Search results for 'Cybernetics' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Donato Bergandi (2000). Eco-Cybernetics: The Ecology and Cybernetics of Missing Emergences. Kybernetes 29 (7/8):928-942..score: 18.0
    Considers that in ecosystem, landscape and global ecology, an energetics reading of ecological systems is an expression of a cybernetic, systemic and holistic approach. In ecosystem ecology, the Odumian paradigm emphasizes the concept of emergence, but it has not been accompanied by the creation of a method that fully respects the complexity of the objects studied. In landscape ecology, although the emergentist, multi-level, triadic methodology of J.K. Feibleman and D.T. Campbell has gained acceptance, the importance of emergent properties is still (...)
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  2. Andrew Pickering (2009). Beyond Design: Cybernetics, Biological Computers and Hylozoism. Synthese 168 (3):469 - 491.score: 18.0
    The history of British cybernetics offers us a different form of science and engineering, one that does not seek to dominate nature through knowledge. I want to say that one can distinguish two different paradigms in the history of science and technology: the one that Heidegger despised, which we could call the Modern paradigm, and another, cybernetic, nonModern, paradigm that he might have approved of. This essay focusses on work in the 1950s and early 1960s by two of Britain’s (...)
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  3. W. Ross Ashby (1956). An Introduction to Cybernetics. New York, J. Wiley.score: 18.0
    We must, therefore, make a study of mechanism; but some introduction is advisable, for cybernetics treats the subject from a new, and therefore unusual, ...
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  4. Keizo Sato (1991). From AI to Cybernetics. AI and Society 5 (2):155-161.score: 18.0
    Well-known critics of AI such as Hubert Dreyfus and Michael Polanyi tend to confuse cybernetics with AI. Such a confusion is quite misleading and should not be overlooked. In the first place, cybernetics is not vulnerable to criticism of AI as cognitivistic and behaviouristic. In the second place, AI researchers are recommended to consider the cybernetics approach as a way of overcoming the limitations of cognitivism and behaviourism.
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  5. Frederick J. Crosson (ed.) (1967). Philosophy And Cybernetics. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.score: 15.0
  6. Glenn Negley (1951). Cybernetics and Theories of Mind. Journal of Philosophy 48 (September):574-82.score: 15.0
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  7. Philippe Gagnon (2013). "Que reste-t-il de la théologie à l'âge électronique ? Valeur et cybernétique axiologique chez Raymond Ruyer" [What is left of Theology in the Electronic Age? Value and Axiological Cybernetics in Raymond Ruyer]. In Chromatikon IX: Annales de la philosophie en procès — Yearbook of Philosophy in Process, M. Weber & V. Berne (Eds.). 93-120.score: 15.0
    This is the outline: Introduction — La question de la cybernétique et de l'information — Une « pensée du milieu » — Cybernétique et homologie — Une théorie de l'apprentissage — L'information vue de l'autre côté — Champ et domaine unitaire — La thèse des « autres-je » — Le passage par l'axiologie — La rétroaction vraie — L'ontologie de Ruyer — Le bruissement de l'être même.
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  8. Roberto Cordeschi (2002). The Discovery of the Artificial: Behavior, Mind and Machines Before and Beyond Cybernetics. Kluwer.score: 15.0
    The book provides a valuable text for undergraduate and graduate courses on the historical and theoretical issues of Cognitive Science, Artificial Intelligence, Psychology, Neuroscience, and the Philosophy of Mind. The book should also be of interest for researchers in these fields, who will find in it analyses of certain crucial issues in both the earlier and more recent history of their disciplines, as well as interesting overall insights into the current debate on the nature of mind.
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  9. F. H. George (1979). Philosophical Foundations of Cybernetics. Abacus Press.score: 15.0
    Artificial intelligence and the interrogation game; Scientific method and explanation; Godel's incompleteness theorem; Determinism and uncertainty; Axioms, theorems and formalisation; Creativity; Consciousness and free will; Pragmatics; A ...
