argue that criminal justice officials have no general pro tanto moral obligation to adhere to the legal dictates and lawful rules of their offices. (...)
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  17. Dejan Guzina & Branka Marijan (2013). Local Uses of International Criminal Justice in Bosnia-Herzegovina: Transcending Divisions or Building Parallel Worlds? Studies in Social Justice 7 (2):245-263.score: 418.5
    Transitionaljustice mechanisms and the International Criminal Tribunal for the FormerYugoslavia (ICTY) have had only a limited success in overcoming ethnic divisionsin Bosnia-Herzegovina. Rather than elaborating upon the role of local politicalelites in perpetuating ethnic divisions, we examine ordinary peoples’ popularperceptions of war and its aftermath. In our view, the idea that elites havecomplete control over the broader narratives about the past is misplaced. Weargue that transitional justice and peace mechanisms supported by externalactors are always interpreted on the ground in (...)
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  18. Sŏng-jo An (2011). Hyŏndae Hyŏngpŏphak: Iron Kwa Pangbŏp. Kyŏngin Munhwasa.score: 408.0
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  19. Nicolas Catelan (2004). L'influence de Cesare Beccaria Sur la Matière Pénale Moderne. Presses Universitaires d'Aix-Marseille.score: 408.0
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  20. Richard Dubé, Margarita Garcia & Maíra Rocha Machado (eds.) (2013). La Rationalité Pénale Moderne: Réflexions Théoriques Et Explorations Empiriques. Presses de l'Université D'Ottawa.score: 408.0
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  21. Aleksandar Fatić (2010). Uloga Kazne U Savremenoj Poliarhičnoj Demokratiji. Institute for International Politics and Economics.score: 408.0
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  22. Mike I. Isokun (2004). Men and Their Laws: An Enquiry Into Why Men Are Unable to Obey the Laws They Make. Ambrose Alli University Pub..score: 408.0
     
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  23. Howard Zehr (2006). El Pequeño Libro de la Justicia Restaurativa. Good Books.score: 408.0
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  24. Hong Xiao (2008). Lun Xing Fa de Tiao Zheng Dui Xiang. Zhongguo Jian Cha Chu Ban She.score: 402.0
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  25. Barbara Baum Levenbook (1982). Review Essay / A Theory of Criminal Justice. Criminal Justice Ethics 1 (2):60-64.score: 382.5
    Hyman Gross, A Theory of Criminal Justice New York: Oxford University Press, 1979, xviii + 521 pp.
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  26. C. L. ten (1991). Review Essay / Dominion as the Target of Criminal Justice. Criminal Justice Ethics 10 (2):40-46.score: 382.5
    John Braithwaite and Philip Pettit, Not Just Deserts: A Republican Theory of Criminal Justice, Oxford Clarendon Press, 1990, vii + 229 pp.
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  27. David Shaw, Karyn McCluskey, Will Linden & Christine Goodall (2012). Reducing the Harmful Effects of Alcohol Misuse: The Ethics of Sobriety Testing in Criminal Justice. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):669-671.score: 382.5
    Alcohol use and abuse play a major role in both crime and negative health outcomes in Scotland. This paper provides a description and ethical and legal analysis of a novel remote alcohol monitoring scheme for offenders which seeks to reduce alcohol-related harm to both the criminal and the public. It emerges that the prospective benefits of this scheme to health and public order vastly outweigh any potential harms.
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  28. Thomas Weigend (2014). Assuming That the Defendant Is Not Guilty: The Presumption of Innocence in the German System of Criminal Justice. Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (2):285-299.score: 382.5
    The presumption of innocence is not a presumption but an assumption or legal fiction. It requires agents of the state to treat a suspect or defendant in the criminal process as if he were in fact innocent. The presumption of innocence has a limited field of application. It applies only to agents of the state, and only during the criminal process. The presumption of innocence as such does not determine the amount of evidence necessary to find a defendant (...)
