Search results for 'Culture Congresses' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  15
    Sophie McGrath (2008). The Adaptation of the Roman Catholic Tradition of Christianity to White Australian Culture: The Australasian Catholic Congresses of 1900, 1904 and 1909. [REVIEW] The Australasian Catholic Record 85 (1):37.
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  2.  12
    Sonu Shamdasani & Michael Münchow (eds.) (1994). Speculations After Freud: Psychoanalysis, Philosophy, and Culture. Routledge.
    Speculations After Freud confronts the dilemmas of contemporary psychoanalysis by bringing together some of the most influential and best known writers on psychoanalysis and culture. These advocates and critics of psychoanalysis, both institutional and theoretical, reveal the powerful role psychoanalytic speculation plays in all areas of culture. Psychoanalysis has played a pivotal role in challenging the modernist notions of rationality and selfhood. It offers an alternative means of examining how identity is engendered, yet its identity has come into (...)
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  3. Venant Cauchy (ed.) (1988). Philosophie Et Culture: Actes Du Xviie Congrès Mondial De Philosophie. Editions Montmorency.
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  4. Kjell S. Johannessen & Tore Nordenstam (eds.) (1996). Wittgenstein and the Philosophy of Culture: Proceedings of the 18th International Wittgenstein Symposium, 13th to 20th August 1995, Kirchberg Am Wechsel (Austria). [REVIEW] Hölder-Pichler-Tempsky.
     
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  5. Michael Krausz & Richard Shusterman (eds.) (1999). Interpretation, Relativism, and the Metaphysics of Culture: Themes in the Philosophy of Joseph Margolis. Humanity Books.
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  6. József Lukács & Ferenc Tőkei (eds.) (1983). Philosophy and Culture: Studies From Hungary Published on the Occasion of the 17th World Congress of Philosophy. Akadémiai Kiadó.
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  7. Merry Bullock (ed.) (1991). The Development of Intentional Action: Cognitive, Motivational, and Interactive Processes. Karger.
  8. James Donald (ed.) (1991). Psychoanalysis and Cultural Theory: Thresholds. St. Martin's Press.
  9. V. P. Fetisov (ed.) (2006). Sovremennai͡a Rossii͡a: Zabvenie Absoli͡utov: Materialy Mezhvuzovskoĭ Nauchnoĭ Konferent͡sii, 12-13 Mai͡a 2006 Goda. Voronezhskai͡a Gos. Lesotekhn. Akademii͡a.
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  10. H. Odera Oruka & D. A. Masolo (eds.) (1983). Philosophy and Cultures: Proceedings of 2nd Afro-Asian Philosophy Conference, Nairobi, October/November 1981. Bookwise Ltd..
     
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  11. Józef Życiński (ed.) (1980). The Human Person and Philosophy in the Contemporary World: Proceedings of the Meeting of the World Union of Catholic Philosophical Societies, Cracow, 23-25 August 1978. [REVIEW] Pontifical Faculty of Theology.
     
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  12.  4
    Brian Bocking (2013). Flagging Up Buddhism: Charles Pfoundes (Omoie Tetzunostzuke) Among the International Congresses and Expositions, 1893–1905. Contemporary Buddhism 14 (1):17-37.
    Charles James William Pfoundes (1840?1907), a young emigrant from Southeast Ireland, spent most of his adult life in Japan, received a Japanese name ?Omoie Tetzunostzuke?, first embraced and then turned against Theosophy and, from 1893, was ordained in several Japanese Buddhist traditions. Lacking independent means but educated, intellectually curious, entrepreneurial, fluent in Japanese and with a keen interest in Asian culture, Pfoundes subsisted as a cultural intermediary, explaining Japan and Asia to both Japanese and foreign audiences and actively seeking (...)
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  13.  21
    Peter Nosco (ed.) (1997). Confucianism and Tokugawa Culture. University of Hawai'i Press.
