Search results for 'Criticism of Mathematical Natural Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eric Schliesser, Spinoza and the Philosophy of Science: Mathematics, Motion, and Being.score: 1327.0
    This chapter argues that the standard conception of Spinoza as a fellow-travelling mechanical philosopher and proto-scientific naturalist is misleading. It argues, first, that Spinoza’s account of the proper method for the study of nature presented in the Theological-Political Treatise (TTP) points away from the one commonly associated with the mechanical philosophy. Moreover, throughout his works Spinoza’s views on the very possibility of knowledge of nature are decidedly sceptical (as specified below). Third, in the seventeenth-century debates over proper methods in (...)
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  2. Ian G. Stewart (2004). The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (3):665-667.score: 1032.0
  3. A. A. H. Hamilton (1998). The Books of Nature and Scripture. Recent Essays on Natural Philosophy, Theology, and Biblical Criticism in the Netherlands of Spinoza's Time and the British Isles of Newton's Time. Heythrop Journal. A Quarterly Review of Philosophy and Theology 39:206-207.score: 1032.0
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  4. Isaac Newton (2007). Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. In Aloysius Martinich, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Early Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub..score: 996.0
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  5. K. P. F. (1964). The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 18 (1):181-181.score: 996.0
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  6. Alessandro Bertinetto (2004). The Criticism of Fichte in Natural Philosophy in the Years of Education as the University of Berlin (1810-1814). Filosofia 55 (1):1-32.score: 984.0
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  7. I. Bernard Cohen (1999). The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy.score: 984.0
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  8. J. J. MacMahon (1965). The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. Philosophical Studies 14:264-265.score: 984.0
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  9. Helen Sullivan (1952). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Natural and Mathematical Sciences. New York, Vantage Press.score: 984.0
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  10. Michael Barber (2006). Philosophy and Reflection: A Critique of Frank Welz's Sociological and “Processual” Criticism of Husserl and Schutz. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):141 - 157.score: 976.8
    Frank Welz’s Kritik der Lebenswelt undertakes a sociology of knowledge criticism of the work of Edmund Husserl and Alfred Schutz that construes them as developing absolutist, egological systems opposed to the “processual” worldview prominent since the modern rise of natural science. Welz, though, misunderstands the work of Schutz and Husserl and neglects how their focus on consciousness and eidetic features pertains to the kind of reflection that one must undertake if one would avoid succumbing to absolutism, that uncovers (...)
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  11. Edward A. Maziarz (1953). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Natural and Mathematical Sciences. New Scholasticism 27 (3):347-349.score: 960.0
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  12. Edward Grant (2007). A History of Natural Philosophy: From the Ancient World to the Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press.score: 760.8
    Natural philosophy encompassed all natural phenomena of the physical world. It sought to discover the physical causes of all natural effects and was little concerned with mathematics. By contrast, the exact mathematical sciences were narrowly confined to various computations that did not involve physical causes, functioning totally independently of natural philosophy. Although this began slowly to change in the late Middle Ages, a much more thoroughgoing union of natural philosophy and mathematics (...)
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  13. Sarah Powrie (2013). The Importance of Fourteenth-Century Natural Philosophy for Nicholas of Cusa's Infinite Universe. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):33-53.score: 760.8
    This paper argues that Nicholas of Cusa’s investigation of infinity and incommensurability in De docta ignorantia was shaped by the mathematical innovations and thought experiments of fourteenth-century natural philosophy. Cusanus scholarship has overlooked this influence, in part because Raymond Klibansky’s influential edition of De docta ignorantia situated Cusa within the medieval Platonic tradition. However, Cusa departs from this tradition in a number of ways. His willingness to engage incommensurability and to compare different magnitudes of infinity distinguishes him (...)
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  14. Denis Fisette (2010). Descriptive Psychology and Natural Sciences: Husserl’s Early Criticism of Brentano. In C. Iena (ed.), Edmund Husserl 150 Years: Philosophy, Phenomenology, Sciences. Springer. 221--253.score: 720.0
    In defining his phenomenology as descriptive psychology in the introduction to the first edition of his Logical Investigations 1, Husserl suggests that the field study of his phenomenology as his methodology are very close to that of Brentano’s psychology, and that the research in the book somehow contributes to Brentano’s philosophical program, one of whose main axes is psychology or philosophy of mind.
