Search results for 'Critical thinking' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  33
    Bruce R. Reichenbach (2001). Introduction to Critical Thinking. Mcgraw Hill Higher Education.
    This text uses the educational objectives of Benjamin Bloom as six steps to critical thinking (namely: knowledge, comprehension, application, analysis, synthesis, and evaluation). The book starts with the absolute basics (for example, how to find the topic, issue, and thesis) vs. the usual "explaining and evaluating arguments" and fine distinctions that easily can lose students.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Tim Kenyon & Guillaume Beaulac (2014). Critical Thinking Education and Debiasing. Informal Logic 34 (4):341-363.
    There are empirical grounds to doubt the effectiveness of a common and intuitive approach to teaching debiasing strategies in critical thinking courses. We summarize some of the grounds before suggesting a broader taxonomy of debiasing strategies. This four-level taxonomy enables a useful diagnosis of biasing factors and situations, and illuminates more strategies for more effective bias mitigation located in the shaping of situational factors and reasoning infrastructure—sometimes called “nudges” in the literature. The question, we contend, then becomes how (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3.  16
    John Corcoran (1999). Critical thinking and pedagogical license. Manuscrito XXII, 109–116. Persian translation by Hassan Masoud. Manuscrito: Revista Internacional de Filosofía 22 (2):109-116.
    CRITICAL THINKING AND PEDAGOGICAL LICENSE https://www.academia.edu/9273154/CRITICAL_THINKING_AND_PEDAGOGICAL_LICENSE JOHN CORCORAN.1999. Critical thinking and pedagogical license. Manuscrito XXII, 109–116. Persian translation by Hassan Masoud. Please post your suggestions for corrections and alternative translations. -/- Critical thinking involves deliberate application of tests and standards to beliefs per se and to methods used to arrive at beliefs. Pedagogical license is authorization accorded to teachers permitting them to use otherwise illicit means in order to achieve pedagogical goals. Pedagogical license is (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  25
    Maralee Harrell (2012). Assessing the Efficacy of Argument Diagramming to Teach Critical Thinking Skills in Introduction to Philosophy. Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 27 (2):31-39.
    After determining one set of skills that we hoped our students were learning in the introductory philosophy class at Carnegie Mellon University, we performed an experiment twice over the course of two semesters to test whether they were actually learning these skills. In addition, there were four different lectures of this course in the first semester, and five in the second; in each semester students in some lectures were taught the material using argument diagrams as a tool to aid understanding (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5.  7
    Richard Oxenberg, Bloodthink, Doublethink, and the Duplicitous Mind: On the Need for Critical Thinking in a Just Society.
    "Crooked people deceive themselves in order to deceive others; in this way the world comes to ruin." This quote from a medieval Confucianist expresses the ethical danger of self-deception. My paper examines the psychological proclivity for self-deception and argues that it lies behind much social and interpersonal injustice. I review Hitler's Mein Kampf, as a premiere example of such cognitive duplicity, and Socratic dialectic, as an example of the cognitive hygiene necessary to combat it. I conclude that a robust educational (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  5
    Juho Ritola (2016). Deliberative Democracy, Critical Thinking, and the Deliberating Individual: Empirical Challenges to the Reasonability of the Citizen. Studier I Pædagogisk Filosofi 4 (1):29-54.
    In this essay, I first discuss the conditions set by theorists of democratic deliberation on proper deliberation. These conditions call for reasoned decisions from mutually acceptable premises. Next, I present the ideal of critical thinking that should guide the citizen in this deliberation. I then examine the empirical literature on human reasoning. Some research results in the empirical literature paint a bleak picture of human rationality: we fall victim to heuristics and biases, persevere in our beliefs (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  39
    John Corcoran (1999). Critical Thinking and Pedagogical License. Manuscrito 22 (2):109.