    ONE INTRODUCTION: NEO-CONFUCIANISM AND TOKUGAWA DISCOURSE BY PETER NOSCO Modern scholarship on the intellectual history of the Tokugawa period ...
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  14. Karl-Otto Apel (1990). What Right Does Ethics Have?: Public Philosophy in a Pluralistic Culture. Vu University Press.
    The author reviews recent books by Alasdair MacIntyre and Garrett Barden that critique the impulse to foundational theory and transhistorical argumentation in moral theory; these arguments are then set in relation to books by Franklin Gamwell and Karl-Otto Apel that seek, in new ways, to defend that impulse. Although far more sympathetic to the latter perspective, the author maintains that all four of these second-order theoretical discussions lack an appropriate understanding of and engagement with the post-Enlightenment tradition of moral theorizing.
     
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  15. Andreas Burnier (ed.) (1975). Science Between Culture and Counter-Culture. Dekker & Van De Vegt.
     
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  16.  6
    Rocco Caporale & Antonio Grumelli (eds.) (1971). The Culture of Unbelief. Berkeley,University of California Press.
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  17. Michel Cazenave (ed.) (1984). Science and Consciousness: Two Views of the Universe: Edited Proceedings of the France-Culture and Radio-France Colloquium, Cordoba, Spain. Pergamon Press.
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  18. Algirdas Julien Greimas (ed.) (1970). Sign, Language, Culture. The Hague,Mouton.
     
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  19. Vittorio Mathieu & Paolo Rossi (eds.) (1979). Scientific Culture in the Contemporary World. Scientia.
     
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  20. Ram Chandra Pandeya & Siddheswar Rameshwar Bhatt (eds.) (1976). Knowledge, Culture, and Value: Papers Presented in Plenary Sessions, Panel Discussions, and Sectional Meetings of World Philosophy Conference, Golden Jubilee Session of the Indian Philosophical Congress, December 28, 1975 to January 3, 1976. [REVIEW] Motilal Banarsidass.
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  21.  52
    Gillian Robinson & John F. Rundell (eds.) (1994). Rethinking Imagination: Culture and Creativity. Routledge.
    Discusses the different ways in which the concept of imagination has been construed, and provides fascinating glimpses of the role of imagination in the creation and management of Modernity.
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  22. Henry John Steffens & H. N. Muller (eds.) (1974). Science, Technology, and Culture. New York,Ams Press.
  23.  11
    Arnold Groh (2016). Culture, Language and Thought: Field Studies on Colour Concepts. Journal of Cognition and Culture 16:83–106.
    In a series of studies the assumption of a lack of colour concepts in indigenous societies, as proposed by Berlin & Kay (1969) and others, was examined. The research took place in the form of minimally invasive field encounters with indigenous subjects in South East Asia and in India, as well as in West, Central, and South Africa. Subjects were screened for colour blindness with Ishihara- and Pflüger-Trident-Test. Standardised colour tablets had to be designated in the indigenous languages; these terms (...)
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  24.  9
    Gary Hatfield (2013). Introduction: The Evolution of Mind, Brain, and Culture. In Gary Hatfield & Holly Pittman (eds.), Evolution of Mind, Brain, and Culture. University of Pennsylvania Press 1-44.
    This introductory chapter surveys some basic findings on primate evolution and the evolution of mind; examines socially transmitted traditions in relation to the concept of culture; recounts the sources of evidence regarding the evolution of mind and culture; charts the history of evolutionary approaches to mind and behavior since Darwin; reviews several prominent theoretical syntheses concerning the evolution of the human mind and behavior; and, along the way, introduces the specific questions examined in the individual chapters.
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  25.  2
    Olatunji A. Oyeshile (2015). Modernity, Islam and an African Culture. Filosofia Theoretica: Journal of African Philosophy, Culture and Religions 4 (2):2-18.
