Search results for 'Culture Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. József Lukács & Ferenc Tőkei (eds.) (1983). Philosophy and Culture: Studies From Hungary Published on the Occasion of the 17th World Congress of Philosophy. Akadémiai Kiadó.score: 48.0
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  2. Sonu Shamdasani & Michael Münchow (eds.) (1994). Speculations After Freud: Psychoanalysis, Philosophy, and Culture. Routledge.score: 42.0
    Speculations After Freud confronts the dilemmas of contemporary psychoanalysis by bringing together some of the most influential and best known writers on psychoanalysis and culture. These advocates and critics of psychoanalysis, both institutional and theoretical, reveal the powerful role psychoanalytic speculation plays in all areas of culture. Psychoanalysis has played a pivotal role in challenging the modernist notions of rationality and selfhood. It offers an alternative means of examining how identity is engendered, yet its identity has come into (...)
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  3. Venant Cauchy (ed.) (1988). Philosophie Et Culture: Actes Du Xviie Congrès Mondial De Philosophie. Editions Montmorency.score: 39.0
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  4. Kjell S. Johannessen & Tore Nordenstam (eds.) (1996). Wittgenstein and the Philosophy of Culture: Proceedings of the 18th International Wittgenstein Symposium, 13th to 20th August 1995, Kirchberg Am Wechsel (Austria). [REVIEW] Hölder-Pichler-Tempsky.score: 39.0
     
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  5. Michael Krausz & Richard Shusterman (eds.) (1999). Interpretation, Relativism, and the Metaphysics of Culture: Themes in the Philosophy of Joseph Margolis. Humanity Books.score: 39.0
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  6. Sophie McGrath (2008). The Adaptation of the Roman Catholic Tradition of Christianity to White Australian Culture: The Australasian Catholic Congresses of 1900, 1904 and 1909. [REVIEW] Australasian Catholic Record, The 85 (1):37.score: 36.0
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  7. James Donald (ed.) (1991). Psychoanalysis and Cultural Theory: Thresholds. St. Martin's Press.score: 33.0
  8. H. Odera Oruka & D. A. Masolo (eds.) (1983). Philosophy and Cultures: Proceedings of 2nd Afro-Asian Philosophy Conference, Nairobi, October/November 1981. Bookwise Ltd..score: 33.0
     
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  9. Merry Bullock (ed.) (1991). The Development of Intentional Action: Cognitive, Motivational, and Interactive Processes. Karger.score: 30.0
  10. V. P. Fetisov (ed.) (2006). Sovremennai͡a Rossii͡a: Zabvenie Absoli͡utov: Materialy Mezhvuzovskoĭ Nauchnoĭ Konferent͡sii, 12-13 Mai͡a 2006 Goda. Voronezhskai͡a Gos. Lesotekhn. Akademii͡a.score: 30.0
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  11. Józef Życiński (ed.) (1980). The Human Person and Philosophy in the Contemporary World: Proceedings of the Meeting of the World Union of Catholic Philosophical Societies, Cracow, 23-25 August 1978. [REVIEW] Pontifical Faculty of Theology.score: 30.0
     
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  12. Elena Aronova (2012). The Congress for Cultural Freedom, Minerva, and the Quest for Instituting “Science Studies” in the Age of Cold War. Minerva 50 (3):307-337.score: 24.0
    The Congress for Cultural Freedom is remembered as a paramount example of the “cultural cold wars.” In this paper, I discuss the ways in which this powerful transnational organization sought to promote “science studies” as a distinct – and politically relevant – area of expertise, and part of the CCF broader agenda to offer a renewed framework for liberalism. By means of its Study Groups, international conferences and its periodicals, such as Minerva, the Congress developed into an influential forum for (...)
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  13. Elena Aronova (2012). The Congress for Cultural Freedom, Minerva, and the Quest for Instituting “Science Studies” in the Age of Cold War. Minerva 50 (3):307-337.score: 24.0
    The Congress for Cultural Freedom is remembered as a paramount example of the “cultural cold wars.” In this paper, I discuss the ways in which this powerful transnational organization sought to promote “science studies” as a distinct – and politically relevant – area of expertise, and part of the CCF broader agenda to offer a renewed framework for liberalism. By means of its Study Groups, international conferences and its periodicals, such as Minerva, the Congress developed into an influential forum for (...)