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  10. Keith Gunderson (1969). Cybernetics and Mind-Body Problems. Inquiry 12 (1-4):406-19.score: 15.0
    It is asked to what extent answers to such questions as ?Can machines think??, ?Could robots have feelings?? might be expected to yield insight into traditional mind?body questions. It has sometimes been assumed that answering the first set of questions would be the same as answering the second. Against this approach other philosophers have argued that answering the first set of questions would not help us to answer the second. It is argued that both of these assessments are mistaken. It (...)
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  11. Diego L. Rapoport (2011). Surmounting the Cartesian Cut Through Philosophy, Physics, Logic, Cybernetics, and Geometry: Self-Reference, Torsion, the Klein Bottle, the Time Operator, Multivalued Logics and Quantum Mechanics. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 41 (1):33-76.score: 15.0
    In this transdisciplinary article which stems from philosophical considerations (that depart from phenomenology—after Merleau-Ponty, Heidegger and Rosen—and Hegelian dialectics), we develop a conception based on topological (the Moebius surface and the Klein bottle) and geometrical considerations (based on torsion and non-orientability of manifolds), and multivalued logics which we develop into a unified world conception that surmounts the Cartesian cut and Aristotelian logic. The role of torsion appears in a self-referential construction of space and time, which will be further related to (...)
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  12. Gotthard Gunther (1965). Cybernetics and the Transition From Classical to Trans-Classical Logic. [Urbana, Biological Computer Laboratory, University of Illinois.score: 15.0
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  13. Kenneth M. Sayre (1976). Cybernetics and the Philosophy of Mind. Routledge and Kegan Paul.score: 15.0
     
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  14. Norbert Wiener (1961). Cybernetics. New York, M.I.T. Press.score: 15.0
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  15. Jiří Zeman (1988). Theory of Reflection and Cybernetics: The Concepts of Reflection and Information and Their Significance for Materialist Monism. Elsevier.score: 15.0
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  16. Anatol Rapoport (1949). Mathematical Biophysics, Cybernetics and Significs. Synthese 8 (1):182 - 193.score: 12.0
    It remains to summarize the contributions which each of the three disciplines discussed here is making toward the development of a science of man. "Significs" makes a study of the effects on human behavior of the linguistic aspects of the evaluative process, the most distinctly human aspect of the behavior of the human organism. "Mathematical Biophysics" seeks to describe the events associated with evaluative processes in physico-mathematical terms. "Cybernetics" is discovering important invariants common to these processes and others, particularly (...)
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  17. Sara Cannizzaro (2013). Where Did Information Go? Reflections on the Logical Status of Information in a Cybernetic and Semiotic Perspective. Biosemiotics 6 (1):105-123.score: 12.0
    This article explores the usefulness of interdisciplinarity as method of enquiry by proposing an investigation of the concept of information in the light of semiotics. This is because, as Kull, Deacon, Emmeche, Hoffmeyer and Stjernfelt state, information is an implicitly semiotic term (Biological Theory 4(2):167–173, 2009: 169), but the logical relation between semiosis and information has not been sufficiently clarified yet. Across the history of cybernetics, the concept of information undergoes an uneven development; that is, information is an ‘objective’ (...)
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  18. Richard A. Cohen (2000). Ethics and Cybernetics: Levinasian Reflections. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 2 (1):27-35.score: 12.0
    Is cybernetics good, bad, or indifferent? SherryTurkle enlists deconstructive theory to celebrate thecomputer age as the embodiment of difference. Nolonger just a theory, one can now live a virtual life. Within a differential but ontologically detachedfield of signifiers, one can construct and reconstructegos and environments from the bottom up andendlessly. Lucas Introna, in contrast, enlists theethical philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas to condemn thesame computer age for increasing the distance betweenflesh and blood people. Mediating the face-to-facerelation between real people, allowing (...)
