Search results for 'Cybernetics Philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Kenneth M. Sayre (1976). Cybernetics and the Philosophy of Mind. Routledge and Kegan Paul.score: 61.0
    This book, published in 1976, presents an entirely original approach to the subject of the mind-body problem, examining it in terms of the conceptual links between the physical sciences and the sciences of human behaviour. It is based on the cybernetic concepts of information and feedback and on the related concepts of thermodynamic and communication-theoretic entropy. The foundation of the approach is the theme of continuity between evolution, learning and human consciousness. The author defines life as a process of energy (...)
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Frederick J. Crosson (ed.) (1967). Philosophy And Cybernetics. Notre Dame: University of Notre Dame Press.score: 60.0
  3. Diego L. Rapoport (2011). Surmounting the Cartesian Cut Through Philosophy, Physics, Logic, Cybernetics, and Geometry: Self-Reference, Torsion, the Klein Bottle, the Time Operator, Multivalued Logics and Quantum Mechanics. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 41 (1):33-76.score: 42.0
    In this transdisciplinary article which stems from philosophical considerations (that depart from phenomenology—after Merleau-Ponty, Heidegger and Rosen—and Hegelian dialectics), we develop a conception based on topological (the Moebius surface and the Klein bottle) and geometrical considerations (based on torsion and non-orientability of manifolds), and multivalued logics which we develop into a unified world conception that surmounts the Cartesian cut and Aristotelian logic. The role of torsion appears in a self-referential construction of space and time, which will be further related to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. F. H. George (1979). Philosophical Foundations of Cybernetics. Abacus Press.score: 39.0
    Artificial intelligence and the interrogation game; Scientific method and explanation; Godel's incompleteness theorem; Determinism and uncertainty; Axioms, theorems and formalisation; Creativity; Consciousness and free will; Pragmatics; A ...
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Michael E. Levin (1978). Book Review:Cybernetics and the Philosophy of Mind Kenneth Sayre. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 45 (4):653-.score: 39.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Keith Gunderson (1968). Minnesota Center for the Philosophy of Science Although the Last International Conference on Cybernetics Was Held in 1955, the Ensuing Blitzkrieg of Articles and Books in the Overlapping Areas of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and Computer Simu. In Raymond Klibansky (ed.), Contemporary Philosophy. Firenze, la Nuova Italia. 2--416.score: 39.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Martin Ringle (1978). Cybernetics and the Philosophy of Mind. International Studies in Philosophy 10:188-188.score: 39.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Jiüí Zeman (1968). Cybernetics and Philosophy in Eastern Europe. In Raymond Klibansky (ed.), Contemporary Philosophy. Firenze, la Nuova Italia. 2--407.score: 39.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Kristin Shrader-Frechette (1978). Cybernetics and the Philosophy of Mind. New Scholasticism 52 (4):587-595.score: 36.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Lee R. Kerschner (1966). Cybernetics and Soviet Philosophy. International Philosophical Quarterly 6 (2):270-285.score: 36.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Dominic J. Balestra (1978). "Cybernetics and the Philosophy of Mind," by Kenneth Sayre. The Modern Schoolman 55 (3):300-305.score: 36.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. R. J. B. (1968). Philosophy and Cybernetics. Review of Metaphysics 22 (2):393-393.score: 36.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. John Bryant (1991). Systems Theory and Scientific Philosophy: An Application of the Cybernetics of W. Ross Ashby to Personal and Social Philosophy, the Philosophy of Mind, and the Problems of Artificial Intelligence. University Press of America.score: 36.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Jiří Zeman (1988). Theory of Reflection and Cybernetics: The Concepts of Reflection and Information and Their Significance for Materialist Monism. Elsevier.score: 33.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Mincho Hadjiski & Veselin Petrov (eds.) (2008). Ontologies: Philosophical and Technological Problems: Proceedings of Solon - Sofia Lectures of Ontology, October 2007. Prof. Marin Drinov Academic Publishing House.score: 30.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Maria Laura Lanzillo & Silvia Rodeschini (eds.) (2011). Percorsi Della Dialettica Nel Novecento: Da Lukács Alla Cibernetica. Carocci.score: 30.0
    No categories
    Translate to English
    |
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. A. Pablo Iannone (2001). Dictionary of World Philosophy. Routledge.score: 27.0
    This is the first comprehensive reference to the vast field of world philosophy. The Dictionary covers all the major subfields of the discipline, with entries drawn from West African, Arabic, Chinese, Indian, Japanese, Jewish, Korean, Latin American, Maori, and Native American philosophy--including Nahua philosophy, a previously unexplored, but key instance of Pre-Hispanic thought. Entries include: * abazimu * abortion * Advaita * afrocentricity * age of the world * artificial life * baskets of knowledge * bhakti body (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. S. Brier (2009). Cybersemiotic Pragmaticism and Constructivism. Constructivist Foundations 5 (1):19 - 39.score: 27.0