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  14. Ram Chandra Pandeya & Siddheswar Rameshwar Bhatt (eds.) (1976). Knowledge, Culture, and Value: Papers Presented in Plenary Sessions, Panel Discussions, and Sectional Meetings of World Philosophy Conference, Golden Jubilee Session of the Indian Philosophical Congress, December 28, 1975 to January 3, 1976. [REVIEW] Motilal Banarsidass.score: 24.0
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  15. Brian Bocking (2013). Flagging Up Buddhism: Charles Pfoundes (Omoie Tetzunostzuke) Among the International Congresses and Expositions, 1893–1905. Contemporary Buddhism 14 (1):17-37.score: 21.0
    Charles James William Pfoundes (1840?1907), a young emigrant from Southeast Ireland, spent most of his adult life in Japan, received a Japanese name ?Omoie Tetzunostzuke?, first embraced and then turned against Theosophy and, from 1893, was ordained in several Japanese Buddhist traditions. Lacking independent means but educated, intellectually curious, entrepreneurial, fluent in Japanese and with a keen interest in Asian culture, Pfoundes subsisted as a cultural intermediary, explaining Japan and Asia to both Japanese and foreign audiences and actively seeking (...)
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  16. Giorgi Kankava (2013). The Continuous Model of Culture: Modernity Decline—a Eurocentric Bias? An Attempt to Introduce an Absolute Value Into a Model of Culture. Human Studies 36 (3):411-433.score: 18.0
    This paper means to demonstrate the theoretical-and-methodological potential of a particular pattern of thought about culture. Employing an end-means and absolute value plus concept of reality approach, the continuous model of culture aims to embrace from one holistic standpoint various concepts and debates of the modern human, social, and political sciences. The paper revisits the fact versus value, nature versus culture, culture versus structure, agency versus structure, and economics versus politics debates and offers the concepts of (...)
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  17. Maria Kronfeldner (2009). If There is Nothing Beyond the Organic...: Heredity and Culture at the Boundaries of Anthropology in the Work of Alfred L. Kroeber. [REVIEW] NTM - Journal of the History of Science, Technology and Medicine 17 (2):107-134.score: 18.0
    Continuing Franz Boas' work to establish anthropology as an academic discipline in the US at the turn of the twentieth century, Alfred L. Kroeber re-defined culture as a phenomenon sui generis. To achieve this he asked geneticists to enter into a coalition against hereditarian thoughts prevalent at that time in the US. The goal was to create space for anthropology as a separate discipline within academia, distinct from other disciplines. To this end he crossed the boundary separating anthropology from (...)
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  18. George Ofori (2009). Ethical Leadership: Examining the Relationships with Full Range Leadership Model, Employee Outcomes, and Organizational Culture. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 90 (4):533 - 547.score: 18.0
    Leadership which lacks ethical conduct can be dangerous, destructive, and even toxic. Ethical leadership, though well discussed in the literature, has been tested empirically as a construct in very few studies. An empirical investigation of ethical leadership in Singapore's construction industry is reported. It is found that ethical leadership is positively and significantly associated with transformational leadership, transformational culture of organization, contingent reward dimension of transactional leadership, leader effectiveness, employee willingness to put in extra effort, and employee satisfaction with (...)
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  19. Keqian Xu (2009). 儒家思想与中国传统文化的价值优先观(Confucianism and the Value Priority in Traditional Chinese Culture). 孔子研究 Confucius Studies 2009 (2):22-27.score: 18.0
    Confucianism has a deep influence on the opinion of value priority in traditional Chinese culture, which consider the value of morality prior to that of utility; the value of moral merit prior to that of intelligent; the value of group prior to that of individuals; the value of peace and safety prior to that of freedom and liberty; the value of harmony prior to that of conflict. This kind of value priority has performed very important and positive functions in (...)
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  20. D. J. Saab & F. Fonseca (forthcoming). Ontological Complexity and Human Culture. In R. Hagengruber (ed.), Proceedings of Philosophy's Relevance in Information Science.score: 18.0
    Ontologies are being used by information scientists in order to facilitate the sharing of meaningful information. However, computational ontologies are problematic in that they often decontextualize information. The semantic content of information is dependent upon the context in which it exists and the experience through which it emerges. For true semantic interoperability to occur among diverse information systems, within or across domains, information must remain contextualized. In order to bring more context to computational ontologies, we introduce culture as an (...)
