Search results for 'Cross-Cultural Comparison congresses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Cherry (2006). The Impact of Normative Influence and Locus of Control on Ethical Judgments and Intentions: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 68 (2):113 - 132.score: 605.3
    The study extends the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB) in a cross-cultural setting, incorporating ethical judgments and locus of control in a comparison of Taiwanese and US businesspersons. A self-administered survey of 698 businesspersons from the US and Taiwan examined several hypothesized differences. Results indicate that while Taiwanese respondents have a more favorable attitude toward a requested bribe than US counterparts, and are less likely to view it as an ethical issue, their higher locus externality causes ethical judgments (...)
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  2. Mariya A. Yukhymenko-Lescroart (2014). Ethical Beliefs Toward Academic Dishonesty: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Undergraduate Students in Ukraine and the United States. Journal of Academic Ethics 12 (1):29-41.score: 576.0
    Little work has been done on beliefs toward academic misconduct in Ukraine. This study explored the beliefs of Ukrainian students toward various forms of academic misconduct and compared the results to the U.S. undergraduate students (N = 270). Twenty-two forms of cheating, plagiarism, and questionable academic behaviors were grouped in five categories: unilateral cheating, collective cheating, falsification gaining favoritism, and performing extra work to receive better grades. Cross-cultural comparisons of beliefs were pivotal in this study. Results indicated that, in (...)
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  3. Henrietta Grönlund, Kirsten Holmes, Chulhee Kang, Ram Cnaan, Femida Handy, Jeffrey Brudney, Debbie Haski-Leventhal, Lesley Hustinx, Meenaz Kassam, Lucas Meijs, Anne Pessi, Bhangyashree Ranade, Karen Smith, Naoto Yamauchi & Siniša Zrinščak (2011). Cultural Values and Volunteering: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Students' Motivation to Volunteer in 13 Countries. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 9 (2):87-106.score: 560.3
    Voluntary participation is connected to cultural, political, religious and social contexts. Social and societal factors can provide opportunities, expectations and requirements for voluntary activity, as well as influence the values and norms promoting this. These contexts are especially central in the case of voluntary participation among students as they are often responding to the societal demands for building a career and qualifying for future assignments and/or government requirements for completing community service. This article questions how cultural values affect attitudes towards (...)
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  4. Roger J. Volkema & Maria Tereza Leme Fleury (2002). Alternative Negotiating Conditions and the Choice of Negotiation Tactics: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 36 (4):381 - 398.score: 560.3
    The growth in international trade in recent years necessitates a better understanding of customs and expectations in cross-cultural negotiations. While several researchers have sought to examine and detail the similarities and differences between select countries, their data have generally been obtained under neutral or unspecified negotiating conditions. However, issue importance, opponent (prowess, ethical reputation), and context (location, confederate awareness, urgency) can play a significant role in the use of negotiating tactics. This paper describes a study comparing the perceptions of (...)
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  5. Mark A. Davis, Nancy Brown Johnson & Douglas G. Ohmer (1998). Issue-Contingent Effects on Ethical Decision Making: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 17 (4):373-389.score: 526.5
    This experiment examined the effects of three elements comprising Jones' (1991) moral intensity construct, (social consensus, personal proximity, and magnitude of consequences) in a cross-cultural comparison of ethical decision making within a human resource management (HRM) context. Results indicated social consensus had the most potent effect on judgments of moral concern and judgments of immorality. An analysis of American, Eastern European, and Indonesian responses also indicted socio-cultural differences were moderated by the type of HRM ethical issue. In addition, (...)
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  6. Isabelle Maignan (2001). Consumers' Perceptions of Corporate Social Responsibilities: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (1):57 - 72.score: 519.8
    Based on a consumer survey conducted in France, Germany, and the U.S., the study investigates consumers'' readiness to support socially responsible organizations and examines their evaluations of the economic, legal, ethical, and philanthropic responsibilities of the firm. French and German consumers appear more willing to actively support responsible businesses than their U.S. counterparts. While U.S. consumers value highly corporate eco-nomic responsibilities, French and German consumers are most concerned about businesses conforming with legal and ethical standards. These findings provide useful guidance (...)
