Search results for 'Criticism of Mathematical Natural Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Eric Schliesser, Spinoza and the Philosophy of Science: Mathematics, Motion, and Being.score: 231.4
    This chapter argues that the standard conception of Spinoza as a fellow-travelling mechanical philosopher and proto-scientific naturalist is misleading. It argues, first, that Spinoza’s account of the proper method for the study of nature presented in the Theological-Political Treatise (TTP) points away from the one commonly associated with the mechanical philosophy. Moreover, throughout his works Spinoza’s views on the very possibility of knowledge of nature are decidedly sceptical (as specified below). Third, in the seventeenth-century debates over proper methods in (...)
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  2. Michael Barber (2006). Philosophy and Reflection: A Critique of Frank Welz's Sociological and “Processual” Criticism of Husserl and Schutz. [REVIEW] Human Studies 29 (2):141 - 157.score: 187.8
    Frank Welz’s Kritik der Lebenswelt undertakes a sociology of knowledge criticism of the work of Edmund Husserl and Alfred Schutz that construes them as developing absolutist, egological systems opposed to the “processual” worldview prominent since the modern rise of natural science. Welz, though, misunderstands the work of Schutz and Husserl and neglects how their focus on consciousness and eidetic features pertains to the kind of reflection that one must undertake if one would avoid succumbing to absolutism, that uncovers (...)
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  3. F. Töpfer & U. Wiesing (2005). The Medical Theory of Richard Koch II: Natural Philosophy and History. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (3):323-334.score: 172.2
    Richard Koch1 became known in the 1920s with works on basic medical theory. Among these publications, the character of medical action and its status within the theory of science was presented as the most important theme. While science is inherently driven by the pursuit of knowledge for its own sake, medicine pursues the practical purpose of helping the sick. Therefore, medicine must be seen as an active relationship between a helping and a suffering person. While elucidating this relationship, Koch discusses (...)
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  4. N. Maxwell (2012). In Praise of Natural Philosophy: A Revolution for Thought and Life. Philosophia 40 (4):705-715.score: 169.2
    Modern science began as natural philosophy. In the time of Newton, what we call science and philosophy today – the disparate endeavours – formed one mutually interacting, integrated endeavour of natural philosophy: to improve our knowledge and understanding of the universe, and to improve our understanding of ourselves as a part of it. Profound, indeed unprecedented discoveries were made. But then natural philosophy died. It split into science on the one hand, and (...) on the other. This happened during the 18th and 19th centuries, and the split is now built into our intellectual landscape. But the two fragments, science and philosophy, are defective shadows of the glorious unified endeavour of natural philosophy. Rigour, sheer intellectual good sense and decisive argument demand that we put the two together again, and rediscover the immense merits of the integrated enterprise of natural philosophy. This requires an intellectual revolution, with dramatic implications for how we understand our world, how we understand and do science, and how we understand and do philosophy. There are dramatic implications, too, for education, and for the entire academic endeavour, and its capacity to help us discover how to tackle more successfully our immense global problems. (shrink)
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  5. Roman Murawski (2010). Philosophy of Mathematics in the Warsaw Mathematical School. Axiomathes 20 (2-3):279-293.score: 166.0
    The aim of this paper is to present and discuss the philosophical views concerning mathematics of the founders of the so called Warsaw Mathematical School, i.e., Wacław Sierpiński, Zygmunt Janiszewski and Stefan Mazurkiewicz. Their interest in the philosophy of mathematics and their philosophical papers will be considered. We shall try to answer the question whether their philosophical views influenced their proper mathematical investigations. Their views towards set theory and its rôle in mathematics will be emphasized.