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  15. F. Töpfer & U. Wiesing (2005). The Medical Theory of Richard Koch II: Natural Philosophy and History. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):323-334.score: 685.8
    Richard Koch1 became known in the 1920s with works on basic medical theory. Among these publications, the character of medical action and its status within the theory of science was presented as the most important theme. While science is inherently driven by the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake, medicine pursues the practical purpose of helping the sick. Therefore, medicine must be seen as an active relationship between a helping and a suffering person. While elucidating this relationship, Koch discusses (...)
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  16. N. Maxwell (2012). In Praise of Natural Philosophy: A Revolution for Thought and Life. Philosophia 40 (4):705-715.score: 676.8
    Modern science began as natural philosophy. In the time of Newton, what we call science and philosophy today – the disparate endeavours – formed one mutually interacting, integrated endeavour of natural philosophy: to improve our knowledge and understanding of the universe, and to improve our understanding of ourselves as a part of it. Profound, indeed unprecedented discoveries were made. But then natural philosophy died. It split into science on the one hand, and (...) on the other. This happened during the 18th and 19th centuries, and the split is now built into our intellectual landscape. But the two fragments, science and philosophy, are defective shadows of the glorious unified endeavour of natural philosophy. Rigour, sheer intellectual good sense and decisive argument demand that we put the two together again, and rediscover the immense merits of the integrated enterprise of natural philosophy. This requires an intellectual revolution, with dramatic implications for how we understand our world, how we understand and do science, and how we understand and do philosophy. There are dramatic implications, too, for education, and for the entire academic endeavour, and its capacity to help us discover how to tackle more successfully our immense global problems. (shrink)
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  17. Roman Murawski (2010). Philosophy of Mathematics in the Warsaw Mathematical School. Axiomathes 20 (2-3):279-293.score: 662.4
    The aim of this paper is to present and discuss the philosophical views concerning mathematics of the founders of the so called Warsaw Mathematical School, i.e., Wacław Sierpiński, Zygmunt Janiszewski and Stefan Mazurkiewicz. Their interest in the philosophy of mathematics and their philosophical papers will be considered. We shall try to answer the question whether their philosophical views influenced their proper mathematical investigations. Their views towards set theory and its rôle in mathematics will be emphasized.
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  18. V. O. Lobovikov (1999). Mathematical Jurisprudence and Mathematical Ethics: A Mathematical Simulation of the Evaluative and the Normative Attitudes to the Rigoristic Sub-Systems of the Positive Law and of the Natural-Law-and-Morals. The Urals State University Press.score: 660.0
     
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  19. Jordi Cat (2012). Into the 'Regions of Physical and Metaphysical Chaos': Maxwell's Scientific Metaphysics and Natural Philosophy of Action (Agency, Determinacy and Necessity From Theology, Moral Philosophy and History to Mathematics, Theory and Experiment). Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 43 (1):91-104.score: 650.0
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  20. C. Smeenk (2005). David B. Malament, Editor, Reading Natural Philosophy: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics, Open Court, Chicago and La Salle, IL (2002) ISBN 0-8126-9506-2 (Pp. 424 US $ 42.95, Hardcover). [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 36 (1):194-199.score: 650.0
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  21. Ae Miller & Mg Miller (1994). Central Themes of Kant's Philosophy of Science: Metaphysics and Mathematics as the a Priori Basis for Natural Science. Boston Studies in the Philosophy of Science 159:10-16.score: 650.0
  22. Imre Lakatos (1976). Proofs and Refutations: The Logic of Mathematical Discovery. Cambridge University Press.score: 648.2
    Proofs and Refutations is essential reading for all those interested in the methodology, the philosophy and the history of mathematics. Much of the book takes the form of a discussion between a teacher and his students. They propose various solutions to some mathematical problems and investigate the strengths and weaknesses of these solutions. Their discussion (which mirrors certain real developments in the history of mathematics) raises some philosophical problems and some problems about the nature of mathematical discovery (...)