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  7. Cecilia Essau (1992). Primary-Secondary Control and Coping: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. S. Roderer Verlag.score: 519.8
     
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  8. Xianglong Zhang (2010). Comparison Paradox, Comparative Situation and Inter-Paradigmaticy: A Methodological Reflection on Cross-Cultural Philosophical Comparison [Abstract]. Comparative Philosophy 1 (1).score: 513.8
    It is commonly believed that philosophica l comparison depends on having some common measure or standard between and above the compared parts. The paper is to show that the foregoing common belief is incorrect and therewith to inquire into the possibility of cross-cultural philosophical comparison. First, the ‘comparison paradox’ will be expounded. It is a theoretical difficulty for the philosophical tendency represented by Plato’s theory of Ideas to justify comparative activities. Further, the connection of the comparative (...)
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  9. Katharine MacDonald (2007). Cross-Cultural Comparison of Learning in Human Hunting. Human Nature 18 (4):386-402.score: 497.3
    This paper is a cross-cultural examination of the development of hunting skills and the implications for the debate on the role of learning in the evolution of human life history patterns. While life history theory has proven to be a powerful tool for understanding the evolution of the human life course, other schools, such as cultural transmission and social learning theory, also provide theoretical insights. These disparate theories are reviewed, and alternative and exclusive predictions are identified. This study of (...)
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  10. Terence Jackson & Marian Calafell Artola (1997). Ethical Beliefs and Management Behaviour: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 16 (11):1163-1173.score: 494.3
    A cross-cultural empirical study is reported in this article which looks at ethical beliefs and behaviours among French and German managers, and compares this with previous studies of U.S. and Israeli managers using a similar questionnaire. Comparisons are made between what managers say they believe, and what they do, between managers and their peers' attitudes and behaviours, and between perceived top management attitudes and the existence of company policy. In the latter, significant differences are found by national ownership of (...)
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  11. Mette Sagbakken, Jan Frich, Gunnar Bjune & John Porter (2013). Ethical Aspects of Directly Observed Treatment for Tuberculosis: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] BMC Medical Ethics 14 (1):25.score: 479.3
    Tuberculosis is a major global public health challenge, and a majority of countries have adopted a version of the global strategy to fight Tuberculosis, Directly Observed Treatment, Short Course (DOTS). Drawing on results from research in Ethiopia and Norway, the aim of this paper is to highlight and discuss ethical aspects of the practice of Directly Observed Treatment (DOT) in a cross-cultural perspective.
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  12. Mona Mamulea (2012). A Thought Experiment of Cross-Cultural Comparison. The Question of Rationality. Cercetări Filosofico-Psihologice 4 (2):105-114.score: 459.8
    David Bloor’s thought experiment is taken into consideration to suggest that the rationality of the Other cannot be inferred by way of argument for the reason that it is unavoidably contained as a hidden supposition by any argument engaged in proving it. We are able to understand a different culture only as far as we recognize in it the same kind of rationality that works in our own culture. Another kind of rationality is either impossible, or indiscernible.
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  13. Greg Wood (2000). A Cross Cultural Comparison of the Contents of Codes of Ethics: USA, Canada and Australia. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 25 (4):287 - 298.score: 456.8
    This paper examines the contents of the codes of ethics of 83 of the top 500 companies operating in the private sector in Australia in an attempt to discover whether there are national characteristics that differentiate the codes used by companies operating in Australia from codes used by companies operating in the American and Canadian systems. The studies that were used as a comparison were Mathews (1987) for the United States of America and Lefebvre and Singh (1992) for Canada. (...)
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  14. Soheila Mirshekary & Ann D. K. Lawrence (2009). Academic and Business Ethical Misconduct and Cultural Values: A Cross National Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 7 (3):141-157.score: 454.5
    Efforts to promote ethical behaviour in business and academic contexts have raised awareness of the need for an ethical orientation in business students. This study examines the similarities and differences between the personal values of Iranian and Australian business students and their attitudes to cheating behaviour in universities and unethical practices in business settings. Exploratory factory analysis provided support for three distinct ethics factors—serious academic ethical misconduct, minor academic ethical misconduct, and business ethical misconduct. Results reveal statistically significant differences between (...)