    Critical thinking involves deliberate application of tests and standards to beliefs per se and to methods used to arrive at beliefs. Pedagogical license is authorization accorded to teachers permitting them to use otherwise illicit means in order to achieve pedagogical goals. Pedagogical license is thus analogous to poetic license or, more generally, to artistic license. Pedagogical license will be found to be pervasive in college teaching. This presentation suggests that critical thinking courses emphasize two topics: first, (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  31
    Gert J. J. Biesta & Geert Jan J. M. Stams (2001). Critical Thinking and the Question of Critique: Some Lessons From Deconstruction. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (1):57-74.
    This article provides somephilosophical ``groundwork'' for contemporary debatesabout the status of the idea(l) of critical thinking.The major part of the article consists of a discussionof three conceptions of ``criticality,'' viz., criticaldogmatism, transcendental critique (Karl-Otto Apel),and deconstruction (Jacques Derrida). It is shown thatthese conceptions not only differ in their answer tothe question what it is ``to be critical.'' They alsoprovide different justifications for critique andhence different answers to the question what giveseach of them the ``right'' to be (...). It is arguedthat while transcendental critique is able to solvesome of the problems of the dogmatic approach tocriticality, deconstruction provides the most coherentand self-reflexive conception of critique. A crucialcharacteristic of the deconstructive style of critiqueis that this style is not motivated by the truth ofthe criterion (as in critical dogmatism) or by acertain conception of rationality (as intranscendental critique), but rather by a concern forjustice. It is suggested that this concern should becentral to any redescription of the idea(l) ofcritical thinking. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  9.  96
    Christopher Winch (2006). Education, Autonomy and Critical Thinking. Routledge.
    The concepts of autonomy and of critical thinking play a central role in many contemporary accounts of the aims of education. This book analyses their relationship to each other and to education, exploring their roles in mortality and politics before examining the role of critical thinking in fulfilling the educational aim of preparing young people for autonomy. The author analyses different senses of the terms 'autonomy' and 'critical thinking' and the implications for education. Implications (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  10.  43
    Kal Alston (2001). Re/Thinking Critical Thinking: The Seductions of Everyday Life. Studies in Philosophy and Education 20 (1):27-40.
    The way that critical thinking has been framed as aneducational objective has led, on the one hand, to itssuccessful saturation of educational discourse and, onthe other, to an equation of critical thinking withdemonstrable rhetorical skills. This essay suggeststhat both critical thinking and obstacles tosuccessful critical thinking are most commonly foundin the activities of everyday life. Humans deploycritical thinking in expressions of socialimagination, illuminations of our selves andrelationship, and in ethical choices and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  11.  3
    Guðmundur Heiðar Frímannsson (2016). Reasons and Normativity in Critical Thinking. Studier I Pædagogisk Filosofi 4 (1):3-16.
    The reasons conception is the most prominent account of the nature of critical thinking. It consists in responding appropriately to reasons. Responding to reasons can be following a rule, it can be making an exception to a rule, it can be responding to a situation that is unique. It depends on the context each time what is the appropriate response. Critical thinking is the educational cognate of rationality and is a sine qua non for a reasonable (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  70
    Marie-France Daniel & Emmanuelle Auriac (2011). Philosophy, Critical Thinking and Philosophy for Children1. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (5):415-435.
    For centuries, philosophy has been considered as an intellectual activity requiring complex cognitive skills and predispositions related to complex (or critical) thinking. The Philosophy for Children (P4C) approach aims at the development of critical thinking in pupils through philosophical dialogue. Some contest the introduction of P4C in the classroom, suggesting that the discussions it fosters are not philosophical in essence. In this text, we argue that P4C is philosophy.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  13.  21
    Tracy Bowell (2002). Critical Thinking: A Concise Guide. Routledge.
    Attempts to persuade us - to believe something, to do something, to buy something - are everywhere. What is less clear is how one is to think critically about such attempts and whether any of them are sound arguments. Critical Thinking: A Concise Guide is a much-needed guide to thinking skills and a clear introduction to thinking clearly and rationally for oneself. Accessibly written, this book equips readers with the essential skills required (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  14. Jennifer Wilson Mulnix (2010). Thinking Critically About Critical Thinking. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (5):464-479.