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  29. René Foqué (2008). Criminal Justice in a Democracy: Towards a Relational Conception of Criminal Law and Punishment. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (3):207-227.score: 369.0
    This article starts from the observation that in classical Athens the discovery of democracy as a normative model of politics has been from the beginning not only a political and a legal but at the same time a philosophical enterprise. Reflections on the concept of criminal law and on the meaning of punishment can greatly benefit from reflections on Athenian democracy as a germ for our contemporary debate on criminal justice in a democracy. Three main characteristics of the (...)
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  30. Wesley Cragg (1992). The Practice of Punishment: Towards a Theory of Restorative Justice. Routledge.score: 366.0
    In the latter half of the twentieth century, there has been a sharp decline in confidence in sentencing principles, due to a questioning of the efficacy of punishment. It has been very difficult to develop consistent, fair, and humane criteria for evaluating legislative, judicial and correctional advancements. The Practice of Punishment offers a comprehensive study of punishment that identifies the principles of sentencing and corrections on which modern correctional systems should be built. The theory of punishment that emerges is built (...)
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  31. Jonas Prapiestis & Agnė Baranskaitė (2012). The Legal Person in the Criminal Justice of Lituania. Jurisprudence 19 (1):293-314.score: 364.5
    The article deals with the entrenchment of the institute of criminal liability of a legal person in the Lithuanian criminal law. Upon approval of the Criminal Code of the Republic of Lithuania (hereinafter also referred to as the CC) on 26 September 2000, the criminal liability of a legal person was provided almost in every fifth (at present—in every second) article of the Special Part of the CC. Although criminal liability has been increasingly applied to (...)
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  32. Joseph S. Fulda (2012). Implications of a Logical Paradox for Computer-Dispensed Justice Reconsidered: Some Key Differences Between Minds and Machines. [REVIEW] Artificial Intelligence and Law 20 (3):321-333.score: 360.0
    We argued [Since this argument appeared in other journals, I am reprising it here, almost verbatim.] (Fulda in J Law Info Sci 2:230–232, 1991/AI & Soc 8(4):357–359, 1994) that the paradox of the preface suggests a reason why machines cannot, will not, and should not be allowed to judge criminal cases. The argument merely shows that they cannot now and will not soon or easily be so allowed. The author, in fact, now believes that when—and only when—they are ready (...)
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  33. Genovaitė Dambrauskienė (2012). Workload Quotas for District Court Judges as a Precondition for Implementation of Justice. Jurisprudence 19 (3):1149-1169.score: 360.0
    The paper analyses the problem of workload quotas for district court judges in relation to the standard statutory work time duration. The problem is set against the general tendency of increase in the number of cases brought before courts each year. District courts as the courts of first instance are faced with an ever growing flow of cases. With regard to civil cases, the numbers are increasing especially in the field of the law of obligations (disputes in relation to sale, (...)
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  34. Heather Douglas (2012). Battered Women's Experiences of the Criminal Justice System: Decentring the Law. Feminist Legal Studies 20 (2):121-134.score: 360.0
    This article takes up Smart’s suggestion to examine the way the law works in practice. It explores the context of current criminal prosecutions of domestic violence offences in Queensland, Australia. This article argues that legal method is applied outside the higher courts or “judge-oriented” practice and that the obstacles inherent to legal method can be identified in the practices of police, lower court staff, magistrates and lawyers. This article suggests that it may be difficult to deconstruct legal method, even (...)
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  35. Susanne Karstedt (2007). Explorations Into the Sociology of Criminal Justice and Punishment Leaving the Modernist Project Behind. History of the Human Sciences 20 (2):51-70.score: 351.0
    Law has been a close partner to sociology from its very beginning, and the partnership often has proven to be extremely prolific for sociology. Grand theories as well as vital conceptual tools can be counted among its offspring. Both disciplines share the common ground of socio-legal studies, which has developed into a nearly independent interdisciplinary enterprise where legal scholars and sociologists happily meander between the normative and the analytical. From the vast array of topics in the field of socio-legal studies (...)