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  15. P. Maria Joseph Christie, Ik-Whan G. Kwon, Philipp A. Stoeberl & Raymond Baumhart (2003). A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Ethical Attitudes of Business Managers: India Korea and the United States. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (3):263 - 287.score: 447.8
    Culture has been identified as a significant determinant of ethical attitudes of business managers. This research studies the impact of culture on the ethical attitudes of business managers in India, Korea and the United States using multivariate statistical analysis. Employing Geert Hofstede''s cultural typology, this study examines the relationship between his five cultural dimensions (individualism, power distance, uncertainty avoidance, masculinity, and long-term orientation) and business managers'' ethical attitudes. The study uses primary data collected from 345 business manager participants of Executive (...)
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  16. Md Zabid Rashid & Saidatul Ibrahim (2008). The Effect of Culture and Religiosity on Business Ethics: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):907 - 917.score: 447.8
    This article examined the effect of culture and religiosity on perceptions of business ethics among students in a tertiary institution in Malaysia. A structured questionnaire was developed with scenarios on various aspects of business ethics, and self-administered to the students in the business studies program. The results from 767 respondents showed that there were significant differences among the Malays, Chinese, and Indian students on seven scenarios namely selling hazardous products, misleading instructions, selling defective products, padding expense account, taking sick to (...)
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  17. Helmut Becker & David J. Fritzsche (1987). Business Ethics: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Managers' Attitudes. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 6 (4):289 - 295.score: 447.8
    A comparison of attitudes among managers from France, Germany and the United States is made with respect to codes of ethics and ethical business philosophy. Findings are also compared with past studies by Baumhart and by Brenner and Molander where data are available. While the current data appear to be consistent with the past studies, there appear to be differences in attitudes among the managers from the three countries.
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  18. Steven Lysonski & William Gaidis (1991). A Cross-Cultural Comparison of the Ethics of Business Students. Journal of Business Ethics 10 (2):141 - 150.score: 447.8
    The ethical tendencies of university business students from the USA, Denmark, and New Zealand were examined by analyzing their reactions to ethical dilemmas presented in a set of ethical problem situations. These dilemmas dealt with coercion and control, conflict of interest, physical environment, paternalism and personal integrity. Findings indicate that students' reactions tended to be similar regardless of their country. A comparison of these findings to practicing managers indicated that students and practicing managers exhibit a similar degree of sensitivity (...)
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  19. Christopher J. Robertson, Bradley J. Olson, K. Matthew Gilley & Yongjian Bao (2008). A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Ethical Orientations and Willingness to Sacrifice Ethical Standards: China Versus Peru. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):413 - 425.score: 444.8
    Despite an increase in international business ethics research in recent years, the number of studies focused on Latin America and China has been deficient. As trade among Pacific Rim nations increases, an understanding of the ethical beliefs of the people in this region of the world will become increasingly important. In the current study 208 respondents from Peru and China are queried about their ethical ideologies, firm practices, and commitment to organizational performance. The empirical results reveal that Chinese workers are (...)
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  20. Robert W. Armstrong & Jill Sweeney (1994). Industry Type, Culture, Mode of Entry and Perceptions of International Marketing Ethics Problems: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 13 (10):775 - 785.score: 441.8
    The authors investigate the differences in ethical perceptions of Australian and Hong Kong international managers. Ethical perceptions are measured with respect to different industry types, cultures and modes of entry into international markets. Mode of entry refers to how firms select to enter foreign markets. Modes of entry include: exporting (indirect or direct), contractual methods (licensing and franchising) and via direct foreign investment (joint ventures and wholly-owned subsidiaries). It was determined that culture and mode of entry have a significant effect (...)
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  21. Earl D. Honeycutt, Judy A. Siguaw & Tammy G. Hunt (1995). Business Ethics and Job-Related Constructs: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Automotive Salespeople. Journal of Business Ethics 14 (3):235 - 248.score: 441.8
    Although a number of articles have addressed ethical perceptions and behaviors, few studies have examined ethics across cultures. This research focuses on measuring the job satisfaction, customer orientation, ethics, and ethical training of automotive salespersons in the U.S. and Taiwan. The relationships of these variables to salesperson performance were also investigated. Ethics training was found to be negatively related to perceived levels of ethicalness and performance. High performance U.S. salespeople reported high ethical behavior, while the opposite was true in Taiwan. (...)