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  6. Ian G. Stewart (2004). The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 35 (3):665-667.score: 159.6
  7. A. A. H. Hamilton (1998). The Books of Nature and Scripture. Recent Essays on Natural Philosophy, Theology, and Biblical Criticism in the Netherlands of Spinoza's Time and the British Isles of Newton's Time. Heythrop Journal. A Quarterly Review of Philosophy and Theology 39:206-207.score: 159.6
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  8. Aspasia S. Moue, Kyriakos A. Masavetas & Haido Karayianni (2006). Tracing the Development of Thought Experiments in the Philosophy of Natural Sciences. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 37 (1):61 - 75.score: 159.0
    An overview is provided of how the concept of the thought experiment has developed and changed for the natural sciences in the course of the 20th century. First, we discuss the existing definitions of the term 'thought experiment' and the origin of the thought experimentation method, identifying it in Greek Presocratics epoch. Second, only in the end of the 19th century showed up the first systematic enquiry on thought experiments by Ernst Mach's work. After the Mach's work, a negative (...)
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  9. Isaac Newton (2007). Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. In Aloysius Martinich, Fritz Allhoff & Anand Vaidya (eds.), Early Modern Philosophy: Essential Readings with Commentary. Blackwell Pub..score: 150.6
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  10. K. P. F. (1964). The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. Review of Metaphysics 18 (1):181-181.score: 150.6
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  11. Helen Sullivan (1952). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Natural and Mathematical Sciences. New York, Vantage Press.score: 150.0
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  12. Alessandro Bertinetto (2004). The Criticism of Fichte in Natural Philosophy in the Years of Education as the University of Berlin (1810-1814). Filosofia 55 (1):1-32.score: 147.6
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  13. I. Bernard Cohen (1999). The Principia: Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy.score: 147.6
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  14. J. J. MacMahon (1965). The Mathematical Principles of Natural Philosophy. Philosophical Studies 14:264-265.score: 147.6
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  15. Lloyd P. Gerson (1990/1994). God and Greek Philosophy: Studies in the Early History of Natural Theology. Routledge.score: 147.0
    THE PRE-SOCRATIC ORIGINS OF NATURAL THEOLOGY § INTRODUCTION St Augustine informs us that pagan philosophers divided theology into three parts: () civic ...
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  16. Carlo Cellucci (1996). Mathematical Logic: What has It Done for the Philosophy of Mathematics? In Piergiorgio Odifreddi (ed.), Kreiseliana. About and Around Georg Kreisel, pp. 365-388. A K Peters.score: 144.4
    onl y to discuss some claims concerning the relationship between mathematical logic and the philosophy of mathematics that repeatedly occur in his writings. Although I do not know to what extent they are representative of his present position, they correspond to widespread views of the logical community and so seem worth discussing anyhow. Such claims will be used as reference to make some remarks about the present state of relations between mathematical logic and the philosophy of (...)
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  17. Edward A. Maziarz (1953). An Introduction to the Philosophy of Natural and Mathematical Sciences. New Scholasticism 27 (3):347-349.score: 144.0
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  18. Daniel E. Shannon (2013). Hegel's Philosophy of Nature of 1805-6; Its Relation to the Phenomenology of Spirit. Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 9 (1):101-132.score: 140.2
    800x600 Hegel’s Phenomenology of Spirit (1807) was supposed to be the introduction and first part of the Jena System III, and as such it was to introduce us to the other parts of the project. Most commentators on Hegel’s Phenomenology , however, do not consider how the Phenomenology relates the other parts, and some discount Hegel understanding and commitment to the natural philosophy of his day. This paper attempts to make the connection between the Phenomenology and the (...) Philosophy of 1805-06 explicit; to show where and how the connections are made; to identify how Hegel uses the natural sciences of his day in creating his system. By showing this I hope to prove that his concept of Spirit is born within his natural philosophy. It is part of his cosmology. Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman","serif";}. (shrink)
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  19. Nicholas Maxwell (forthcoming). Popper's Paradoxical Pursuit of Natural Philosophy. In J. Shearmur & G. Stokes (eds.), Cambridge Companion to Popper. Cambridge University Press.score: 139.2
    Philosophy of science is seen by most as a meta-discipline – one that takes science as its subject matter, and seeks to acquire knowledge and understanding about science without in any way affecting, or contributing to, science itself. Karl Popper’s approach is very different. His first love is natural philosophy or, as he would put it, cosmology. This intermingles cosmology and the rest of natural science with epistemology, methodology and metaphysics. Paradoxically, however, one of his best (...)