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  36. D. K. (2001). Negotiated Measures - the Institutional Micropolitics of Official Criminal Justice Statistics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (4):705-722.score: 351.0
    This paper examines some of the background social and institutional practices involved in the production of official statistics about crime and criminal justice. It documents how a host of micropolitical considerations impinge on what studies are conducted, which agencies control official data, and how measures are standardized. The communication of statistical facts is also shown to be influenced by a concern to prospectively manage the political symbolism of popular accounts about crime and criminal justice statistics.
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  37. Dragan Milovanovic (2007). Diversity, Law and Justice: A Deleuzian Semiotic View of 'Criminal Justice'. [REVIEW] International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 20 (1):55-79.score: 351.0
    This article takes a Deleuzian view toward diversity, law and justice. It makes use of the insights developed in his two books on cinema comparing an “organic regime” to a “crystalline regime.” The former will be seen as the image of thought and regime of signs of traditional criminal justice practices (due process model, crime control model, family model, actuarial justice, restorative justice); the latter, the basis of a transformative justice (social justice) and the regime of signs that are (...)
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  38. George Schedler & Matthew J. Kelly (1982). Criminal Justice and Strict Liability: The Obligation of Society to Punish Only the Guilty. American Journal of Jurisprudence 27 (1):109-113.score: 346.5
    We argue in this essay that any society that organizes itself to punish criminals should in justice consider itself strictly liable to punish only those who are guilty in fact of the crimes for which they are punished. We argue that justice, not utility, is the basis of the obligation society has not to punish the innocent and that any society that is just would bind itself by statute to compensate the innocents it punishes by mistake. We hope to have (...)
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  39. Larry Laudan (2008). The Elementary Epistemic Arithmetic of Criminal Justice. Episteme 5 (3):pp. 282-294.score: 342.0
    This paper propounds the following theses: 1). that the traditional focus on the Blackstone ratio of errors as a device for setting the criminal standard of proof is ill-conceived, 2). that the preoccupation with the rate of false convictions in criminal trials is myopic, and 3). that the key ratio of interest, in judging the political morality of a system of criminal justice, involves the relation between the risk that an innocent person runs of being falsely convicted (...)
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  40. Snieguolė Matulienė & Rolandas Krikščiūnas (2011). Issues of the Theory of Criminalistics Situations. Jurisprudence 18 (1):345-366.score: 342.0
    The word ‘situation’ is met quite often not only in everyday life but also in legal literature. It describes the interrelations among the society, officials, public administration entities, institutions, states, etc. Frequently it is a characterization of certain controversial phenomena. In criminal justice, however, this word carries a special practical and applied meaning and requires constant in-depth analysis not only of the etymology of ‘a situation’ but also of its legal theoretic meaning, purpose, function and practical application. In (...)
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  41. Gary Edmond (2002). Constructing Miscarriages of Justice: Misunderstanding Scientific Evidence in High Profile Criminal Appeals. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 22 (1):53-89.score: 333.0
    In recent decades a number of criminal convictions have been reversed on appeal, partially on the basis of problems associated with the use of scientific evidence adduced by the prosecution during the trial. These miscarriage of justice cases have received considerable attention from news media, legal commentators, criminologists and in formal public inquiries. Most responses to these cases have been critical of the scientific evidence originally relied upon at trial. Few commentators have been critical of, or even reflective about, (...)
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  42. James Edwards (2010). Justice Denied: The Criminal Law and the Ouster of the Courts. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 30 (4):725-748.score: 333.0
    The character of contemporary criminal law is changing. This article examines one aspect of that change: a type of criminal offence which, it is argued, effectively ousts the criminal courts. These ‘ouster offences’ are first distinguished from more conventional offences by virtue of their distinctive structure. The article then argues that to create an ouster offence is to oust the criminal courts by depriving them of the ability to adjudicate on whatever wrongdoing the offence-creator takes to (...)