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  22. Lin Ge & Stuart Thomas (2008). A Cross-Cultural Comparison of the Deliberative Reasoning of Canadian and Chinese Accounting Students. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):189 - 211.score: 441.8
    Using Hofstede's culture theory (1980, 2001 Culture's Consequences: Comparing Values, Behaviours, Institutions, and Organizations Across Nation. Sage, NewYork), the current study incorporates the moral development (e.g. Thorne, 2000; Thorne and Magnan, 2000; Thorne et al., 2003) and multidimensional ethics scale (e.g. Cohen et al., 1993; Cohen et al., 1996b; Cohen et al., 2001; Flory et al., 1992) approaches to compare the ethical reasoning and decisions of Canadian and Mainland Chinese final year undergraduate accounting students. The results indicate that Canadian accounting (...)
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  23. Barbro Wadensten, Stig Wenneberg, Marit Silén, Ping Fen Tang & Gerd Ahlström (2008). A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Nurses' Ethical Concerns. Nursing Ethics 15 (6):745-760.score: 441.8
    The aim of this study was to compare Swedish and Chinese nurses' experiences of ethical dilemmas and workplace distress in order to deepen understanding of the challenges neuroscience nurses encounter in different cultures. Qualitative interviews from two previously performed empirical studies in Sweden and China were the basis of this comparative study. Four common content areas were identified in both studies: ethical dilemmas, workplace distress, quality of nursing and managing distress. The themes formulated within each content area were compared and (...)
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  24. Thomas W. Whipple & Dominic F. Swords (1992). Business Ethics Judgments: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 11 (9):671 - 678.score: 438.8
    With the increased attention paid to ethical issues in business practice, there is interest in the ethics gap between the U.S. and the U.K. and in the ramifications for educating college students for business management positions. This paper examines the differences in ethics judgments between U.S. and U.K. business students. The results indicate that differences in their demographic profiles do not influence their ethics judgments. However, consistently higher business ethics of female students from both countries are discussed in relation to (...)
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  25. Mahmut Arslan (2000). A Cross-Cultural Comparison of British and Turkish Managers in Terms of Protestant Work Ethic Characteristics. Business Ethics 9 (1):13–19.score: 438.8
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  26. Mahmut Arslan (2001). A Cross‐Cultural Comparison of Achievement and Power Orientation as Leadership Dimensions in Three European Countries: Britain, Ireland and Turkey. Business Ethics 10 (4):340–345.score: 438.8
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  27. Scott J. Vitell & Abhijit Patwardhan (2008). The Role of Moral Intensity and Moral Philosophy in Ethical Decision Making: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of China and the European Union. Business Ethics 17 (2):196–209.score: 438.8
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  28. J. Robertson Christopher, J. Olson Bradley & Yongjian Bao K. Matthew Gilley (2008). A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Ethical Orientations and Willingness to Sacrifice Ethical Standards: China Versus Peru. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2).score: 438.8
    Despite an increase in international business ethics research in recent years, the number of studies focused on Latin America and China has been deficient. As trade among Pacific Rim nations increases, an understanding of the ethical beliefs of the people in this region of the world will become increasingly important. In the current study 208 respondents from Peru and China are queried about their ethical ideologies, firm practices, and commitment to organizational performance. The empirical results reveal that Chinese workers are (...)
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  29. Marilyn Okleshen & Richard Hoyt (1996). A Cross Cultural Comparison of Ethical Perspectives and Decision Approaches of Business Students: United States of America Versus New Zealand. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 15 (5):537 - 549.score: 438.8
    While differences do exist, there are many ethical issues which transcend national barriers. In order to contribute to the development of understanding of global ethics, this study documents the existing ethical perspectives of collegiate business students from two countries and identifies the determinants of their ethical orientations.A survey instrument was administered to USA and New Zealand (NZ) students enrolled in undergraduate business programs. The research instrument measured students' ethical perspectives across multilayered ethical domains and their self-professed decision method used in (...)
