Search results for 'Criminal law Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1. F. C. Hutley & International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy (1979). Law and the Future of Society a Selection of Papers Presented to the Extraordinary World Congress of the Internat. Assoc. For Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy , Held in Sydney and Canberra, Australia, on 14-21 August, 1977. [REVIEW]
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Mikael M. International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy, Karlsson & Ólafur Páll Jónsson (1995). Law, Justice and the State Nordic Perspectives : Proceedings of the 16th World Congress of the International Association for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy , Reykjavík, 26 May-2 June, 1993. [REVIEW]
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. World Congress on Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy, Mikael M. Karlsson, Ólafur Páll Jónsson & Eyja Margrét Brynjarsdóttir (1997). Recht, Gerechtigkeit Und der Staat Studien Zu Gerechtigkeit, Demokratie, Nationalität, Nationalen Staaten Und Supranationalen Staaten Aus der Perspektive der Rechtstheorie, der Sozialphilosophie Und der Sozialwissenschaften = Law, Justice, and the State : Studies in Justice, Democracy, Nationality, National States, and Supra-National States From the Standpoints of Legal Theory, Social Philosophy, and Social Science. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Wesley Cragg & International Society for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy (1992). Retributivism and its Critics Canadian Section of the International Society for Philosophy of Law and Social Philosophy : Papers of the Special Nordic Conference Held at the University of Toronto, 25-27 June 1990. [REVIEW]
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Roscoe Pound & International Congress of Philosophy (1927). The Part of Philosophy in International Law. [Longmans, Green and Co.].
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  61
    Michael S. Moore (1993). Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.
    This work provides, for the first time, a unified account of the theory of action presupposed by both British and American criminal law and its underlying morality. It defends the view that human actions are volitionally caused body movements. This theory illuminates three major problems in drafting and implementing criminal law--what the voluntary act requirement does and should require, what complex descriptions of actions prohibited by criminal codes both do and should require, and when the two actions (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   15 citations  
  7.  35
    Douglas N. Husak (2010). The Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays. Oxford University Press.
    Does criminal liability require an act? -- Motive and criminal liability -- The costs to criminal theory of supposing that intentions are irrelevant to permissibility -- Transferred intent -- The nature and justifiability of nonconsummate offenses -- Strict liability, justice, and proportionality -- The sequential principle of relative culpability -- Willful ignorance, knowledge, and the equal culpability thesis : a study of the significance of the principle of legality -- Rapes without rapists : consent and reasonable mistake (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   16 citations  
  8.  38
    Andrew Botterell (2013). Review of Douglas Husak, Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays. [REVIEW] University of Toronto Law Journal 63 (1):152-158.
    A review of Douglas Husak, Philosophy of Criminal Law: Selected Essays (Oxford University Press, 2010).
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  27
    John Gardner (2007). Offences and Defences: Selected Essays in the Philosophy of Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.
    The wrongness of rape -- Rationality and the rule of law in offences against the person -- Complicity and causality -- In defence of defences -- Justifications and reasons -- The gist of excuses -- Fletcher on offences and defences -- Provocation and pluralism -- The mark of responsibility -- The functions and justifications of criminal law and punishment -- Crime : in proportion and in perspective -- Reply to critics.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   18 citations  
  10.  54
    Antony Duff (ed.) (1998). Philosophy and the Criminal Law: Principle and Critique. Cambridge University Press.
    Five pre-eminent legal theorists tackle a range of fundamental questions on the nature of the philosophy of criminal law. Their essays explore the extent to which and the ways in which our systems of criminal law can be seen as rational and principled. The essays discuss some of the principles by which, it is often thought, a system of law should be structured, and they ask whether our own systems are genuinely principled or riven by basic contradictions, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11. John Deigh & David Dolinko (eds.) (2011). The Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of the Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.
    This is the first comprehensive handbook in the philosophy of criminal law. It contains seventeen original essays by leading thinkers in the field and covers the field's major topics including limits to criminalization, obscenity and hate speech, blackmail, the law of rape, attempts, accomplice liability, causation, responsibility, justification and excuse, duress, provocation and self-defense, insanity, punishment, the death penalty, mercy, and preventive detention and other alternatives to punishment. It will be an invaluable resource for scholars and students whose (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Douglas N. Husak (1987). Philosophy of Criminal Law. Rowman & Littlefield.