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  21. Maria Kronfeldner (2007). Darwinism, Memes, and Creativity: A Critique of Darwinian Analogical Reasoning From Nature to Culture. Dissertation, University of Regensburgscore: 18.0
    The dissertation criticizes two analogical applications of Darwinism to the spheres of mind and culture: the Darwinian approach to creativity and memetics. These theories rely on three basic analogies: the ontological analogy states that the basic ontological units of culture are so-called memes, which are replicators like genes; the origination analogy states that novelty in human creativity emerges in a "blind" Darwinian manner; and the explanatory units of selection analogy states that memes are "egoistic" and that they can (...)
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  22. Brian W. Kulik (2005). Agency Theory, Reasoning and Culture at Enron: In Search of a Solution. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):347 - 360.score: 18.0
    Applying evidence from recently available public information on Enron, I defined Enron’s culture as one rooted in agency theory by asserting that Enron’s members were predominantly agency-reasoning individuals. I then identified conditions present at Enron’s collapse: a strong agency culture with collectively non-compliant norms, a munificent rare-failure environment, and new hires with little business ethics training. Turning to four possible antidotes (selection, objectivist integrity, integrity capacity, and stewardship reasoning) to an agency culture under these conditions, I argued (...)
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  23. Sirkku Ikonen (2011). Cassirer's Critique of Culture: Between the Scylla of Lebensphilosophie and the Charybdis of the Vienna Circle. Synthese 179 (1):187 - 202.score: 18.0
    My purpose in this paper is to look at Cassirer's relation to critical philosophy from a new perspective. Most discussions concerning Cassirer's Kantianism have so far centered on his relation to neo-Kantianism and the Marburg school. My focus will not be on neo-Kantianism but on Cassirer's notion of a "critique of culture." In an often cited paragraph from the introduction to The Philosophy of Symbolic Forms, Cassirer says that his aim is to broaden Kant's critical approach to all various (...)
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  24. Richard H. Bell (ed.) (1993). Simone Weil's Philosophy of Culture: Readings Toward a Divine Humanity. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    As the editor of this volume writes in his introduction: 'Simone Weil's philosophy is one that interrogates and contemplates our culture; it makes us aware of our lack of attention to words and empty ideologies, to human suffering, to the indignity of work, to our excessive use of power, to religious dogmatisms. Rather than set out a system of ideas, Simone Weil uses her philosophical reflections to show how to think about work and oppression, freedom and the good, necessity (...)
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  25. Peter Verhezen (2010). Giving Voice in a Culture of Silence. From a Culture of Compliance to a Culture of Integrity. Journal of Business Ethics 96 (2):187 - 206.score: 18.0
    This article argues that attempting to overcome moral silence in organizations will require management to move beyond a compliance-oriented organizational culture toward a culture based on integrity. Such cultural change is part of good corporate governance that aims to steer an organization to enhance creativity and moral excellence, and thus organizational value. Governance mechanisms can be either formal or informal. Formal codes and other internal formal regulations that emphasize compliance are necessary, although informal mechanisms that are based on (...)
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  26. Kenneth E. Goodpaster (2007). Conscience and Corporate Culture. Blackwell Pub..score: 18.0
    Conscience and Corporate Culture advances the constructive dialogue on a moral conscience for corporations. Written for educators in the field of business ethics and practicing corporate executives, the book serves as a platform on a subject profoundly difficult and timely. Written from the unique vantage point of an author who is a philosopher, professor of business administration, and a corporate consultant A vital resource for both educators in the field of business ethics and practicing corporate executives Forwards the constructive (...)
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  27. Julian Thomas (1996). Time, Culture, and Identity: An Interpretative Archaeology. Routledge.score: 18.0
    This groundbreaking work considers one of the central themes of archaeology, time, which until recently has been taken for granted. It considers how time is used and perceived by archaeology and also how time influences the construction of identities. The book presents case studies, eg, transition from hunter gather to farming in early Neolithic, to examine temporality and identity. Drawing upon the work of Martin Heidegger, Thomas develops a way of writing about the past in which time is seenm as (...)