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  19. Masudul Alam Choudhury & Mohammad Shahadat Hossain (2010). Neuro-Cybernetics of Socio-Scientific Systems. Mind and Society 9 (1):59-83.score: 12.0
    The field of information technology is broadened up to the domain of ‘learning’ systems and cybernetics. In covering this extension of the field due recourse is made to the epistemological basis of theory construction. When so comprehended, information technology becomes a philosophical inquiry on a variety of social, scientific and technological issues. A new idea that we refer to as neuro-cybernetics is born. The term neuro-cybernetics is used to delineate the epistemological field of system and cybernetic study. (...)
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  20. Ronald Kline (2011). Cybernetics as a Usable Past. Metascience 20 (3):519-524.score: 12.0
    Cybernetics as a usable past Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s11016-010-9497-x Authors Ronald R. Kline, Science and Technology Studies Department, 334 Rockefeller Hall, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14850, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  21. Angela Espinosa (2004). Organizational Cybernetics as a Tool Box to Assist in the Development of Evolutionary Learning Networks. World Futures 60 (1 & 2):137 – 145.score: 12.0
    Organizational cybernetics offers theoretical and methodological support for self-organizing communities seeking to contribute to the conscious evolution of society. Previous experiences with the Viable Systems Model (VSM) and Team Syntegrity (TS) illustrate ways of enabling social networks to create a shared language, reach democratic agreements, and develop knowledge networks.
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  22. Leon Rocha (2012). The Fateful Entanglements of Psychoanalysis, Cybernetics and Digital Media. Metascience 21 (2):435-438.score: 12.0
    The fateful entanglements of psychoanalysis, cybernetics and digital media Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9570-0 Authors Leon Antonio Rocha, Department of History and Philosophy of Science, University of Cambridge, Free School Lane, Cambridge, CB2 3RH UK Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  23. Guglielmo Tamburrini & Edoardo Datteri (2005). Machine Experiments and Theoretical Modelling: From Cybernetic Methodology to Neuro-Robotics. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 15 (3-4):335-358.score: 12.0
    Cybernetics promoted machine-supported investigations of adaptive sensorimotor behaviours observed in biological systems. This methodological approach receives renewed attention in contemporary robotics, cognitive ethology, and the cognitive neurosciences. Its distinctive features concern machine experiments, and their role in testing behavioural models and explanations flowing from them. Cybernetic explanations of behavioural events, regularities, and capacities rely on multiply realizable mechanism schemata, and strike a sensible balance between causal and unifying constraints. The multiple realizability of cybernetic mechanism schemata paves the way to (...)
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  24. B. Clarke (2012). From Information to Cognition: The Systems Counterculture, Heinz von Foerster's Pedagogy, and Second-Order Cybernetics. Constructivist Foundations 7 (3):196-207.score: 12.0
    Context: In this empirical and conceptual paper on the historical, philosophical, and epistemological backgrounds of second-order cybernetics, the emergence of a significant pedagogical component to Heinz von Foerster’s work during the last years of the Biological Computer Laboratory is placed against the backdrop of social and intellectual movements on the American landscape. Problem: Previous discussion in this regard has focused largely on the student radicalism of the later 1960s. A wider-angled view of the American intellectual counterculture is needed. However, (...)
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  25. Titus R. Neumann, Susanne Huber & Heinrich H. Bülthoff (2001). Artificial Systems as Models in Biological Cybernetics. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1071-1072.score: 12.0
    From the perspective of biological cybernetics, “real world” robots have no fundamental advantage over computer simulations when used as models for biological behavior. They can even weaken biological relevance. From an engineering point of view, however, robots can benefit from solutions found in biological systems. We emphasize the importance of this distinction and give examples for artificial systems based on insect biology.
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  26. D. Baecker (2010). The Culture of Cybernetics. Review of “The Black Boox. Volume III: 39 Steps' by Ranulph Glanville. Edition Echoraum, Vienna, 2009. [REVIEW] Constructivist Foundations 5 (2):102--103.score: 12.0
    Upshot: Ranulph Glanville’s musings about cybernetics are statements of wonder as much as careful reconstructions of the core ideas of cybernetics. In Vol. III of his Black Boox all 39 of them are collected, which appeared between 1994 and 2009 in the Journal, Cybernetics and Human Knowing. If Heinz von Foerster said that the ideas of second-order cybernetics are nowadays to be found just about?everywhere in everyday life, Glanville is not that sure about this.