    Context: Radical constructivism claims that we have no final truth criteria for establishing one ontology over another. This leaves us with the question of how we can come to know anything in a viable manner. According to von Glasersfeld, radical constructivism is a theory of knowledge rather than a philosophy of the world in itself because we do not have access to a human-independent world. He considers knowledge as the ordering of experience to cope with situations in a satisfactory (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Stuart Shanker (ed.) (1996). Philosophy of Science, Logic, and Mathematics in the Twentieth Century. Routledge.score: 27.0
    Volume 9 of the Routledge History of Philosophy surveys ten key topics in the Philosophy of Science, Logic and Mathematics in the Twentieth Century. Each article is written by one of the world's leading experts in that field. The papers provide a comprehensive introduction to the subject in question, and are written in a way that is accessible to philosophy undergraduates and to those outside of philosophy who are interested in these subjects. Each chapter contains an (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Justin Leiber (1985). Can Animals and Machines Be Persons?: A Dialogue. Hackett Pub. Co..score: 24.0
    COMMISSIONER KLAUS VERSEN: Counselors, I want to remind you both of two matters. First, this commission is not bound by the statutes or legal precedents of ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Evandro Agazzi (1972). Recent Developments of the Philosophy of Science in Italy. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 3 (2):359-371.score: 24.0
    Summary Philosophy of science is, in Italy, a relatively young field of research. The foreword of the paper gives some explanation of this fact, which is the consequence of a particular situation of Italian culture between the two world wars. When problems in this field began to be studied after the war, they were practically imported matter, and a rather long time was necessary before an original research started in this country. The beginning of it was marked by a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Waltraud Brennenstuhl (1982). Control and Ability: Towards a Biocybernetics of Language. J. Benjamins Pub. Co..score: 24.0
    This is the first of the two volumes the second volume being Thomas Ballmer s Biological Foundations of Linguistic Communication (P&B III:7) treating ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. F. H. George (1962). The Brain As A Computer. Addison-Wesley.score: 24.0
  24. Ian Parker & Ángel J. Gordo-López (eds.) (1999). Cyberpsychology. Routledge.score: 24.0
    On a basic level, "cyberpsychology" refers to the comparison of the mind with different kinds of machines. This multidisciplinary collection brings together essays by leading psychologists and cultural theorists working in the spheres of technology and psychology to explore links between popular culture, technoscience, feminism and politics. Tracing historical and contemporary lines of argument around the fascination between different forms of psychological and machine culture, contributors articulate "cyberpsychological" reflections on contemporary crises in psychology with emerging technologies of the self. The (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jerome Rothstein (1958). Communication, Organization, and Science. [Indian Hills, Colo.]Falcon's Wing Press.score: 24.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. V. F. Turchin (1977). The Phenomenon of Science. Columbia University Press.score: 24.0
  27. Eric Dietrich (2011). There Is No Progress in Philosophy. Essays in Philosophy 12 (2):9.score: 21.0
    Except for a patina of twenty-first century modernity, in the form of logic and language, philosophy is exactly the same now as it ever was; it has made no progress whatsoever. We philosophers wrestle with the exact same problems the Pre-Socratics wrestled with. Even more outrageous than this claim, though, is the blatant denial of its obvious truth by many practicing philosophers. The No-Progress view is explored and argued for here. Its denial is diagnosed as a form of anosognosia, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Babette E. Babich (2003). On the Analytic-Continental Divide in Philosophy : Nietzsche's Lying Truth, Heidegger's Speaking Language, and Philosophy. In C. G. Prado (ed.), A House Divided: Comparing Analytic and Continental Philosophy. Humanity Books.score: 21.0
    On the political nature of the analytic - continental distinction in professional philosophy and the general tendency to discredit continental philosophy while redesignating the rubric as analytically conceived.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Lydia Patton (2010). Review: Makkreel and Luft (Eds), Neo-Kantianism in Contemporary Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 30 (4):280-282.score: 21.0
    A volume dealing seriously with the influence of the major schools of Neo-Kantian thought on contemporary philosophy has been needed sorely for some time. But this volume of essays aims higher: it 'is published in the hopes that it will secure Neo-Kantianism a significant place in contemporary philosophical discussions' (Introduction, 1). The aim of the book, then, is partly to provide a history of major Neo-Kantian thinkers and their influence, and partly to argue for their importance in contemporary (continental) (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Joshua Knobe (2007). Experimental Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 2 (1):81–92.score: 21.0