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  28. Muel Kaptein (2009). Ethics Programs and Ethical Culture: A Next Step in Unraveling Their Multi-Faceted Relationship. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):261 - 281.score: 18.0
    One of the main objectives of an ethics program is to improve the ethical culture of an organization. To date, empirical research treats at least one of these concepts as a one-dimensional construct. This paper demonstrates that by conceptualizing both constructs as multi-dimensional, a more in-depth understanding of the relationship between the two concepts can be achieved. Through the employment of the Corporate Ethical Virtues Model, eight dimensions of ethical culture are distinguished. Nine components of an ethics program (...)
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  29. Nancy Sherman (2009). The Fate of a Warrior Culture. Philosophical Studies 144 (1):71 - 80.score: 18.0
    Jonathan Lear in Radical Hope tackles the idea of cultural devastation, in the specific case of the Crow Indians. What do we mean by “annihilation” of a culture? The moral point of view that he imagines as he reconstructs the eve and aftermath of this annihilation is not second personal, of obligation, but first personal, in the collective and singular, as told by the Crows, with Lear as “analyst.” Radical Hope is a study of representative character of a people—of (...)
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  30. Karen Fog Olwig & Kirsten Hastrup (eds.) (1997). Siting Culture: The Shifting Anthropological Object. Routledge.score: 18.0
    The idea of culture has been subject to critical debate in anthropology during the past decade as the result of a shift in emphasis from the bounded local culture to transnational cultural flows. But at the very same time that cultural mobility is being emphasized by anthropologists, the people they study are recasting culture as a place of belonging as they construct local identities. Siting Culture argues that it is only through rich ethnographic studies that anthropologists (...)
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  31. Gary R. Weaver (2001). Ethics Programs in Global Businesses: Culture's Role in Managing Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (1):3 - 15.score: 18.0
    Even if there were widespread cross-cultural agreement on the normative issues of business ethics, corporate ethics management initiatives (e.g., codes of conduct, ethics telephone lines, ethics offices) which are appropriate in one cultural setting still could fail to mesh with the management practices and cultural characteristics of a different setting. By uncritically adopting widely promoted American practices for managing corporate ethics, multinational businesses risk failure in pursuing the ostensible goals of corporate ethics initiatives. Pursuing shared ethical goals by means of (...)
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  32. Christian Lotz (2005). From Nature to Culture? Diogenes and Philosophical Anthropology. Human Studies 28 (1):41 - 56.score: 18.0
    This essay is concerned with the central issue of philosophical anthropology: the relation between nature and culture. Although Rousseau was the first thinker to introduce this topic within the modern discourse of philosophy and the cultural sciences, it has its origin in Diogenes the Cynic, who was a disciple of Socrates. In my essay I (1) historically introduce a few aspects of philosophical anthropology, (2) deal with the nature–culture exchange, as introduced in Kant, then I (3) relate this (...)
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  33. Paul Coates (1994). Film at the Intersection of High and Mass Culture. Cambridge University Press.score: 18.0
    At the Intersection of High and Mass Culture analyses the contradictions and interaction between high and low art, with particular reference to Hollywood and European cinema. Written in the essayist, speculative tradition of Walter Benjamin and Theodore Adorno, this study also includes analyses of several key films of the 1980s. Tracing the boundaries of such genres as film noir, science fiction and melodrama, it demonstrates how these genres were radically expanded by such filmmakers as Neil Jordan, Chris Merker and (...)
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  34. Robert W. Witkin (2003). Adorno on Popular Culture. Routledge.score: 18.0
    In the decades since his death, Adorno's thinking has lost none of its capacity to unsettle the settled, and has proved hugely influential in social and cultural thought. To most people, the entertainment provided by television, radio, film, newspapers, astrology charts and CD players seem harmless enough. For Adorno, however, the culture industry that produces them is ultimately toxic in its effect on the social process. Here, Robert Witkin unpacks Adorno's notoriously difficult critique of popular culture in an (...)
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  35. Christopher Meyers (2004). Institutional Culture and Individual Behavior: Creating an Ethical Environment. Science and Engineering Ethics 10 (2):269-276.score: 18.0
    Much of the work in professional ethics sees ethical problems as resulting from ethical ignorance, ethical failure or evil intent. While this approach gets at real and valid concerns, it does not capture the whole story because it does not take into account the underlying professional or institutional culture in which moral decision making is imbedded. My argument in this paper is that this culture plays a powerful and sometimes determinant role in establishing the nature of the ethical (...)