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  20. Jan-Erik Jones (2012). Review of John Locke and Natural Philosophy. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2012.score: 139.2
    This is a review of Peter Anstey's John Locke and Natural Philosophy, which is a masterful and well-argued study of Locke's philosophy of science that shall become both the standard and starting place, for scholars and students alike, for decades to come. Anstey's meticulous and thorough research, combined with his comprehensive knowledge of the history of natural philosophy, make this work a must-read for all who are interested in Locke, early modern philosophy, the history (...)
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  21. Charles T. Wolfe, Teleomechanism Redux? The Conceptual Hybridity of Living Machines in Early Modern Natural Philosophy.score: 138.0
    We have been accustomed at least since Kant and mainstream history of philosophy to distinguish between the ‘mechanical’ and the ‘teleological’; between a fully mechanistic, quantitative science of Nature exemplified by Newton (or Galileo, or Descartes) and a teleological, qualitative approach to living beings ultimately expressed in the concept of ‘organism’ – a purposive entity, or at least an entity possessed of functions. The beauty of this distinction is that it seems to make intuitive sense and to map onto (...)
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  22. Ursula Renz (2011). From Philosophy to Criticism of Myth: Cassirer's Concept of Myth. Synthese 179 (1):135 - 152.score: 136.8
    This article discusses the question whether or not Cassirer's philosophical critique of technological use of myth in The Myth of the State implies a revision of his earlier conception and theory of myth as provided by The Philosophy of Symbolic Forms. In the first part, Cassirer's early theory of myth is compared with other approaches of his time. It is claimed that Cassirer's early approach to myth has to be understood in terms of a transcendental philosophical approach. In consequence, (...)
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  23. Edward Grant (2007). A History of Natural Philosophy: From the Ancient World to the Nineteenth Century. Cambridge University Press.score: 133.8
    Natural philosophy encompassed all natural phenomena of the physical world. It sought to discover the physical causes of all natural effects and was little concerned with mathematics. By contrast, the exact mathematical sciences were narrowly confined to various computations that did not involve physical causes, functioning totally independently of natural philosophy. Although this began slowly to change in the late Middle Ages, a much more thoroughgoing union of natural philosophy and mathematics (...)
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  24. Sarah Powrie (2013). The Importance of Fourteenth-Century Natural Philosophy for Nicholas of Cusa's Infinite Universe. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 87 (1):33-53.score: 133.8
    This paper argues that Nicholas of Cusa’s investigation of infinity and incommensurability in De docta ignorantia was shaped by the mathematical innovations and thought experiments of fourteenth-century natural philosophy. Cusanus scholarship has overlooked this influence, in part because Raymond Klibansky’s influential edition of De docta ignorantia situated Cusa within the medieval Platonic tradition. However, Cusa departs from this tradition in a number of ways. His willingness to engage incommensurability and to compare different magnitudes of infinity distinguishes him (...)
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  25. Arthur Coleman Danto (1998). The Wake of Art: Essays: Criticism, Philosophy and the Ends of Taste. G+B Arts Int'l.score: 132.0
    Since the mid-1980s, Arthur C. Danto has been increasingly concerned with the implications of the demise of modernism. Out of the wake of modernist art, Danto discerns the emergence of a radically pluralistic art world. His essays illuminate this novel art world as well as the fate of criticism within it. As a result, Danto has crafted the most compelling philosophy of art criticism since Clement Greenberg. Gregg Horowitz and Tom Huhn analyze the constellation of philosophical and (...)