    The human quest for the meaning of life is an unending one marked by undulating landscapes. In order to confront the flux of experience generated by this quest for meaning, the human embraces science, morality, politics and religion. Religion is said to provide the basis for transcendental values which give humans succour after the physical and material struggles have ended. At the same time, religion also uses the observable social world as the starting point for the embrace of transcendental values. (...)
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  26.  46
    Muel Kaptein (2011). From Inaction to External Whistleblowing: The Influence of the Ethical Culture of Organizations on Employee Responses to Observed Wrongdoing. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 98 (3):513 - 530.
    Putting measures in place to prevent wrongdoing in organizations is important, but detecting and correcting wrongdoing are also vital. Employees who detect wrongdoing should, therefore, be encouraged to respond in a manner that supports corrective action. This article examines the influence of the ethical culture of organizations on employee responses to observed wrongdoing. Different dimensions of ethical culture are related to different types of intended responses. The findings show that several dimensions of ethical culture were negatively related (...)
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  27.  21
    Merlin Donald (1993). Précis of Origins of the Modern Mind: Three Stages in the Evolution of Culture and Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):737-748.
    This bold and brilliant book asks the ultimate question of the life sciences: How did the human mind acquire its incomparable power? In seeking the answer, Merlin Donald traces the evolution of human culture and cognition from primitive apes to the era of artificial intelligence, and presents an original theory of how the human mind evolved from its presymbolic form. In the emergence of modern human culture, Donald proposes, there were three radical transitions. During the first, our bipedal (...)
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  28.  46
    Patricia Casey Douglas, Ronald A. Davidson & Bill N. Schwartz (2001). The Effect of Organizational Culture and Ethical Orientation on Accountants' Ethical Judgments. Journal of Business Ethics 34 (2):101 - 121.
    This paper examines the relationship between organizational ethical culture in two large international CPA firms, auditors'' personal values and the ethical orientation that those values dictate, and judgments in ethical dilemmas typical of those that accountants face. Using an experimental task consisting of multiple judgments designed to vary in "moral intensity" (Jones, 1991), and unique as well as tried-and-true approaches to variable measurements, this study examined the judgments of more than three hundred participants in our study. ANCOVA and path (...)
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  29.  24
    Breda Sweeney, Don Arnold & Bernard Pierce (2010). The Impact of Perceived Ethical Culture of the Firm and Demographic Variables on Auditors' Ethical Evaluation and Intention to Act Decisions. Journal of Business Ethics 93 (4):531 - 551.
    This study examined the impact of perceived ethical culture of the firm and selected demographic variables on auditors' ethical evaluation of, and intention to engage in, various time pressure-induced dysfunctional behaviours. Four audit cases and questionnaires were distributed to experienced pre-manager level auditors in Ireland and the U. S. The findings revealed that while perceived unethical pressure to engage in dysfunctional behaviours and unethical tone at the top were significant in forming an ethical evaluation, only perceived unethical pressure had (...)
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  30. Rolf Petri (2012). The Idea of Culture and the History of Emotions. Historein 12:21-37.
    The essay operates an itemisation of the three main streams in the history of emotions: the history of individual emotions, the study of the role that emotions have in historical processes, and the reflection on the influence of emotions on history writing. The second part of the article is devoted to the methodological and theoretical status of the study of past emotions. It highlights how many studies in the history of emotions remain heavily conditioned by an idea of culture (...)
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  31.  29
    Yvette P. Lopez, Paula L. Rechner & Julie B. Olson-Buchanan (2005). Shaping Ethical Perceptions: An Empirical Assessment of the Influence of Business Education, Culture, and Demographic Factors. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 60 (4):341 - 358.
    Recent events at Enron, K-Mart, Adelphia, and Tyson would seem to suggest that managers are still experiencing ethical lapses. These lapses are somewhat surprising and disappointing given the heightened focus on ethical considerations within business contexts during the past decade. This study is designed, therefore, to increase our understanding of the forces that shape ethical perceptions by considering the effects of business school education as well as a number of other individual-level factors (such as intra-national culture, area of specialization (...)