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  36. Nicola Pless & Thomas Maak (2004). Building an Inclusive Diversity Culture: Principles, Processes and Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):129 - 147.score: 18.0
    In management theory and business practice, the dealing with diversity, especially a diverse workforce, has played a prominent role in recent years. In a globalizing economy companies recognized potential benefits of a multicultural workforce and tried to create more inclusive work environments. However, many organizations have been disappointed with the results they have achieved in their efforts to meet the diversity challenge [Cox: 2001, Creating the Multicultural Organization (Jossey-Bass, San Francisco)]. We see the reason for this in the fact that (...)
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  37. Molly Brigid Flynn (2009). The Living Body as the Origin of Culture: What the Shift in Husserl's Notion of “Expression” Tells Us About Cultural Objects. [REVIEW] Husserl Studies 25 (1):57-79.score: 18.0
    Husserl’s philosophy of culture relies upon a person’s body being expressive of the person’s spirit, but Husserl’s analysis of expression in Logical Investigations is inadequate to explain this bodily expressiveness. This paper explains how Husserl’s use of “expression” shifts from LI to Ideas II and argues that this shift is explained by Husserl’s increased understanding of the pervasiveness of sense in subjective life and his increased appreciation for the unity of the person. I show how these two developments allow (...)
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  38. A. A. Tavakoli, John P. Keenan & B. Cranjak-Karanovic (2003). Culture and Whistleblowing an Empirical Study of Croatian and United States Managers Utilizing Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions. Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):49 - 64.score: 18.0
    Leaders and managers of today''s multinational corporations face a plethora of problems and issues directly attributable to the fact that they are operating in an international context. With work-sites, plants and/or customers based in another country, or even several countries, representing a vast spectrum of cultural differences, international trade and offshore operations, coupled with increased globalisation in respect to political, social and economic realities, contribute to new dilemmas that these leaders must deal with. Not the least of these being a (...)
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  39. Cathy Driscoll & Margaret McKee (2007). Restorying a Culture of Ethical and Spiritual Values: A Role for Leader Storytelling. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 73 (2):205 - 217.score: 18.0
    In this paper, we outline some of the connections between the literatures of organizational storytelling, spirituality in the workplace, organizational culture, and authentic leadership. We suggest that leader storytelling that integrates a moral and spiritual component can transform an organizational culture so members of the organization begin to feel connected to a larger community and a higher purpose. We specifically discuss how leader role modeling in authentic storytelling is essential in developing an ethically and spiritually based organizational (...). However, we also acknowledge a potential dark side to leader storytelling. Implications for authentic storytelling research and practice are discussed. (shrink)
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  40. Md Zabid Rashid & Saidatul Ibrahim (2008). The Effect of Culture and Religiosity on Business Ethics: A Cross-Cultural Comparison. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):907 - 917.score: 18.0
    This article examined the effect of culture and religiosity on perceptions of business ethics among students in a tertiary institution in Malaysia. A structured questionnaire was developed with scenarios on various aspects of business ethics, and self-administered to the students in the business studies program. The results from 767 respondents showed that there were significant differences among the Malays, Chinese, and Indian students on seven scenarios namely selling hazardous products, misleading instructions, selling defective products, padding expense account, taking sick (...)
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  41. John Storey (2008). Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: An Introduction. Pearson Longman.score: 18.0
    In this 4th edition of his successful Cultural Theory and Popular Culture: An Introduction, John Storey has extensively revised the text throughout.
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  42. Edward M. Swiderski (1998). Culture, Contexts, and Directions in Russian Post-Soviet Philosophy. Studies in East European Thought 50 (4):283-328.score: 18.0
    The author examines, historically and theoretically, issues related to the state and current tendencies of post-Soviet Russian philosophy. The accent falls on the meta-philosophical question, what is philosophy?, or as the Russians often say, what is philosophizing?. In the Russian case, this question has presently to be handled in a cultural context ridden with a sense of discontinuity following the Soviet collapse. The author sketches some concepts intended to shed light on the nature of the relation between a philosophical (...) and the wider socio-cultural context in which it is embedded. The model is applied to the case of post-Soviet philosophy in order to see if and to what extent the logic of Soviet philosophizing and its place in the Soviet socio-cultural order has affected current philosophical tendencies in Russia, above all at the meta-philosophical level. The author concludes with a summary and commentary of the views of A.S. Akhiezer. (shrink)
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  43. Paul Tillich (1990). Writings in the Philosophy of Culture. Evangelisches Verlagswerk.score: 18.0
    Paul Tillich's Theology of Culture Michael Palmer In this volume of the Hauptwerke Tillich deals with a great variety of topics. We find here essays on the ...