    Claims about people's intuitions have long played an important role in philosophical debates. The new field of experimental philosophy seeks to subject such claims to rigorous tests using the traditional methods of cognitive science – systematic experimentation and statistical analysis. Work in experimental philosophy thus far has investigated people's intuitions in philosophy of language, philosophy of mind, epistemology, and ethics. Although it is now generally agreed that experimental philosophers have made surprising discoveries about people's intuitions in (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Neil Levy & Yasuko Kitano (2011). We're All Folk: An Interview with Neil Levy About Experimental Philosophy and Conceptual Analysis. Annals of the Japan Association for Philosophy of Science 19:87-98.score: 21.0
    The following is a transcript of the interview I (Yasuko Kitano) conducted with Neil Levy (The Centre for Applied Philosophy and Public Ethics, CAPPE) on the 23rd in July 2009, while he was in Tokyo to give a series of lectures on neuroethics at The University of Tokyo Center for Philosophy. I edited his words for publication with his approval.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Ian Hacking (2011). Why is There Philosophy of Mathematics AT ALL? South African Journal of Philosophy 30 (1):1-15.score: 21.0
    Mathematics plays an inordinate role in the work of many of famous Western philosophers, from the time of Plato, through Husserl and Wittgenstein, and even to the present. Why? This paper points to the experience of learning or making mathematics, with an emphasis on proof. It distinguishes two sources of the perennial impact of mathematics on philosophy. They are classified as Ancient and Enlightenment. Plato is emblematic of the former, and Kant of the latter. The Ancient fascination arises from (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Thomas Mormann (2013). Topology as an Issue for History of Philosophy of Science. In Hanne Andersen, Dennis Dieks, Wenceslao J. Gonzalez, Thomas Uebel & Gregory Wheeler (eds.), New Challenges to Philosophy of Science. Springer. 423--434.score: 21.0
    Since antiquity well into the beginnings of the 20th century geometry was a central topic for philosophy. Since then, however, most philosophers of science, if they took notice of topology at all, considered it as an abstruse subdiscipline of mathematics lacking philosophical interest. Here it is argued that this neglect of topology by philosophy may be conceived of as the sign of a conceptual sea-change in philosophy of science that expelled geometry, and, more generally, mathematics, from the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Mark Schroeder (2012). Philosophy of Language for Metaethics. In Gillian Russell & Delia Graff Fara (eds.), The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Metaethics is the study of metaphysics, epistemology, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of language, insofar as they relate to the subject matter of moral or, more broadly, normative discourse – the subject matter of what is good, bad, right or wrong, just, reasonable, rational, what we must or ought to do, or otherwise. But out of these four ‘core’ areas of philosophy, it is plausibly the philosophy of language that is most central to metaethics (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Jennifer Nagel & Kaija Mortensen (forthcoming). Armchair-Friendly Experimental Philosophy. In Justin Sytsma & Wesley Buckwalter (eds.), A Companion to Experimental Philosophy. Blackwell.score: 21.0
    Once symbolized by a burning armchair, experimental philosophy has in recent years shifted away from its original hostility to traditional methods. Starting with a brief historical review of the experimentalist challenge to traditional philosophical practice, this chapter looks at research undercutting that challenge, and at ways in which experimental work has evolved to complement and strengthen traditional approaches to philosophical questions.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Dermot Moran (2008). Husserl's Transcendental Philosophy and the Critique of Naturalism. Continental Philosophy Review 41 (4):401-425.score: 21.0
    Throughout his career, Husserl identifies naturalism as the greatest threat to both the sciences and philosophy. In this paper, I explicate Husserl’s overall diagnosis and critique of naturalism and then examine the specific transcendental aspect of his critique. Husserl agreed with the Neo-Kantians in rejecting naturalism. He has three major critiques of naturalism: First, it (like psychologism and for the same reasons) is ‘countersensical’ in that it denies the very ideal laws that it needs for its own justification. Second, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Massimo Pigliucci (2012). Doctor Who and Philosophy. [REVIEW] Philosophy Now 89 (Mar/Apr):43-44.score: 21.0
    The good Doctor has a lot to say about philosophy.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Lorenz Krüger, Thomas Sturm, Wolfgang Carl & Lorraine Daston (eds.) (2005). Why Does History Matter to Philosophy and the Sciences? Walter DeGruyter.score: 21.0
    What are the relationships between philosophy and the history of philosophy, the history of science and the philosophy of science? This selection of essays by Lorenz Krüger (1932-1994) presents exemplary studies on the philosophy of John Locke and Immanuel Kant, on the history of physics and on the scope and limitations of scientific explanation, and a realistic understanding of science and truth. In his treatment of leading currents in 20th century philosophy, Krüger presents new and (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Francis Heylighen, Paul Cilliers & Carlos Gershenson (2006). Complexity and Philosophy. In [Book Chapter] (in Press).score: 21.0