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  32.  57
    Muel Kaptein (2009). Ethics Programs and Ethical Culture: A Next Step in Unraveling Their Multi-Faceted Relationship. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 89 (2):261 - 281.
    One of the main objectives of an ethics program is to improve the ethical culture of an organization. To date, empirical research treats at least one of these concepts as a one-dimensional construct. This paper demonstrates that by conceptualizing both constructs as multi-dimensional, a more in-depth understanding of the relationship between the two concepts can be achieved. Through the employment of the Corporate Ethical Virtues Model, eight dimensions of ethical culture are distinguished. Nine components of an ethics program (...)
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  33.  41
    Donald F. Arnold, Richard A. Bernardi, Presha E. Neidermeyer & Josef Schmee (2007). The Effect of Country and Culture on Perceptions of Appropriate Ethical Actions Prescribed by Codes of Conduct: A Western European Perspective Among Accountants. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 70 (4):327 - 340.
    Recognizing the growing interdependence of the European Union and the importance of codes of conduct in companies’ operations, this research examines the effect of a country’s culture on the implementation of a code of conduct in a European context. We examine whether the perceptions of an activity’s ethicality relates to elements found in company codes of conduct vary by country or according to Hofstede’s (1980, Culture’s Consequences (Sage Publications, Beverly Hills, CA)) cultural constructs of: Uncertainty Avoidance, Masculinity/Femininity, Individualism, (...)
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  34.  32
    Aileen Smith & Evelyn C. Hume (2005). Linking Culture and Ethics: A Comparison of Accountants' Ethical Belief Systems in the Individualism/Collectivism and Power Distance Contexts. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 62 (3):209 - 220.
    This study uses accounting professionals from an international setting to test the individualism and power distance cultural dimensions developed by Hofstede [Culture’s Consequences (Sage Publications, Beverly Hills, CA) 1980]. Six countries, which appropriately represented high and low values on the Hofstede dimensions, were chosen for the survey of ethical beliefs. Respondents (n = 249) from the six countries were requested to supply their agreement/disagreement with eight questionable behaviors associated with the work environment. Each of these behaviors contained an individualism (...)
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  35.  77
    Jerome Barkow, Leda Cosmides & John Tooby (eds.) (1992). The Adapted Mind: Evolutionary Psychology and the Generation of Culture. Oxford University Press.
    Second, this collection of cognitive programs evolved in the Pleistocene to solve the adaptive problems regularly faced by our hunter-gatherer ancestors-...
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  36. Kenneth E. Goodpaster (2007). Conscience and Corporate Culture. Blackwell Pub..
    Conscience and Corporate Culture advances the constructive dialogue on a moral conscience for corporations. Written for educators in the field of business ethics and practicing corporate executives, the book serves as a platform on a subject profoundly difficult and timely. Written from the unique vantage point of an author who is a philosopher, professor of business administration, and a corporate consultant A vital resource for both educators in the field of business ethics and practicing corporate executives Forwards the constructive (...)
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  37.  13
    James W. Westerman, Rafik I. Beekun, Yvonne Stedham & Jeanne Yamamura (2007). Peers Versus National Culture: An Analysis of Antecedents to Ethical Decision-Making. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 75 (3):239 - 252.
    Given the recent ethics scandals in the United States, there has been a renewed focus on understanding the antecedents to ethical decision-making in the research literature. Since ethical norms and standards of behavior are not universally consistent, an individual’s choice of referent may exert a large influence on his/her ethical decision-making. This study used a social identity theory lens to empirically examine the relative influence of the macro- and micro-level variables of national culture and peers on an individual’s intention (...)
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  38. Pietro Gori & Paolo Stellino (2015). Introductory Study. Nietzsche on Culture and Subjectivity. Enrahonar: Quaderns de Filosofía 2 (1):11-23.