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  23. Hermann Weyl (1949). Philosophy of Mathematics and Natural Science. Princeton University Press.score: 642.0
    This is a book that no one but Weyl could have written--and, indeed, no one has written anything quite like it since.
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  24. Aspasia S. Moue, Kyriakos A. Masavetas & Haido Karayianni (2006). Tracing the Development of Thought Experiments in the Philosophy of Natural Sciences. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 37 (1):61 - 75.score: 639.0
    An overview is provided of how the concept of the thought experiment has developed and changed for the natural sciences in the course of the 20th century. First, we discuss the existing definitions of the term 'thought experiment' and the origin of the thought experimentation method, identifying it in Greek Presocratics epoch. Second, only in the end of the 19th century showed up the first systematic enquiry on thought experiments by Ernst Mach's work. After the Mach's work, a negative (...)
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  25. Angus Fletcher (2011). Evolving Hamlet: Seventeenth-Century English Tragedy and the Ethics of Natural Selection. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 624.0
  26. L. J. Russell (1938). The Intelligent Individual and Society. By P. W. Bridgman, Hollis Professor of Mathematics and Natural Philosophy in Harvard University. (New York and London: The Macmillan Company. 1938. Pp. Vi + 305. Price 10s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 13 (52):496-.score: 620.0
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  27. David B. Malament (ed.) (2002). Reading Natural Philosophy: Essays in the History and Philosophy of Science and Mathematics. Open Court.score: 620.0
    In this book, 13 leading philosophers of science focus on the work of Professor Howard Stein, best known for his study of the intimate connection between ...
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  28. 熊 辉 (2013). 数学与科学、自然哲学的关系及其演变
    Evolvement of the Relation Between Mathematics, Science and Natural Philosophy.
    Advances in Philosophy 2 (3):21-25.
    score: 620.0
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  29. James W. Garrison (1987). Newton and the Relation of Mathematics to Natural Philosophy. Journal of the History of Ideas 48 (4):609-627.score: 620.0
     
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  30. M. J. Nye, J. L. Richards, R. H. Stuewer & C. Smith (1995). The Invention of Physical Science. Intersections of Mathematics, Theology and Natural Philosophy Since the Seventeenth Century. Essays in Honor of Erwin N. Hiebert. [REVIEW] Annals of Science 52 (2):209-210.score: 620.0
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  31. Crosbie Smith (1995). The Invention Of Physical Science-Intersections Of Mathematics, Theology And Natural-Philosophy Since The 17th-Century-Essays In Honor Of Hiebert, Erwin, N.-Nye, MJ, Richards, JL, Stuewer, RH. Annals of Science 52 (2):209-211.score: 620.0
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  32. Patricia Fara (2000). Niccolò Guicciardini Reading the Principia: The Debate on Newton's Mathematical Methods for Natural Philosophy From 1687 to 1736. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (4):935-939.score: 612.0
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  33. José Ferreirós (2009). C.K. Raju. Cultural Foundations of Mathematics: The Nature of Mathematical Proof and the Transmission of the Calculus From India to Europe in the 16th C. Ce. History of Science, Philosophy and Culture in Indian Civilization. [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 17 (3):nkn028.score: 610.0
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  34. Sister Helen Sullivan (1950). Review of H. Weyl, Philosophy of Mathematics and Natural Science. [REVIEW] New Scholasticism 24 (3):342-344.score: 610.0
  35. P. Harman (1987). Mathematics and Reality in Maxwell's Dynamical Physics: The Natural Philosophy of James Clerk Maxwell. In P. Achinstein & R. Kagon (eds.), Kelvin's Baltimore Lectures and Modern Theoretical Physics. Mit Press. 267--297.score: 610.0
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  36. Thomas A. O'Keefe (1951). Empiricism and Applied Mathematics in the Natural Philosophy of Whitehead. The Modern Schoolman 28 (4):267-289.score: 610.0
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  37. Heinrich Scholz (1950). Review: Hermann Weyl, Olaf Helmer, Philosophy of Mathematics and Natural Science. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 15 (3):206-208.score: 608.0
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  38. James E. McClellan (1966). B. F. Skinner's Philosophy of Human Nature: A Sympathetic Criticism. Studies in Philosophy and Education 4 (3):307-332.score: 608.0
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  39. Christopher Pincock (2009). Towards a Philosophy of Applied Mathematics. In Otávio Bueno & Øystein Linnebo (eds.), New Waves in Philosophy of Mathematics. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 603.2
    Most contemporary philosophy of mathematics focuses on a small segment of mathematics, mainly the natural numbers and foundational disciplines like set theory. While there are good reasons for this approach, in this paper I will examine the philosophical problems associated with the area of mathematics known as applied mathematics. Here mathematicians pursue mathematical theories that are closely connected to the use of mathematics in the sciences and engineering. This area of mathematics seems to proceed using different methods (...)