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  43. David Lyons (1971/1993). Moral Aspects of Legal Theory: Essays on Law, Justice, and Political Responsibility. Cambridge University Press.score: 319.5
    David Lyons is one of the preeminent philosophers of law active in the United States. This volume comprises essays written over a period of twenty years in which Professor Lyons outlines his fundamental views about the nature of law and its relation to morality and justice. The underlying theme of the book is that a system of law has only a tenuous connection with morality and justice. Contrary to those legal theorists who maintain that no matter how bad the law (...)
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  44. Jesper Ryberg (2011). Racial Profiling and Criminal Justice. Journal of Ethics 15 (1/2):79 - 88.score: 319.5
    According to the main argument in favour of the practice of racial profiling as a low enforcement tactic, the use of race as a targeting factor helps the police to apprehend more criminals. In the following, this argument is challenged. It is argued that, given the assumption that criminals are currently being punished too severely in Western countries, the apprehension of more criminals may not constitute a reason in favour of racial profiling at all.
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  45. Ross Cranston (2006). How Law Works: The Machinery and Impact of Civil Justice. Oxford University Press.score: 319.5
    This book looks at the civil justice system - the courts and what they do; legal aid and other methods of providing access to justice; lawyers and their conduct; and the role of legal procedure. It also looks at the impact the civil justice system has on wider society, and its relationship with economics and commercial development. The book is largely focussed on Britain, but includes material from the USA, the Indian sub-continent, south-east Asia, and Aboriginal society in Australia.
     
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  46. Roger Wertheimer (1991). Preferring Punishment of Criminals Over Provisions for Victims. In D. Sank & D. Caplan (eds.), To Be a Victim. Plenum.score: 310.5
    Victims of crime have long been victimized by our criminal justice system. Why? And why has the movement to rectify this been so late coming?
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  47. Benjamin Goold (2004). Idealizing the Other? Western Images of the Japanese Criminal Justice System. Criminal Justice Ethics 23 (2):14-24.score: 306.0
    psychological terms, the [Japanese] system relies on positive rather than negative reinforcement, emphasizing loving acceptance in exchange for genuine repentance. An analogue of what the Japanese policeman wants the offender to feel is the tearful relief of a child when confession of wrongdoing to his parents results in a gentle laugh and a warm hug. In relation to American policemen, Japanese officers want to be known for the warmth of their care rather than the strictness of their enforcement.1 Much of (...)
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  48. D. Shaw, K. McCluskey, W. Linden & C. Goodall (2012). Reducing the Harmful Effects of Alcohol Misuse: The Ethics of Sobriety Testing in Criminal Justice. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (11):669-671.score: 301.5
    Alcohol use and abuse play a major role in both crime and negative health outcomes in Scotland. This paper provides a description and ethical and legal analyses of a novel remote alcohol monitoring scheme for offenders which seeks to reduce alcohol-related harm to both the criminal and the public. It emerges that the prospective benefits of this scheme to health and public order vastly outweigh any potential harms.
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  49. Nicola Lacey (2007). Space, Time and Function: Intersecting Principles of Responsibility Across the Terrain of Criminal Justice. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 1 (3):233-250.score: 301.5
    This paper considers the interpretive significance of the intersecting relationships between different conceptions of responsibility as they shift over space and time. The paper falls into two main sections. The first gives an account of several conceptions of responsibility: two conceptions founded in ideas of capacity; two founded in ideas of character, and one founded in the relationship between an agent and the outcome which she causes. The second main section uses this differentiated conceptual account to analyse and interpret certain (...)
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  50. Jeffrey Reiman (1987). The Marxian Critique of Criminal Justice. Criminal Justice Ethics 6 (1):30-50.score: 297.0
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