    Nietzsche’s timeliness is patent in the renewed enthusiasm with which scholars in both the continental and analytic traditions have approached his works in recent years. Along with other topics, attention has been particularly directed towards two important issues: Nietzsche’s analysis, critique, and genealogy of culture, and his stance on subjectivity. In this introductory study we shall provide a brief outline of both these topics. As will be shown, they play a pivotal role in Nietzsche’s thought, and the link that (...)
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  39.  66
    Nicola Pless & Thomas Maak (2004). Building an Inclusive Diversity Culture: Principles, Processes and Practice. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):129 - 147.
    In management theory and business practice, the dealing with diversity, especially a diverse workforce, has played a prominent role in recent years. In a globalizing economy companies recognized potential benefits of a multicultural workforce and tried to create more inclusive work environments. However, many organizations have been disappointed with the results they have achieved in their efforts to meet the diversity challenge [Cox: 2001, Creating the Multicultural Organization (Jossey-Bass, San Francisco)]. We see the reason for this in the fact that (...)
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  40.  26
    Bennett G. Galef (1992). The Question of Animal Culture. Human Nature 3 (2):157-178.
    In this paper I consider whether traditional behaviors of animals, like traditions of humans, are transmitted by imitation learning. Review of the literature on problem solving by captive primates, and detailed consideration of two widely cited instances of purported learning by imitation and of culture in free-living primates (sweet-potato washing by Japanese macaques and termite fishing by chimpanzees), suggests that nonhuman primates do not learn to solve problems by imitation. It may, therefore, be misleading to treat animal traditions and (...)
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  41.  10
    Mari Huhtala, Taru Feldt, Katriina Hyvönen & Saija Mauno (2013). Ethical Organisational Culture as a Context for Managers' Personal Work Goals. Journal of Business Ethics 114 (2):265-282.
    The aims of this study were to investigate what kinds of personal work goals managers have and whether ethical organisational culture is related to these goals. The sample consisted of 811 Finnish managers from different organisations, in middle and upper management levels, aged 25–68 years. Eight work-related goal content categories were found based on the managers self-reported goals: (1) organisational goals (35.4 %), (2) competence goals (26.1 %), (3) well-being goals (12.1 %), (4) career-ending goals (7.3 %), (5) progression (...)
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  42.  29
    Corey M. Abramson (2012). From “Either-Or” to “When and How”: A Context-Dependent Model of Culture in Action. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 42 (2):155-180.
    In this article, I outline a framework for the sociological study of culture that connects three intertwined elements of human culture and demonstrates the concrete contexts under which each most critically influences actions and their subsequent outcomes. In contrast to models that cast motivations, resources, and meanings as competing explanations of how culture affects action, I argue that these are fundamental constituent elements of culture that are inseparable, interdependent, and simultaneously operative. Which element provides the strongest (...)
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  43.  22
    Mari Huhtala, Taru Feldt, Anna-Maija Lämsä, Saija Mauno & Ulla Kinnunen (2011). Does the Ethical Culture of Organisations Promote Managers' Occupational Well-Being? Investigating Indirect Links Via Ethical Strain. Journal of Business Ethics 101 (2):231-247.
    The present study had two major aims: first, to examine the construct validity of the Finnish 58-item Corporate Ethical Virtues scale (CEV; Kaptein in J Org Behav 29:923–947, 2008) and second, to examine whether the associations between managers’ perceptions of ethical organisational culture and their occupational well-being (emotional exhaustion and work engagement) are indirectly linked by ethical strain, i.e. the tension which arises from the difference in the ethical values of the individual and the organisation he or she works (...)
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  44. Sylvia Tamale (2008). The Right to Culture and the Culture of Rights: A Critical Perspective on Women's Sexual Rights in Africa. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 16 (1):47-69.