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  30. Michel Ferrari & Emiko Koyama (forthcoming). Meta-Emotions About Anger and Amae: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. Consciousness and Emotion.score: 438.8
  31. Mehran Nejati, Azlan Amran & Amirul Shah Md Shahbudin (2011). Attitudes Towards Business Ethics: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Students in Iran and Malaysia. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 6 (1):68.score: 438.8
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  32. Debra Worthington, Margaret Fitch-Hauser, Tuula-Riitta Välikoski, Margarete Imhof & Sei-Hill Kim (2012). Listening and Privacy Management in Mobile Phone Conversations: Cross-Cultural Comparison of Finnish, German, Korean and United States Students. Empedocles 3 (1):43-60.score: 438.8
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  33. L. L. Klessig & J. G. Hagengruber (1999). Eleven Necessary Conditions for Sustainability: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. Journal of Human Values 5 (1):33-52.score: 438.8
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  34. Mehran Nejati, Azlan Amran & Amirul Shah Md Shahbudin (2011). Attitudes Towards Business Ethics: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Students in Iran and Malaysia. International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 6 (1):68-82.score: 438.8
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  35. Tsilia Romm & Amos Drory (1988). Political Behavior in Organizations—A Cross-Cultural Comparison. International Journal of Value-Based Management 1 (2):97-113.score: 438.8
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  36. Adebowale W. Akande (2009). The Self‐Perception and Cultural Dimensions: Cross‐Cultural Comparison. Educational Studies 35 (1):81-92.score: 438.8
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  37. Brian K. Burton, Jiing-Lih Farh & W. Harvey Hegarty (2000). A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Corporate Social Responsibility Orientation: Hong Kong Vs. United States Students. Teaching Business Ethics 4 (2):151-167.score: 438.8
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  38. P. Christie (2003). Maria Joseph, Ik-Whan G. Kwon, Philipp A. Stoberl, and Raymond Baumhart (2003),“A Cross-Cultural Comparison of Ethical Attitudes of Business Managers: India, Korea and the United States,”. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 46 (3):263-87.score: 438.8
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  39. R. Glasberg (1995). Confronting the Ultimate Reality in the Context of Historical Evolution-a Cross-Cultural Comparison of China, India and the West. Ultimate Reality and Meaning 18 (4):303-322.score: 438.8
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  40. Eva Lavric (2010). Hyperbolic Approximative Numerals in Cross-Cultural Comparison. In Gunther Kaltenböck, Wiltrud Mihatsch & Stefan Schneider (eds.), New Approaches to Hedging. Emerald. 123--164.score: 438.8
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  41. Lourens Minnema (2008). The Complex Nature of Religious Sacrifice in the Mahabharata, in the Bagavadgita, and in General. A Cross-Cultural Comparison Between Indian and Western Theories of Religious Sacrifice. Neue Zeitschrift Für Systematische Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 50 (3-4).score: 438.8
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  42. Pavol Prokop, Murat Özel & Muhammet Uşak (2009). Cross-Cultural Comparison of Student Attitudes Toward Snakes. Society and Animals 17 (3):224-240.score: 438.8
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  43. Randi L. Sims (1996). Ethical Decision Making: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. International Journal of Value-Based Management 9 (1):77-88.score: 438.8
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  44. Freddie C. Sotto & John J. Kohls (1990). White-Collar Work Values and Attitudes: A Cross-Cultural Comparison of the U.S. And the Philippines. International Journal of Value-Based Management 3 (2):21-35.score: 438.8
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  45. R. Tansey, M. R. Hyman & G. M. Zinkhan (forthcoming). Cultural Themes in Brazilian and US Auto Ads: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. Journal of Advertising:30--39.score: 438.8
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  46. Jackson Terence & Artola Marian Calafell (1997). Ethical Beliefs and Management Behaviour: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. Journal of Business Ethics 16 (11).score: 438.8
     
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  47. Murat Özel, Pavol Prokop & Muhammet Uşak (2009). Cross-Cultural Comparison of Student Attitudes Toward Snakes. Society and Animals 17 (3):224-240.score: 438.8
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  48. R. Voltz, A. Akabayashi, C. Reese, G. Ohi & H. M. Sass (1999). Attitudes of Healthcare Professionals Toward Clinical Decisions in Palliative Care: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. Journal of Clinical Ethics 10 (4):309.score: 438.8
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