    This volume collects 17 of Douglas Husak's influential essays in criminal law theory. The essays span Husak's original and provocative contributions to the central topics in the field, including the grounds of criminal liability, relative culpability, the role of defences, and the justification of punishment. The volume includes an extended introduction by the author, drawing together the themes of his work, and exploring the goals of criminal theory.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  13.  16
    Douglas Husak (2013). The Philosophy of Criminal Law: Extending the Debates. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (2):351-365.
    Larry Alexander and Peter Westen each critically examine different topics from my recent collection of essays, The Philosophy of Criminal Law. Alexander focuses on my “Rapes Without Rapists,” “Mistake of Law and Culpability,” and “Already Punished Enough.” Westen offers a more extended commentary on my “Transferred Intent.” I briefly reply to each critic in turn and try to extend the debates in new directions.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  8
    François Tanguay-Renaud & James Stribopoulos (eds.) (2012). Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational, and International Criminal Law. Hart Publishing.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15. Lennart Nordenfelt (1992). On Crime, Punishment, and Psychiatric Care: An Introduction to Swedish Philosophy of Criminal Law and Forensic Psychiatry. Almqvist & Wiksell International.
  16.  8
    Youngjae Lee (2014). What is Philosophy of Criminal Law? Criminal Law and Philosophy 8 (3):671-685.
    Introduction: State-Centered and Individual-Centered TheoriesWhat is philosophy of criminal law? The seventeen essays in this book, as a whole, provide an excellent place to start in answering that question. Editors John Deigh and David Dolinko state that they put together this volume of “seventeen original essays by leading thinkers in the philosophy of the criminal law” in order to create “an authoritative handbook” representing “the state of current research on the major topics in the field that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  88
    Matthew Lister (2010). Review of May & Hoskins, International Criminal Law and Philosophy. [REVIEW] Concurring Opinions Blog.
    This is a review of an anthology on international criminal law edited by Larry May and Zack Hoskins.
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  17
    Larry May & Zachary Hoskins (eds.) (2010). International Criminal Law and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    International Criminal Law and Philosophy is the first anthology to bring together legal and philosophical theorists to examine the normative and conceptual foundations of international criminal law. In particular, through these essays the international group of authors addresses questions of state sovereignty; of groups, rather than individuals, as perpetrators and victims of international crimes; of international criminal law and the promotion of human rights and social justice; and of what comes after international criminal prosecutions, namely, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  5
    Douglas Husak (2009). Gardner on the Philosophy of Criminal Law. Oxford Journal of Legal Studies 29 (1):169-187.
    Offences and Defences is an outstanding collection of eleven of John Gardner's previously published papers in the philosophy of criminal law. I briefly examine his views on five central issues: his claims about basic responsibility and whether it should be construed as relational; his positions on agent neutrality; his arguments about whether moral and criminal wrongs are typically strict; his thoughts about the structure of defences, and, finally, what his account of rape reveals about the content of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20. Jonathan Schonsheck (1994). On Criminalization an Essay in the Philosophy of the Criminal Law.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  21. Jørn Jacobsen (2014). Philosophy, Theory and Criminal Law. Jurisprudence 5 (1):209-216.
    Philosophy, Theory and Criminal Law: A Review of Fran?ois Tanguay-Renaud and James Stribopoulos , Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational and International Criminal Law.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22.  9
    Matt Matravers (2011). John Gardner: Offences and Defences: Selected Essays in the Philosophy of Criminal Law. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 5 (2):231-235.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. R. A. Duff (1998). Philosophy and the Criminal Law: Principle and Critique. Cambridge University Press.
    Five pre-eminent legal theorists tackle a range of fundamental questions on the nature of the philosophy of criminal law. Their essays explore the extent to which and the ways in which our systems of criminal law can be seen as rational and principled. The essays discuss some of the principles by which, it is often thought, a system of law should be structured, and they ask whether our own systems are genuinely principled or riven by basic contradictions, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. R. A. Duff (2009). Philosophy and the Criminal Law: Principle and Critique. Cambridge University Press.