    The opposition of ‘culture’ and ‘rights’ is not uncommon in feminist legal discourse. This article argues that such an approach is fraught with danger as it creates an extremely restrictive framework within which African women can challenge domination; it limits our strategic interventions for transforming society and essentially plays into the hands of those seeking to perpetuate and solidify the existing structures of patriarchy. Drawing examples from a parallel research on Gender, Law and Sexuality, I propose that a more (...)
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  45. Keqian Xu (2009). 儒家思想与中国传统文化的价值优先观(Confucianism and the Value Priority in Traditional Chinese Culture). 孔子研究 Confucius Studies 2009 (2):22-27.
    Confucianism has a deep influence on the opinion of value priority in traditional Chinese culture, which consider the value of morality prior to that of utility; the value of moral merit prior to that of intelligent; the value of group prior to that of individuals; the value of peace and safety prior to that of freedom and liberty; the value of harmony prior to that of conflict. This kind of value priority has performed very important and positive functions in (...)
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  46.  20
    Mark C. Taylor (2001). The Moment of Complexity: Emerging Network Culture. University of Chicago Press.
    " The Moment of Complexity is a profoundly original work. In remarkable and insightful ways, Mark Taylor traces an entirely new way to view the evolution of our culture, detailing how information theory and the scientific concept of complexity can be used to understand recent developments in the arts and humanities. This book will ultimately be seen as a classic."-John L. Casti, Santa Fe Institute, author of Godel: A Life of Logic, the Mind, and Mathematics The science of complexity (...)
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  47.  31
    A. A. Tavakoli, John P. Keenan & B. Cranjak-Karanovic (2003). Culture and Whistleblowing an Empirical Study of Croatian and United States Managers Utilizing Hofstede's Cultural Dimensions. Journal of Business Ethics 43 (1-2):49 - 64.
    Leaders and managers of today''s multinational corporations face a plethora of problems and issues directly attributable to the fact that they are operating in an international context. With work-sites, plants and/or customers based in another country, or even several countries, representing a vast spectrum of cultural differences, international trade and offshore operations, coupled with increased globalisation in respect to political, social and economic realities, contribute to new dilemmas that these leaders must deal with. Not the least of these being a (...)
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  48.  49
    Gary R. Weaver (2001). Ethics Programs in Global Businesses: Culture's Role in Managing Ethics. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 30 (1):3 - 15.
    Even if there were widespread cross-cultural agreement on the normative issues of business ethics, corporate ethics management initiatives (e.g., codes of conduct, ethics telephone lines, ethics offices) which are appropriate in one cultural setting still could fail to mesh with the management practices and cultural characteristics of a different setting. By uncritically adopting widely promoted American practices for managing corporate ethics, multinational businesses risk failure in pursuing the ostensible goals of corporate ethics initiatives. Pursuing shared ethical goals by means of (...)
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  49.  18
    Larry Stapleton (2013). Zarathustra and Beyond: Exploring Culture and Values Online. [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (1):95-105.
    Illusions of control and fantasies of power are important themes in human history and culture. The first objective of this paper is to explore Zarathustran fantasies in the information society, and our dreams of God-like control and mastery over ourselves and the Universe. This paper does not try to be faithful to Nietzschean philosophical concepts of Zarathustra, but instead explore cultural themes, which can be related to a mythology of God-like control and omniscient perception. It draws together strands from (...)
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  50.  74
    Brian W. Kulik (2005). Agency Theory, Reasoning and Culture at Enron: In Search of a Solution. Journal of Business Ethics 59 (4):347 - 360.
    Applying evidence from recently available public information on Enron, I defined Enron’s culture as one rooted in agency theory by asserting that Enron’s members were predominantly agency-reasoning individuals. I then identified conditions present at Enron’s collapse: a strong agency culture with collectively non-compliant norms, a munificent rare-failure environment, and new hires with little business ethics training. Turning to four possible antidotes (selection, objectivist integrity, integrity capacity, and stewardship reasoning) to an agency culture under these conditions, I argued (...)
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