    As a philosophy professor, one of my central goals is to teach students to think critically. However, one difficulty with determining whether critical thinking can be taught, or even measured, is that there is widespread disagreement over what critical thinking actually is. Here, I reflect on several conceptions of critical thinking, subjecting them to critical scrutiny. I also distinguish critical thinking from other (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  11
    Jeffrey Maynes (2015). Critical Thinking and Cognitive Bias. Informal Logic 35 (2):183-203.
    Teaching critical thinking skill is a central pedagogical aim in many courses. These skills, it is hoped, will be both portable and durable. Yet, both of these virtues are challenged by pervasive and potent cognitive biases, such as motivated reasoning, false consensus bias and hindsight bias. In this paper, I argue that a focus on the development of metacognitive skill shows promise as a means to inculcate debiasing habits in students. Such habits will help students become more (...) reasoners. I close with suggestions for implementing this strategy. (shrink)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Larry Wright (2001). Critical Thinking: An Introduction to Analytical Reading and Reasoning. Oxford University Press.
    Extensively classroom-tested, Critical Thinking: An Introduction to Analytical Reading and Reasoning provides a non-technical vocabulary and analytic apparatus that guide students in identifying and articulating the central patterns found in reasoning and in expository writing more generally. Understanding these patterns of reasoning helps students to better analyze, evaluate, and construct arguments and to more easily comprehend the full range of everyday arguments found in ordinary journalism. Critical Thinking distinguishes itself from other texts in the field by (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  17. Lewis Vaughn (2008). The Power of Critical Thinking: Effective Reasoning About Ordinary and Extraordinary Claims. Oxford Univeristy Press.
    Enhanced by many innovative exercises, examples, and pedagogical features, The Power of Critical Thinking: Effective Reasoning About Ordinary and Extraordinary Claims, Second Edition, explores the essentials of critical reasoning, argumentation, logic, and argumentative essay writing while also incorporating material on important topics that most other texts leave out. Author Lewis Vaughn offers comprehensive treatments of core topics, including an introduction to claims and arguments, discussions of propositional and categorical logic, and full coverage of the basics of inductive (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18.  2
    Katariina Holma (2016). The Critical Spirit: Emotional and Moral Dimensions Critical Thinking. Studier I Pædagogisk Filosofi 4 (1):17-28.
    In this article, I will introduce and explore the critical spirit component of critical thinking and defend it as significant for the adequate conceptualization of critical thinking as an educational aim. The idea of critical spirit has been defended among others by such eminent supporters of critical thinking as John Dewey, Israel Scheffler, and Harvey Siegel but has not thus far been explored and analyzed sufficiently. I will argue that the critical (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  12
    Chi-Ming Lam (2007). Is Popper's Falsificationist Heuristic a Helpful Resource for Developing Critical Thinking? Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (4):432–448.
    Based on a rather simple thesis that we can learn from our mistakes, Karl Popper developed a falsificationist epistemology in which knowledge grows through falsifying, or criticizing, our theories. According to him, knowledge, especially scientific knowledge, progresses through conjectures that are controlled by criticism, or attempted refutations . As he puts it, ‘Criticism of our conjectures is of decisive importance: by bringing out our mistakes it makes us understand the difficulties of the problem which we are trying to solve. This (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  20.  10
    Ralph H. Johnson & Benjamin Hamby (2015). A Meta-Level Approach to the Problem of Defining ‘Critical Thinking’. Argumentation 29 (4):417-430.
    The problem of defining ‘critical thinking’ needs a fresh approach. When one takes into consideration the sheer quantity of definitions and their obvious differences, an onlooker might be tempted to conclude that there is no inherent meaning to the term: that each author seems to consider that he or she is free to offer a definition that suits them. And, with a few exceptions, there has not been much discussion among proposers about the strength and weaknesses of the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21.  28
    Kevin L. Flores, Gina S. Matkin, Mark E. Burbach, Courtney E. Quinn & Heath Harding (2012). Deficient Critical Thinking Skills Among College Graduates: Implications for Leadership. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (2):212-230.