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  40. Lloyd P. Gerson (1990/1994). God and Greek Philosophy: Studies in the Early History of Natural Theology. Routledge.score: 603.0
    THE PRE-SOCRATIC ORIGINS OF NATURAL THEOLOGY § INTRODUCTION St Augustine informs us that pagan philosophers divided theology into three parts: () civic ...
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  41. Alfred A. Vichutinsky (2008). Of a Real Philosophy and the Natural Sciences Free of the Paranoia. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 41:47-55.score: 599.6
    The bases of tenets of the World came from the East; Pythagoras learnt all there up the 26 years. At a home, the east ideas where took in no; then he bound the mathematics with the elements of matter. This was the best way to a blood feud of the all Humanity. The 17th age gave the bases of mathematics and the Greek atomism; this had led to the paranoia in all sciences. The LCE was brought in 19th age with (...)
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  42. Miguel Espinoza (1987). Order and Organism: Steps to a Whitehedian Philosophy of Mathematics and the Natural Sciences. Theoria 3 (1):608-610.score: 598.0
  43. Angus Kerr-Lawson (1987). Order and Organism: Steps to a Whiteheadean Philosophy of Mathematics and the Natural Sciences Maurice Code Albany, NY: State University of New York Press, 1985. Pp. X, 265. $39.50, $14.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 26 (03):576-.score: 598.0
  44. Joan B. Quick (1950). Philosophy of Mathematics and Natural Science. Thought 25 (2):374-375.score: 598.0
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  45. Murray Code (1985). Order and Organism: Steps Toward a Whiteheadian Philosophy of Mathematics and the Natural Sciences. State University of New York Press.score: 598.0
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  46. Brian Coffey (1950). Philosophy of Mathematics and Natural Science. The Modern Schoolman 27 (3):232-233.score: 598.0
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  47. Stanley Shostak (2013). Philosophy of Mathematics and Natural Science. The European Legacy 18 (6):799 - null.score: 598.0
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  48. Sister Helen Sullivan (1950). Philosophy of Mathematics and Natural Science. New Scholasticism 24 (3):342-344.score: 598.0
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  49. Carlo Cellucci (1996). Mathematical Logic: What has It Done for the Philosophy of Mathematics? In Piergiorgio Odifreddi (ed.), Kreiseliana. About and Around Georg Kreisel, pp. 365-388. A K Peters.score: 597.6
    onl y to discuss some claims concerning the relationship between mathematical logic and the philosophy of mathematics that repeatedly occur in his writings. Although I do not know to what extent they are representative of his present position, they correspond to widespread views of the logical community and so seem worth discussing anyhow. Such claims will be used as reference to make some remarks about the present state of relations between mathematical logic and the philosophy of (...)
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  50. Leon Horsten, Philosophy of Mathematics. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 592.8
    If mathematics is regarded as a science, then the philosophy of mathematics can be regarded as a branch of the philosophy of science, next to disciplines such as the philosophy of physics and the philosophy of biology. However, because of its subject matter, the philosophy of mathematics occupies a special place in the philosophy of science. Whereas the natural sciences investigate entities that are located in space and time, it is not at all (...)
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