    Five pre-eminent legal theorists tackle a range of fundamental questions on the nature of the philosophy of criminal law. Their essays explore the extent to which and the ways in which our systems of criminal law can be seen as rational and principled. The essays discuss some of the principles by which, it is often thought, a system of law should be structured, and they ask whether our own systems are genuinely principled or riven by basic contradictions, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. R. A. Duff (2011). Philosophy and the Criminal Law: Principle and Critique. Cambridge University Press.
    Five pre-eminent legal theorists tackle a range of fundamental questions on the nature of the philosophy of criminal law. Their essays explore the extent to which and the ways in which our systems of criminal law can be seen as rational and principled. The essays discuss some of the principles by which, it is often thought, a system of law should be structured, and they ask whether our own systems are genuinely principled or riven by basic contradictions, (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Michael S. Moore (2010). Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law. OUP Oxford.
    What implications are there for the criminal law from the philosophy of action? Providing a unified account of the theory of action presupposed by both Anglo-American criminal law and the morality that underlies it, Moore develops a coherent theory of action in philosophy and assesses its effects on criminal law.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Michael S. Moore (2010). Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law. Oxford University Press Uk.
    In print for the first time in over ten years, Act and Crime provides a unified account of the theory of action presupposed by both Anglo-American criminal law and the morality that underlies it. The book defends the view that human actions are always volitionally caused bodily movements and nothing else. The theory is used to illuminate three major problems in the drafting and the interpretation of criminal codes: 1) what the voluntary act requirement both does and should (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Antony Duff & N. E. Simmonds (eds.) (1984). Philosophy and the Criminal Law. Steiner.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  34
    Roger A. Shiner (2009). Theorizing Criminal Law Reform. Criminal Law and Philosophy 3 (2):167-186.
    How are we to understand criminal law reform? The idea seems simple—the criminal law on the books is wrong: it should be changed. But 'wrong’ how? By what norms 'wrong’? As soon as one tries to answer those questions, the issue becomes more complex. One kind of answer is that the criminal law is substantively wrong: that is, we assume valid norms of background political morality, and we argue that doctrinally the criminal law on the books (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  30.  12
    Kimberley Brownlee (2013). Digging Up, Dismantling, and Redesigning the Criminal Law. Criminal Law and Philosophy 7 (1):169-178.
    The criminal law raises wonderfully thorny foundational questions. Some of these questions are conceptual: What is a plausible conception of crime ? What is a plausible conception of criminal law ? Some of these questions are genealogical: What are the historical and genealogical roots of the criminal law in a particular jurisdiction? Other questions are evaluative: What are the political and moral values on which a given conception of criminal law depends? What kind of rational reconstruction, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Gideon Yaffe (2010). Attempts: In the Philosophy of Action and the Criminal Law. OUP Oxford.
    Gideon Yaffe presents a ground-breaking work which demonstrates the importance of philosophy of action for the law. Many people are serving sentences not for completing crimes, but for trying to. Yaffe's clear account of what it is to try to do something promises to resolve the difficulties courts face in the adjudication of attempted crimes.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  32.  14
    Larry Alexander (2009). Crime and Culpability: A Theory of Criminal Law. Cambridge University Press.
    This book presents a comprehensive overview of what the criminal law would look like if organized around the principle that those who deserve punishment should receive punishment commensurate with, but no greater than, that which they ...
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   22 citations  
  33. Jovana Davidovic (2015). Universal Jurisdiction and International Criminal Law. In Chad Flanders & Zach Hoskins (eds.), The New Philosophy of Criminal Law. Rowman & Littlefield 113-130.
    Davidovic asks what gives the international community the authority to punish some crimes? On one prominent view some crimes (genome, torture) are so heinous that the international community, so long as its procedures are fair, is justified in prosecuting them. Another view contends that heinousness alone is not enough to justify international prosecution: what is needed is an account of why the international community, in particular, has standing to hold the perpetrators to account. Davidovic raises concerns about both of these (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Thomas A. Nadelhoffer (2011). Criminal Law, Philosophy, and Psychology : Working at the Cross-Roads. In Leslie Green & Brian Leiter (eds.), Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Law. Oxford University Press
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Mark Thornton (2010). Book Review of John Gardner’s Offences and Defences: Selected Essays in the Philosophy of Criminal Law. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 23 (1):255-262.