     
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  26. Angus Fletcher (2011). Evolving Hamlet: Seventeenth-Century English Tragedy and the Ethics of Natural Selection. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 132.0
  27. Grzegorz Bugajak (2009). Philosophy of Nature, Realism, and the Postulated Ontology of Scientific Theories. In Adam Świeżyński (ed.), Philosophy of Nature Today, Wydawnictwo UKSW, Warszawa. 59–80.score: 129.0
    The first part of the paper is a metatheoretical consideration of such philosophy of nature which allows for using scientific results in philosophical analyses. An epistemological 'judgment' of those results becomes a preliminary task of this discipline: this involves taking a position in the controversy between realistic and antirealistic accounts of science. It is shown that a philosopher of nature has to be a realist, if his task to build true ontology of reality is to be achieved. At the (...)
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  28. Dimitri Ginev (1992). Varianten der Kritischen WissenschaftstheorieVariants of Critical Philosophy of Science. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 23 (1):45-60.score: 129.0
    It is the purpose of this paper to represent an analysis of four variants of critical philosophy of science: the constructivistic methodology, the reflexion upon science from the viewpoint of the critical theory of society, the ‘social natural science’ as a further development of the finalization conception, and the projective philosophy of science. Special attention is paid to the comparison of these variants. Some points of convergence as well as of divergence among them are revealed. A common (...)
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  29. Dennis des Chene, How the World Became Mathematical.score: 128.6
    My title, of course, is an exaggeration. The world no more became mathematical in the seventeenth century than it became ironic in the nineteenth. Either it was mathematical all along, and seventeenth-century philosophers discovered it was, or, if it wasn’t, it could not have been made so by a few books. What became mathematical was physics, and whether that has any bearing on the furniture of the universe is one topic of this paper. Garber says, and I (...)
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  30. Feng Ye (2007). Indispensability Argument and Anti-Realism in Philosophy of Mathematics. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (4):614-628.score: 126.4
    The indispensability argument for abstract mathematical entities has been an important issue in the philosophy of mathematics. The argument relies on several assumptions. Some objections have been made against these assumptions, but there are several serious defects in these objections. Ameliorating these defects leads to a new anti-realistic philosophy of mathematics, mainly: first, in mathematical applications, what really exist and can be used as tools are not abstract mathematical entities, but our inner representations that we (...)
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  31. Peter Flügel (2012). Sacred Matter: Reflections on the Relationship of Karmic and Natural Causality in Jaina Philosophy. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (2):119-176.score: 126.0
    The article examines a fundamental problem in classical Jaina philosophy, namely, the ontological status of dead matter in the hylozoistic and at the same time dualistic Jaina worldview. This question is of particular interest in view of the widespread contemporary Jaina practice of venerating bone relics and stūpas of prominent saints. The main argument proposed in this article is, that, from a classical doctrinal point of view, bone relics of renowned ascetics are valuable for Jainas, if at all, because (...)
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  32. Aaron D. Cobb (2010). Natural Philosophy and the Use of Causal Terminology: A Puzzle in Reid's Account of Natural Philosophy. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 8 (2):101-114.score: 124.8
    Thomas Reid thinks of natural philosophy as a purely nomothetic enterprise but he maintains that it is proper for natural philosophers to employ causal terminology in formulating their explanatory claims. In this paper, I analyze this puzzle in light of Reid's distinction between efficient and physical causation – a distinction he grounds in his strict understanding of active powers. I consider several possible reasons that Reid may have for maintaining that natural philosophers ought to employ causal (...)
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  33. Stephen Gaukroger (2009). The Role of Natural Philosophy in the Development of Locke's Empiricism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):55 – 83.score: 124.8
    (2009). The Role of Natural Philosophy in the Development of Locke's Empiricism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 17, No. 1, pp. 55-83.
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  34. Paolo Mancosu (ed.) (2008/2011). The Philosophy of Mathematical Practice. OUP Oxford.score: 124.8
    Contemporary philosophy of mathematics offers us an embarrassment of riches. Among the major areas of work one could list developments of the classical foundational programs, analytic approaches to epistemology and ontology of mathematics, and developments at the intersection of history and philosophy of mathematics. But anyone familiar with contemporary philosophy of mathematics will be aware of the need for new approaches that pay closer attention to mathematical practice. This book is the first attempt to give a (...)