    Although higher education understands the need to develop critical thinkers, it has not lived up to the task consistently. Students are graduating deficient in these skills, unprepared to think critically once in the workforce. Limited development of cognitive processing skills leads to less effective leaders. Various definitions of critical thinking are examined to develop a general construct to guide the discussion as critical thinking is linked to constructivism, leadership, and education. Most pedagogy is content-based built (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  11
    Robert H. Ennis (1996). Critical Thinking Dispositions: Their Nature and Assessability. Informal Logic 18 (2).
    Assuming that critical thinking dispositions are at least as important as critical thinking abilities, Ennis examines the concept of critical thinking disposition and suggests some criteria for judging sets of them. He considers a leading approach to their analysis and offers as an alternative a simpler set, including the disposition to seek alternatives and be open to them. After examining some gender-bias and subject-specificity challenges to promoting critical thinking dispositions, he notes some (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  23.  36
    Peg Tittle (2011/2010). Critical Thinking: An Appeal to Reason. Routledge.
    This book covers all the material typically addressed in first or second-year college courses in Critical Thinking: Chapter 1: Critical Thinking 1.1 What is critical thinking? 1.2 What is critical thinking not? Chapter 2: The Nature of Argument 2.1 Recognizing an Argument 2.2 Circular Arguments 2.3 Counterarguments 2.4 The Burden of Proof 2.5 Facts and Opinions 2.6 Deductive and Inductive Argument Chapter 3: The Structure of Argument 3.1 Convergent, Single 3.2 Convergent, Multiple (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  24.  15
    Juho Ritola (2012). Critical Thinking is Epistemically Responsible. Metaphilosophy 43 (5):659-678.
    Michael Huemer () argues that following the epistemic strategy of Critical Thinking—that is, thinking things through for oneself—leaves the agent epistemically either worse off or no better off than an alternative strategy of Credulity—that is, trusting the authorities. Therefore, Critical Thinking is not epistemically responsible. This article argues that Reasonable Credulity entails Critical Thinking, and since Reasonable Credulity is epistemically responsible, the Critical Thinking that it entails is epistemically responsible too.
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  25. Wanda Teays (2009). Second Thoughts: Critical Thinking for a Diverse Society. Mcgraw-Hill Higher Education.
    Part one: Acquiring critical thinking skills -- Out of the fog : the pathway to critical thinking -- Nuts and bolts : the basics of argument -- Analysis : the heart of critical thinking -- Handling claims, drawing inferences -- The logic machine : deductive and inductive reasoning -- Part two: Sharpening the tools -- The persuasive power of analogies -- Fallacies, fallacies : steering clear of argumentative quicksand (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  26.  4
    Peter A. Facione (2000). The Disposition Toward Critical Thinking: Its Character, Measurement, and Relationship to Critical Thinking Skill. Informal Logic 20 (1):61-84.
    Theorists have hypothesized that skill in critical thinking is positively correlated with the consistent internal motivation to think and that specific critical thinking skills are matched with specific critical thinking dispositions. If true, these assumptions suggest that a skill-focused curriculum would lead persons to be both willing and able to think. This essay presents a researchbased expert consensus definition of critical thinking, argues that human dispositions are neither hidden nor unknowable, describes a (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  27.  13
    Barbara Thayer-Bacon (1998). Transforming and Redescribing Critical Thinking: Constructive Thinking. [REVIEW] Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (2/3):123-148.
    The author describes a published symposium which debated Is Critical Thinking Biased? The symposium meant to address concerns about critical thinking that are being expressed by feminist and postmodern scholars. However, through the author's critique, and the symposium respondent's, we learn the participants ended up begging the question of bias. The author maintains that the belief that critical thinking is unbiased is based on an assumption that knowers can (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  28. Gregory Bassham (ed.) (2008). Critical Thinking: A Student's Introduction. Mcgraw-Hill.