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  44. Manuel Carlos Vallejo (2008). Is the Culture of Family Firms Really Different? A Value-Based Model for its Survival Through Generations. Journal of Business Ethics 81 (2):261 - 279.score: 18.0
    The current work represents a piece of research on the family firm of the semasiological, interpretive or culture creation type. In it we carry out a comparative analysis of the organizational culture of this type of firm along with firms not considered to be family firms, using as theoretical framework generally accepted theories in business administration, such as the systems, neoinstitutional, transformational leadership, and social identity theories. Our findings confirm the existence of certain elements of culture, especially (...)
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  45. Lyn Cowan (2002). Tracking the White Rabbit: A Subversive View of Modern Culture. Brunner-Routledge.score: 18.0
    Like Alice following the white rabbit into a topsy-turvy world where the laws of logic don't apply, subversive thinking unearths the mysteries behind the mundane. Tracking the White Rabbit is a fascinating, original work that invites us to use depth psychology to challenge our deepest assumptions about world politics, theology, social norms, everyday speech, and usual ideas of sex and emotion. Raised in an environment of McCarthyism and rock-and-roll, Jungian analyst Lyn Cowan shows readers-through provocative essays on memory and homosexuality, (...)
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  46. Laura B. Delind & Jim Bingen* (2008). Place and Civic Culture: Re-Thinking the Context for Local Agriculture. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (2):127-151.score: 18.0
    This article considers the qualitative concept of place – what it means, how it feels, how it is expressed, and how it is managed across time and space as (1) the appropriate context within which to study and promote local agriculture and (2) the locus of relationships, both cultural and political, that prefigure a local civic culture. It argues that civic as a description of local food and farming is conceptually and practically shallow in the absence of our ability (...)
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  47. Mojca Duh, Jernej Belak & Borut Milfelner (2010). Core Values, Culture and Ethical Climate as Constitutional Elements of Ethical Behaviour: Exploring Differences Between Family and Non-Family Enterprises. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 97 (3):473 - 489.score: 18.0
    The research presented in this article aims to contribute both quantitatively and qualitatively to the discussion on family versus non-family businesses' differences in ethical core values, culture and ethical climate. The purpose of our article is to better understand the association between the degree of involvement of a family in an enterprise and its influence on the enterprise's core values, culture and ethical climate as the constitutional elements of enterprise ethical behaviour. The research indicates that family as well (...)
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  48. Kam-hon Lee, Dennis P. McCann & MaryAnn Ching (2003). Christ and Business Culture: A Study of Christian Executives in Hong Kong. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):103 - 110.score: 18.0
    Does Christian faith matter in business? If so, how does it affect the way executives handle managerial issues, especially the ones that are ethically controversial? This paper reports a study of Chinese Christian executives in Hong Kong. The researchers followed an approach known as the Critical Incident Technique and conducted in-depth interviews with 119 Chinese Christian executives over a two year period from 1999 to 2001. Each interview covered four broad areas consisting of the interviewee''s description of his or (...)
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  49. Luke Rendell & Hal Whitehead (2001). Culture in Whales and Dolphins. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):309-324.score: 18.0
    Studies of animal culture have not normally included a consideration of cetaceans. However, with several long-term field studies now maturing, this situation should change. Animal culture is generally studied by either investigating transmission mechanisms experimentally, or observing patterns of behavioural variation in wild populations that cannot be explained by either genetic or environmental factors. Taking this second, ethnographic, approach, there is good evidence for cultural transmission in several cetacean species. However, only the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops) has been shown (...)
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  50. Patricia Casey Douglas, Ronald A. Davidson & Bill N. Schwartz (2001). The Effect of Organizational Culture and Ethical Orientation on Accountants' Ethical Judgments. Journal of Business Ethics 34 (2):101 - 121.score: 18.0
    This paper examines the relationship between organizational ethical culture in two large international CPA firms, auditors'' personal values and the ethical orientation that those values dictate, and judgments in ethical dilemmas typical of those that accountants face. Using an experimental task consisting of multiple judgments designed to vary in "moral intensity" (Jones, 1991), and unique as well as tried-and-true approaches to variable measurements, this study examined the judgments of more than three hundred participants in our study. ANCOVA and path (...)
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