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  27. S. Franchi (2007). Blunting the Edge of Second-Order Cybernetics: The Heritage of Heinz von Foerster. Review Of: Albert Müller & Karl H. Müller (Eds.) (2007) An Unfinished Revolution? [REVIEW] Constructivist Foundations 3 (1):53-54.score: 12.0
    Summary: The aim of this collection is to provide a two-fold access to von Foerster's legacy and his work at the Biological Computer Laboratory, the institution he founded and directed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign from 1958 to 1976. It represents a precious contribution for the understanding of BCL, a crucial but still not properly understood chapter in the history of cybernetics and, more generally, of cognitive science. It is greatly recommended.
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  28. V. Kenny (2009). "There's Nothing Like the Real Thing". Revisiting the Need for a Third-Order Cybernetics. Constructivist Foundations 4 (2):100 - 111.score: 12.0
    Purpose: To argue for the need to generate a third-order cybernetics to deal with the problematics of second-order cybernetics. Problem: The recent exponential increase in the use of the internet and other "media" to influence and shape dominant cultural experiences via "virtual reality" exploits a core facility of human psychology - that of being able to accept "substitutions" for the "Real Thing." In this paper, I want to raise some basic questions and dilemmas for our living in the (...)
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  29. Pierre Livet (1992). Second Cybernetics: A Double Strategy for Representing Cognition. In G. van der Vijve (ed.), New Perspectives on Cybernetics. 220--147.score: 12.0
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  30. Gordon Pask (1992). Introduction Different Kinds of Cybernetics. In. In G. van der Vijve (ed.), New Perspectives on Cybernetics. 11--31.score: 12.0
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  31. Jean Chambers (2001). A Cybernetic Theory of Morality and Moral Autonomy. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (2):177-192.score: 10.0
    Human morality may be thought of as a negative feedback cotrol system in which moral rules are reference values, and moral disapproval, blame, and punishment are forms of negative feedback given for violations of the moral rules. In such a system, if moral agents held each other accountable, moral norms would be enforced effectively. However, even a properly functioning social negative feedback system could not explain acts in which individual agents uphold moral rules in the face of contrary social pressure. (...)
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  32. Bennett Gilbert, Polanyi's Proof.score: 9.0
    Cybernetics,” which he presented as en suite with six articles by several others on the same subject in the same journal during the preceding 18 months. This group of short papers, starting with one by Karl Popper, may be regarded as part of the first wave of response to Alan Turing’s famous paper, “Computing Machinery and Intelligence,” in 1950. Polanyi read Turing’s paper in draft and discussed it directly with Turing. The polemic as to whether machines can think and (...)
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  33. Tara H. Abraham (2006). Cybernetics and Theoretical Approaches in 20th Century Brain and Behavior Sciences. Biological Theory 1 (4):418-422.score: 9.0
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  34. Diego L. Rapoport (2009). Surmounting the Cartesian Cut with Philosophy, Physics, Cybernetics and Geometry; Self.Reference, Torsion, the Klein Bottle, Multivalued Logics and Quantum Mechanics. foundations of physics 39 (09).score: 9.0
    In this transdisciplinary article which stems from philosophical considerations (that depart from phenomenology -after Merleau-Ponty, Heidegger and Rosen- and Hegelian dialectics), we develop a conception based on topological (the Moebius surface and the Klein bottle) and geometrical considerations (based on torsion and non-orientability of manifolds), and multivalued logics which we develop into a unified world conception that surmounts the Cartesian cut and Aristotelian logic. The role of torsion appears in a self-referential construction of space and time, which will be further (...)
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  35. Michael Polanyi (1952). The Hypothesis of Cybernetics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (8):312-315.score: 9.0
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  36. Philippe Gagnon (2002). La Théologie de la Nature Et la Science à l'Ère de L'Information. Cerf.score: 9.0
    The history of the relationship between Christian theology and the natural sciences has been conditioned by the initial decision of the masters of the "first scientific revolution" to disregard any necessary explanatory premiss to account for the constituting organization and the framing of naturally occurring entities. Not paying any attention to hierarchical control, they ended-up disseminating a vision and understanding in which it was no longer possible for a theology of nature to send questions in the direction of the experimental (...)