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  35. Denis Fisette (2010). Descriptive Psychology and Natural Sciences: Husserl’s Early Criticism of Brentano. In C. Iena (ed.), Edmund Husserl 150 Years: Philosophy, Phenomenology, Sciences. Springer. 221--253.score: 123.6
    In defining his phenomenology as descriptive psychology in the introduction to the first edition of his Logical Investigations 1, Husserl suggests that the field study of his phenomenology as his methodology are very close to that of Brentano’s psychology, and that the research in the book somehow contributes to Brentano’s philosophical program, one of whose main axes is psychology or philosophy of mind.
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  36. I. Grattan-Guinness (ed.) (1994). Companion Encyclopedia of the History and Philosophy of the Mathematical Sciences. Routledge.score: 123.4
    The Companion Encyclopedia is the first comprehensive work to cover all the principal lines and themes of the history and philosophy of mathematics from ancient times up to the twentieth century. In 176 articles contributed by 160 authors of 18 nationalities, the work describes and analyzes the variety of theories, proofs, techniques, and cultural and practical applications of mathematics. The work's aim is to recover our mathematical heritage and show the importance of mathematics today by treating its interactions (...)
     
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  37. Martin Pleitz (2010). Curves in Gödel-Space: Towards a Structuralist Ontology of Mathematical Signs. Studia Logica 96 (2):193 - 218.score: 122.6
    I propose an account of the metaphysics of the expressions of a mathematical language which brings together the structuralist construal of a mathematical object as a place in a structure, the semantic notion of indexicality and Kit Fine's ontological theory of qua objects. By contrasting this indexical qua objects account with several other accounts of the metaphysics of mathematical expressions, I show that it does justice both to the abstractness that mathematical expressions have because they are (...)
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  38. Imre Lakatos (1976). Proofs and Refutations: The Logic of Mathematical Discovery. Cambridge University Press.score: 121.8
    Proofs and Refutations is essential reading for all those interested in the methodology, the philosophy and the history of mathematics. Much of the book takes the form of a discussion between a teacher and his students. They propose various solutions to some mathematical problems and investigate the strengths and weaknesses of these solutions. Their discussion (which mirrors certain real developments in the history of mathematics) raises some philosophical problems and some problems about the nature of mathematical discovery (...)
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  39. Baien Miura (1991). Deep Words: Miura Baien's System of Natural Philosophy. E.J. Brill.score: 121.6
    "Deep Words contains translations of "Honso, the "Core Text" of "Gengo, by Miura Baien, 1723-1789 - a widely renowned Japanese teacher and writer of his time; ...
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  40. Alfred A. Vichutinsky (2008). Of a Real Philosophy and the Natural Sciences Free of the Paranoia. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 41:47-55.score: 121.0
    The bases of tenets of the World came from the East; Pythagoras learnt all there up the 26 years. At a home, the east ideas where took in no; then he bound the mathematics with the elements of matter. This was the best way to a blood feud of the all Humanity. The 17th age gave the bases of mathematics and the Greek atomism; this had led to the paranoia in all sciences. The LCE was brought in 19th age with (...)
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  41. Marije Martijn (2010). Proclus on Nature: Philosophy of Nature and its Methods in Proclus' Commentary on Plato's Timaeus. Brill.score: 120.6
    One of the hardest questions to answer for a (Neo)platonist is to what extent and how the changing and unreliable world of sense perception can itself be an object of scientific knowledge. My dissertation is a study of the answer given to that question by the Neoplatonist Proclus (Athens, 411-485) in his Commentary on Plato’s Timaeus. I present a new explanation of Proclus’ concept of nature and show that philosophy of nature consists of several related subdisciplines matching the ontological (...)