    This clear, learner-friendly text helps today's students bridge the gap between everyday culture and critical thinking. The text covers all the basics of critical thinking, beginning where students are, not where we think they should be. Its comprehensiveness allows instructors to tailor the material to their individual teaching styles, resulting in an exceptionally versatile text.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  31
    Anand Jayprakash Vaidya (2013). Epistemic Responsibility and Critical Thinking. Metaphilosophy 44 (4):533-556.
    Should we always engage in critical thinking about issues of public policy, such as health care, gun control, and LGBT rights? Michael Huemer (2005) has argued for the claim that in some cases it is not epistemically responsible to engage in critical thinking on these issues. His argument is based on a reliabilist conception of the value of critical thinking. This article analyzes Huemer's argument against the epistemic responsibility of critical thinking by (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  6
    Sharon Bailin (1999). The Problem With Percy: Epistemology, Understanding and Critical Thinking. Informal Logic 19 (2).
    Most current conceptions of critical thinking conceive of critical thinking in terms of abilities and dispositions. In this paper I describe a common type of problem students experience with critical thinking and argue that conceptualizations in terms of abilities and dispositions do not provide a way to understand this problem. I argue, further, that a useful way to think about the problem is in terms of epistemological understanding, and that this way of thinking (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  31.  25
    Paul Thagard (2011). Critical Thinking and Informal Logic: Neuropsychological Perspectives. Informal Logic 31 (3):152-170.
    This article challenges the common view that improvements in critical thinking are best pursued by investigations in informal logic. From the perspective of research in psychology and neuroscience, hu-man inference is a process that is multimodal, parallel, and often emo-tional, which makes it unlike the linguistic, serial, and narrowly cog-nitive structure of arguments. At-tempts to improve inferential prac-tice need to consider psychological error tendencies, which are patterns of thinking that are natural for peo-ple but frequently lead to (...)
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  20
    Donald L. Hatcher (1999). Why Formal Logic is Essential for Critical Thinking. Informal Logic 19 (1).
    After critiquing the arguments against using formal logic to teach critical thinking, this paper argues that for theoretical, practical, and empirical reasons, instruction in the fundamentals of formal logic is essential for critical thinking, and so should be included in every class that purports to teach critical thinking.
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  14
    Mark Mason (2007). Critical Thinking and Learning. Educational Philosophy and Theory 39 (4):339–349.
    This paper introduces some of the debates in the field of critical thinking by highlighting differences among thinkers such as Siegel, Ennis, Paul, McPeck, and Martin, and poses some questions that arise from these debates. Does rationality transcend particular cultures, or are there different kinds of thinking, different styles of reasoning? What is the relationship between critical thinking and learning? In what ways does the moral domain overlap with these largely epistemic and pedagogical issues? The (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  34.  40
    Suzanne R. Kirschner (2011). Critical Thinking and the End(s) of Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 31 (3):173-183.
    Critical thinking always involves logical and metacognitive skills. However, different modes of thinking critically with regard to psychology evince diverse sensibilities, that is, different ways of envisioning what might be wrong with a project or approach and how it could be improved. Fostering critical thinking thus is about developing distinctive modes of responsiveness and discernment, of which there can be more than one type. Literature on critical thinking for psychologists can be parsed into (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. Hugh Mercer Curtler (2004). Ethical Argument: Critical Thinking in Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Designed to immediately engage students and other readers in philosophical reflection, the new edition of Ethical Argument: Critical Thinking in Ethics bridges the gap between ethical theory and practice. This brief introduction combines a discussion of ethical theory with fundamental elements of critical thinking--including informal fallacies and the basics of logic--and uses case studies and practical applications to illustrate concepts. Author Hugh Mercer Curtler presents a carefully formulated critique of ethical relativism, encouraging students to reason along (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  12
    Richard W. Paul (1989). Critical Thinking in North America: A New Theory of Knowledge, Learning, and Literacy. [REVIEW] Argumentation 3 (2):197-235.