    This volume contains eleven previously published essays on criminal law together with a new "Reply to Critics" by the Professor of Jurisprudence at Oxford, John Gardner. The principal themes of the essays, covering offences, defences, and punishment, are summarized in this review, which also highlights areas of controversy and various lines of criticism.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Mark Thornton (2013). Book Review: Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational, and International Law, Edited by François Tanguay-Renaud & James Stribopoulos. [REVIEW] Canadian Journal of Law and Jurisprudence 26 (1):243-249.
    Professor John Gardner says on the jacket, “these essays – without exception insightful and penetrating – set a high standard for the rest of us to aspire to.” This collection of 15 essays by 16 Canadian authors originated in a conference at Osgoode Hall Law School, York University. The majority of contributors are based in southern Ontario . Two are from western Canada , two from the UK and one from the US . The essays are arranged in three parts, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Alan Norrie (2007). Historical Differentiation, Moral Judgment and the Modern Criminal Law. Criminal Law and Philosophy 1 (3):251-257.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  38.  10
    C. M. V. Clarkson (2008). Why Criminal Law? The Role of Utilitarianism: A Response to Husak. Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (2):131-135.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  38
    Alfonso Donoso M. (2010). Douglas Husak, Overcriminalization. The Limits of the Criminal Law. Criminal Law and Philosophy 4 (1):99-104.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40.  29
    Richard L. Lippke (2008). Larry Laudan, Truth, Error, and Criminal Law: An Essay in Legal Epistemology. Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (1):85-89.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  19
    C. M. V. Clarkson (2008). Why Criminal Law? The Role of Utilitarianism: A Response to Husak. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (2):131-135.
  42.  13
    Rowan Cruft (2008). Liberalism and the Changing Character of the Criminal Law: Response to Ashworth and Zedner. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (1):59-65.
  43.  16
    Arlie Loughnan (2008). R. A. Duff and Stuart Green (Eds), Defining Crimes: Essays on the Special Part of the Criminal Law. [REVIEW] Criminal Law and Philosophy 2 (3):309-312.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  11
    Erik Claes (2006). Discussion (A) Deconstruction, Criminalisation and the Criminal Law: A Reply to Pavlich's 'The Lore of Criminal Accusation'. Criminal Law and Philosophy 1 (1):99-105.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Chad Flanders & Zachary Hoskins (eds.) (2015). The New Philosophy of Criminal Law. Rowman & Littlefield International.
    This volume is a collection of twelve new essays, authored by leading philosophers and legal theorists, examining the central conceptual and normative questions underlying our institutions of criminal law.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. John Gardner (2007). Offences and Defences: Selected Essays in the Philosophy of Criminal Law. Oxford University Press Uk.
    John Gardner's writings on the theory of criminal law have had a significant impact on the way that this subject is understood by legal scholars and philosophers. This book collects together a selection of his best-known and most provocative pieces. John Gardner tackles persistent and troublesome questions about the philosophical foundations of the criminal law. Which wrongs are suitable to be crimes and why? What are the conditions of criminal responsibility, and how do they relate to the (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  38
    Stephen Shute, John Gardner & Jeremy Horder (eds.) (1993). Action and Value in Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.
    In this challenging collection of new essays, leading philosophers and criminal lawyers from the United States, the United Kingdom, and Canada break with the tradition of treating the philosophical foundations of criminal law as an adjunct to the study of punishment. Focusing clearly on the central issues of moral luck, mistake, and mental illness, this volume aims to reorient the study of criminal law. In the process of retrieving valuable material from traditional law classifications, the contributors break (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. Larry Alexander (2004). The Philosophy of Criminal Law. In Jules Coleman & Scott Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. OUP Oxford
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. Larry Alexander (2002). Philosophy of Criminal Law. In Jules Coleman & Scott J. Shapiro (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Jurisprudence and Philosophy of Law. OUP Oxford
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Gideon Yaffe (2012). Attempts: In the Philosophy of Action and the Criminal Law. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Gideon Yaffe presents a ground-breaking work which demonstrates the importance of philosophy of action for the law. Many people are serving sentences not for completing crimes, but for trying to. So the law governing attempted crimes is of practical as well as theoretical importance. Questions arising in the adjudication of attempts intersect with questions in the philosophy of action, such as what intention a person must have, if any, and what a person must do, if anything, to be (...)
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000