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  37. Simon Penny (2013). Art and Robotics: Sixty Years of Situated Machines. [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (2):147-156.score: 9.0
    This paper pursues the intertwined tracks of robotics and art since the mid 20th century, taking a loose chronological approach that considers both the devices themselves and their discursive contexts. Relevant research has occurred in a variety of cultural locations, often outside of or prior to formalized robotics contexts. Research was even conducted under the aegis of art or cultural practices where robotics has been pursued for other than instrumental purposes. In hindsight, some of that work seems remarkably prescient of (...)
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  38. Oliver L. Reiser (1955). Logic, Cybernetics, and Semantics. Synthese 9 (1):306 - 318.score: 9.0
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  39. J. O. Wisdom (1951). The Hypothesis of Cybernetics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 2 (5):1-24.score: 9.0
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  40. Warwick Anderson & Ian R. Mackay (2013). Fashioning the Immunological Self: The Biological Individuality of F. Macfarlane Burnet. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 47 (1):1-29.score: 9.0
    During the 1940s and 1950s, the Australian microbiologist F. Macfarlane Burnet sought a biologically plausible explanation of antibody production. In this essay, we seek to recover the conceptual pathways that Burnet followed in his immunological theorizing. In so doing, we emphasize the influence of speculations on individuality, especially those of philosopher Alfred North Whitehead; the impact of cybernetics and information theory; and the contributions of clinical research into autoimmune disease that took place in Melbourne. We point to the influence (...)
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  41. Sander Begeer (2005). Book Reviews - Roberto Cordeschi, the Discovery of the Artificial: Behaviour, Mind and Machines Before and Beyond Cybernetics, Dordrecht, the Netherlands: Kluwer Academic Publishers, 2002, XX + 312, ISBN 1-4020-0606-. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 15 (2):264-268.score: 9.0
  42. Russell L. Ackoff (1955). Book Review:Cybernetics (Transactions of the Ninth Conference, March 20-21, 1952) H. Von Foerster. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 22 (1):68-.score: 9.0
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  43. P. Kirschenmann (1966). On the Kinship of Cybernetics to Dialectical Materialism. Studies in East European Thought 6 (1):37-41.score: 9.0
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  44. Charles R. Dechert (1965). Cybernetics and the Human Person. International Philosophical Quarterly 5 (1):5-36.score: 9.0
    Contemporary approaches to the science of communication and control show some striking conceptual parallels with traditional aristotelian-Thomistic thought and suggest the major themes treated in this study: (a) the intellectual validity and necessity of non-Empirical models of the universe, (b) the clarification of traditional concepts of "form" and "in-Form-Ation" brought by communications theory, (c) the relation of form to the sensible and intelligible "species", (d) possible modes of persistence of the individual human "psyche" as an integral information pattern unified in (...)
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  45. Val Dusek (2010). Review of Michael Eldred, The Digital Cast of Being: Metaphysics, Mathematics, Cartesianism, Cybernetics, Capitalism, Communication. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2010 (6).score: 9.0
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  46. Ervin Laszlo (1973). Cybernetics of Musical Activity. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 31 (3):375-387.score: 9.0
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  47. Michael E. Levin (1978). Book Review:Cybernetics and the Philosophy of Mind Kenneth Sayre. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 45 (4):653-.score: 9.0
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  48. L. A. R. (1953). Book Review:Cybernetics: Circular Causal and Feedback Mechanisms in Biological and Social Systems H. Von Foerster. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 20 (4):346-.score: 9.0
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  49. S. Ceccato & C. Bougarel (1966). Cybernetics as a Discipline and an Interdiscipline. Diogenes 14 (53):99-114.score: 9.0
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  50. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (1978). Cybernetics and the Philosophy of Mind. New Scholasticism 52 (4):587-595.score: 9.0
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