19 found
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  1. John Cutting (2001). On Kimura's Ecrits de psychopathologie phenomenologique. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (4):337-338.
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  2.  70
    J. Cutting (2011). Max Scheler's Metaphysics. Appraisal 8 (3).
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  3.  4
    James E. Cutting & Lynn T. Kozlowski (1977). Recognizing Friends by Their Walk: Gait Perception Without Familiarity Cues. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 9 (5):353-356.
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  4.  22
    John Cutting (2009). Scheler, Phenomenology, and Psychopathology. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (2):143-159.
  5.  1
    James E. Cutting (1981). Six Tenets for Event Perception. Cognition 10 (1-3):71-78.
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  6.  4
    James Cutting & Catalina Iricinschi (2015). Re‐Presentations of Space in Hollywood Movies: An Event‐Indexing Analysis. Cognitive Science 39 (2):434-456.
    Popular movies present chunk-like events that promote episodic, serial updating of viewers’ representations of the ongoing narrative. Event-indexing theory would suggest that the beginnings of new scenes trigger these updates, which in turn require more cognitive processing. Typically, a new movie event is signaled by an establishing shot, one providing more background information and a longer look than the average shot. Our analysis of 24 films reconfirms this. More important, we show that, when returning to a previously shown location, the (...)
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  7. K. Bock, K. M. Eberhard & J. C. Cutting (1992). Controlling Number Agreement on Verbs and Anaphors. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 30 (6):441-441.
     
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  8.  6
    James E. Cutting (2008). Asynchronous Neural Integration: Compensation or Computational Tolerance and Skill Acquisition? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):204-205.
    Nijhawan argues that neural compensation is necessary to account for couplings of perception and action. Although perhaps true in some cases, computational tolerance for asynchronously arriving continuous information is of more importance. Moreover, some of the everyday venues Nijhawan uses to argue for the relevance of prediction and compensation can be better ascribed to skill.
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  9.  13
    James E. Cutting (2008). Criteria for Basic Tastes and Other Sensory Primaries. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (1):77-78.
    Primary, or basic, colors have been discussed for centuries. Over time, three criteria have emerged on their behalf: (a) their physical mixture yielding all other spectral colors, (b) the physiological attunement of receptors or pathways to particular wavelengths, and (c) the etymological history of the color term. These criteria can be applied usefully to taste to clarify issues.
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  10. James E. Cutting (1982). Blowing in the Wind: Perceiving Structure in Trees and Bushes. Cognition 12 (1):25-44.
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  11.  1
    James E. Cutting & Nancy J. Schatz (1976). On the Relationship Between Intercategory and Intracategory Semantic Structure. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 8 (5):406-408.
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  12.  2
    J. Cutting (2013). The Psychiatric Concept of Causation: Philosophical and Semiotic Contributions. Appraisal 9 (3).
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  13.  1
    John Cutting (2009). Psychopathologists and Philosophers. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (2):175-178.
  14.  3
    James E. Cutting (2001). Invariants and Cues. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):102-103.
    The concepts of invariants and cues are useful, as are those of dorsal and ventral streams, but Norman overgeneralizes when interweaving them. Cues are not confined to identification tasks, invariants not to action, and both can be learned.
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  15.  3
    J. Cooper Cutting (2004). A Call for More Dialogue and More Details. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):194-194.
    Pickering & Garrod (P&G) argue that contemporary models of language use are inadequate. This has resulted largely because of an experimental focus on monologue rather than dialogue. I agree with the need for increased experimentation that focuses on the interplay between production and comprehension. However, I have some concerns about the Interactive Alignment model that the authors propose.
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  16. K. Bock & J. C. Cutting (1990). Production Units and Production Problems in Forming Long-Distance Dependencies. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 28 (6):502-502.
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  17. Je Cutting & N. Bruno (1987). Minimodularity and Visual Information About Depth. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 25 (5):334-334.
     
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  18. John Cutting (2000). Questionable Psychopathology. In Dan Zahavi (ed.), Exploring the Self. Amsterdam: J Benjamins 243--55.
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  19. M. Flueckiger, J. E. Cutting, C. Leoni-Salem & B. Baumberger (1996). Object and Path Perception in Simulated Locomotion. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview 89-89.
     
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