    The pace of change in the world is accelerating, yet educational institutions have not kept pace. Indeed, schools have historically been the most static of social institutions, uncritically passing down from generation to generation outmoded didactic, lecture-and-drill-based, models of instruction. Predictable results follow. Students, on the whole, do not learn how to work by, or think for, themselves. They do not learn how to gather, analyze, synthesize and assess information. They do not learn how to analyze the diverse logic of (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  13
    Michelle Ciurria (2012). Critical Thinking in Moral Argumentation Contexts: A Virtue Ethical Approach. Informal Logic 32 (2):242-258.
    In traditional analytic philosophy, critical thinking is defined along Cartesian lines as rational and linear reasoning preclusive of intuitions, emotions and lived experience. According to Michael Gilbert, this view – which he calls the Natural Light Theory (NLT) – fails because it arbitrarily excludes standard feminist forms of argumentation and neglects the essentially social nature of argumentation. In this paper, I argue that while Gilbert’s criticism is correct for argumentation in general, NLT fails in a distinctive and particularly (...)
    Direct download (15 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  12
    Jonathan E. Adler (1991). Critical Thinking, A Deflated Defense: A Critical Study of John E. McPeck's Teaching Critical Thinking: Dialogue and Dialectic. Informal Logic 13 (2).
    A critical study of McPeck's recent book, in which he strengthens and develops his arguments against teaching critical thinking (CT). Accepting McPeck's basic claim that there is no unitary skill of reasoning or thinking, I argue that his strictures on CT courses or programs do not follow. I set out what I consider the proper justification that programs in CT have to meet, and argue both that McPeck demands much more than is (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39.  6
    Harvey Siegel (1993). Not by Skill Alone: The Centrality of Character to Critical Thinking. Informal Logic 15 (3).
    Connie Missimer (1990) challenges what she calls the Character View, according to which critical thinking involves both skill and character, and argues for a rival conception-the Skill View-according to which critical thinking is a matter of skill alone. In this paper I criticize the Skill View and defend the Character View from Missimer's critical arguments.
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  8
    Don S. Levi (1992). The Limits of Critical Thinking. Informal Logic 14 (2).
    This paper examines Robert Fogelin's suggestion that there may be deep disagreements, where no argument can address what is at issue. A number of possible bases for Fogelin's position are considered and rejected: people sometimes do not have enough in common for reasons to count as reasons; doubt is possible only against the background of framework propositions; key premises may be inarguable; argument must occur within a conceptual framework. The paper concludes by reflecting on why it is important to have (...)
    Direct download (12 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41.  7
    Donald L. Hatcher (1999). Why Critical Thinking Should Be Combined With Written Composition. Informal Logic 19 (2).
    This paper provides evidence and arguments that, given the choice of teaching critical thinking and written composition as separate, stand-alone courses or combining them, the two should be combined into an integrated sequence.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  7
    Ian Wright (2001). Critical Thinking in the Schools: Why Doesn't Much Happen? Informal Logic 22 (2).
    The teaching of critical thinking in public schooling is a central aim. Yet, despite its widespread acceptance in curriculum documents, critical thinking is rarely taught. Motivated by Onosko (1991), and by the efforts of some post-secondary instructors of critical thinking to get critical thinking taught in schools, I look at the recent literature on (a) critical thinking in the social studies, (b) definitions of, and programs in critical thinking, (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  23
    Kenny Siu Sing Huen (2011). Critical Thinking as a Normative Practice in Life: A Wittgensteinian Groundwork. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (10):1065-1087.