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  42. Antal Müller (1991). Interaction and Determination: Attempt at Elaborating an Up-to-Date Theory of Determinacy in Natural Philosophy. Akadémiai Kiadó.score: 120.2
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  43. J. Gregory (2010). The Political Philosophy of Walzer's Social Criticism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 36 (9):1093-1111.score: 120.0
    This article calls for a critical re-evaluation of Walzer’s theory of justice. It argues that there is a deep tension between Walzer’s social criticism and his complex equality. Social criticism is based on the normative value of a connected and ‘whole’ self, and complex equality is based upon a value pluralism that threatens to fragment this sense of wholeness. Walzer therefore commissions a tacit premise, borrowing from the same ‘political philosophy’ that he explicitly repudiates, and which social (...)
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  44. H. Rosa (2004). Four Levels of Self-Interpretation: A Paradigm for Interpretive Social Philosophy and Political Criticism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (5-6):691-720.score: 120.0
    If we are to find the criteria for critical analyses of social arrangements and processes not in some abstract, universalist framework, but from the guiding ‘self-interpretations’ of the societies in question, as contemporary contextualist and ‘communitarian’ approaches to social philosophy suggest, the vexing question arises as to where these self-interpretations can be found and how they are identified. The paper presents a model according to which there are four interdependent as well as partially autonomous spheres or ‘levels’ of socially (...)
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  45. Dominic Klyve (2013). Darwin, Malthus, Süssmilch, and Euler: The Ultimate Origin of the Motivation for the Theory of Natural Selection. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology:1-24.score: 120.0
    It is fairly well known that Darwin was inspired to formulate his theory of natural selection by reading Thomas Malthus’s Essay on the Principle of Population. In fact, by reading Darwin’s notebooks, we can even locate one particular sentence which started Darwin thinking about population and selection. What has not been done before is to explain exactly where this sentence – essentially Malthus’s ideas about geometric population growth – came from. In this essay we show that eighteenth century mathematician (...)
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  46. Sharon Macdonald (2010). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (4):731-735.score: 120.0
    (2010). The Philosophy of Enchantment: Studies in Folktale, Cultural Criticism, and Anthropology. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 18, No. 4, pp. 731-735.
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  47. Richard Dien Winfield (1995). Natural Beauty and the Philosophy of Art. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 9 (1):48 - 62.score: 120.0
    Beauty's joining of meaning and configuration involves a concrete universality exhibiting the logic of self-determination distinguishing the reality of rational agency. Consequently, natural beauty presents a challenge to aesthetics. An examination of the ordering principles commonly ascribed to nature (the abstract universality of efficient causality, the generic universality of species being, and the reciprocal functionality of organic unity) shows that they all lack concrete universality, establishing that aesthetics must be the philosophy of art and that natural beauty (...)
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  48. Lisa Downing (2005). Berkeley's Natural Philosophy and Philosophy of Science. In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Berkeley. Cambridge University Press. 230--265.score: 119.8
    Although George Berkeley himself made no major scientific discoveries, nor formulated any novel theories, he was nonetheless actively concerned with the rapidly evolving science of the early eighteenth century. Berkeley's works display his keen interest in natural philosophy and mathematics from his earliest writings (Arithmetica, 1707) to his latest (Siris, 1744). Moreover, much of his philosophy is fundamentally shaped by his engagement with the science of his time. In Berkeley's best-known philosophical works, the Principles and Dialogues, he (...)
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  49. Robert A. Di Curcio (1975). The Natural Philosophy of the Greeks: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of Science. Aeternium Pub..score: 119.4
  50. G. Dammann (2010). Opera and the Limits of Philosophy: On Bernard Williams's Music Criticism. British Journal of Aesthetics 50 (4):469-479.score: 119.2
    This paper provides a reading of the opera criticism of Bernard Williams in the light of his philosophical writings. Beginning with the observations that his philosophical writing lacks engagement with musical and aesthetic issues, and his operatic writing appears to present no particular philosophy of the subject, I try to draw together certain themes by mapping Williams's operatic concerns onto his philosophical project more generally. I argue that the 'excessive' nature of the artform—the idea that opera tends to (...)
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