    On the point that, in practices of critical thinking, we respond spontaneously in concrete situations, this paper presents an account on behalf of Wittgenstein. I argue that the ‘seeing-things-aright’ model of Luntley's Wittgenstein is not adequate, since it pays insufficient attention to radically new circumstances, in which the content of norms is updated. While endorsing Bailin's emphasis on criteria of critical thinking, Wittgenstein would agree with Papastephanou and Angeli's demand to look behind criteriology. He maintains the (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44.  6
    Blanka Šulavíková (2011). Philosophical Dialogue as a Space for Seeking a Good Life, Identity and Critical Thinking. Human Affairs 21 (2):157-162.
    In recent years we have witnessed growth in the practical application of philosophy. Some authors talk about a so-called “shift in philosophical counselling” or “philosophical practice” taking place chiefly in western countries. Some Slovak authors also discuss the application of philosophy in practice but this issue is only in its infancy here. The author of this paper seeks to establish the boundaries of understanding the possibilities philosophy has to offer in practical life and to formulate an opinion on the competency (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45.  5
    Henrik Bohlin (2009). Perspective-Dependence and Critical Thinking. Argumentation 23 (2):189-203.
    Recent theories of critical thinking have stressed the importance of taking into consideration in critical enquiry the perspectives, or presuppositions, of both the speaker whose statements are under scrutiny and the critic himself. The purpose of the paper is to explore this idea from an epistemological (rather than a pedagogical or psychological) point of view. The problem is first placed within the general context of critical thinking theory. Three types of perspective-dependence are then described, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46.  5
    John Hoaglund (1993). Critical Thinking: A Socratic Model. [REVIEW] Argumentation 7 (3):291-311.
    A concept of critical thinking is developed based on the Socratic method and called accordingly a Socratic model. First the features of critical thinking stressed in this model are stated and illustrated. The Socratic method is presented and interpreted, then taken to yield a model of critical thinking. The process of internalization by which the Socratic model helps us to become critical thinkers is described. Argument analysis is considered as a widely used instructional (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  14
    Thomas Teo (2011). Radical Philosophical Critique and Critical Thinking in Psychology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 31 (3):193-199.
    Introducing the concept of tradition and its importance for critical-intellectual development, traditions of radical philosophy and psychology are presented. Emphasizing the role of Marxist and post-Marxist thought in various critical approaches, critical programs are presented as theoretical endeavors that share the critique of ideology. These approaches examine knowledge production and knowledge biases in the sciences and psychology from the perspective of social categories or in terms of power. It is suggested that critical thinking in psychology (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  6
    David Hitchcock (2004). The Effectiveness of Computer Assisted Instruction in Critical Thinking. Informal Logic 24 (3):183-217.
    278 non-freshman university students taking a l2-week critical thinking course in a large single-section class, with computer-assisted guided practice as a replacement for small-group discussion, and all testing in machine-scored multiple-choice format, improved their critical thinking skills, as measured by the California Critical Thinking Skills Test (Forms A and B), by half a standard deviation, a moderate improvement. The improvement was more than that reported with a traditional format without computer-assisted instruction, but less than (...)
    Direct download (16 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49.  12
    Frank C. Richardson & Brent D. Slife (2011). Critical Thinking in Social and Psychological Inquiry. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 31 (3):165-172.
    Yanchar, Slife, and their colleagues have described how mainstream psychology's notion of critical thinking has largely been conceived of as “scientific analytic reasoning” or “method-centered critical thinking.” We extend here their analysis and critique, arguing that some version of the one-sided instrumentalism and confusion about tacit values that characterize scientistic approaches to inquiry also color phenomenological, critical theoretical, and social constructionist viewpoints. We suggest that hermeneutic/dialogical conceptions of inquiry, including the idea of social theory as (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  6
    Donald L. Hatcher (1994). Critical Thinking, Postmodernism, and Rational Evaluation. Informal Logic 16 (3).
    In this paper, after showing how the postmodern critiques of Enlightenment rationality apply to critical thinking, I argue that a critical discussion on any subject must assume specific principles of rationality. I then show how these principles can be used to critique and reject postmodern claims about the contextual nature of rationality.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000