    The science of complexity is based on a new way of thinking that stands in sharp contrast to the philosophy underlying Newtonian science, which is based on reductionism, determinism, and objective knowledge. This paper reviews the historical development of this new world view, focusing on its philosophical foundations. Determinism was challenged by quantum mechanics and chaos theory. Systems theory replaced reductionism by a scientifically based holism. Cybernetics and postmodern social science showed that knowledge is intrinsically subjective. These developments (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Paul Hoyningen-Huene (1993). Reconstructing Scientific Revolutions: Thomas S. Kuhn's Philosophy of Science. University of Chicago Press.score: 21.0
    Few philosophers of science have influenced as many readers as Thomas S. Kuhn. Yet no comprehensive study of his ideas has existed--until now. In this volume, Paul Hoyningen-Huene examines Kuhn's work over four decades, from the days before The Structure of Scientific Revolutions to the present, and puts Kuhn's philosophical development in a historical framework. Scholars from disciplines as diverse as political science and art history have offered widely differing interpretations of Kuhn's ideas, appropriating his notions of paradigm shifts and (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Dachun Liu & Yongmou Liu (2009). A Reflection on the Alternative Philosophy of Science. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (4):576-588.score: 21.0
    A prominent phenomenon in contemporary philosophy of science has been the unexpected rise of alternative philosophers of science. This article analyses in depth such alternative philosophers of science as Paul Feyerabend, Richard Rorty, and Michel Foucault, summarizing the similarities and differences between alternative philosophies of science and traditional philosophy of science so as to unveil the trends in contemporary philosophy of science. With its different principles and foundation, alternative philosophy of science has made breakthroughs in terms (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Markus Schrenk (2010). Mauro Dorato * The Software of the Universe: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of the Laws of Nature. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science (E-Version) 62 (1):225-232.score: 21.0
    This is a review of Mauro Dorato's book "The Software of the Universe: An Introduction to the History and Philosophy of the Laws of Nature".
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Mark Kaplan (1983). Decision Theory as Philosophy. Philosophy of Science 50 (4):549-577.score: 21.0
    Is Bayesian decision theory a panacea for many of the problems in epistemology and the philosophy of science, or is it philosophical snake-oil? For years a debate had been waged amongst specialists regarding the import and legitimacy of this body of theory. Mark Kaplan had written the first accessible and non-technical book to address this controversy. Introducing a new variant on Bayesian decision theory the author offers a compelling case that, while no panacea, decision theory does in fact have (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. John Bickle, Pete Mandik & Anthony Landreth, The Philosophy of Neuroscience. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 21.0
    Over the past three decades, philosophy of science has grown increasingly “local.” Concerns have switched from general features of scientific practice to concepts, issues, and puzzles specific to particular disciplines. Philosophy of neuroscience is a natural result. This emerging area was also spurred by remarkable recent growth in the neurosciences. Cognitive and computational neuroscience continues to encroach upon issues traditionally addressed within the humanities, including the nature of consciousness, action, knowledge, and normativity. Empirical discoveries about brain structure and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Mary K. McCurry, Susan M. Hunter Revell & Sr Callista Roy (2010). Knowledge for the Good of the Individual and Society: Linking Philosophy, Disciplinary Goals, Theory, and Practice. Nursing Philosophy 11 (1):42-52.score: 21.0
    Nursing as a profession has a social mandate to contribute to the good of society through knowledge-based practice. Knowledge is built upon theories, and theories, together with their philosophical bases and disciplinary goals, are the guiding frameworks for practice. This article explores a philosophical perspective of nursing's social mandate, the disciplinary goals for the good of the individual and society, and one approach for translating knowledge into practice through the use of a middle-range theory. It is anticipated that the integration (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. André Kukla (2000). Social Constructivism and the Philosophy of Science. Routledge.score: 21.0
    Social constructivists maintain that we invent the properties of the world rather than discover them. Is reality constructed by our own activity? Or, more provocatively, are scientific facts--is everything --constructed? Social Constructivism and the Philosophy of Science is a clear assessment of this critical and increasingly important debate. Andre Kukla presents a comprehensive discussion of the philosophical issues involved and analyzes the strengths and weaknesses of a range of constructivist arguments, illustrating the divide between the sociology and the (...) of science through examples as varied as laboratory science, time, and criminality. He argues that current philosophical objections to constructivism are drastically inconclusive, while offering and developing new objections. Throughout, Kukla distinguishes between the social causes of scientific beliefs and the view that all ascertainable facts are constructed. (shrink)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Jaime Nubiola, A Plea for a Peircean Turn in Analytic Philosophy. Paideia, Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy.score: 21.0
    Criticisms of analytic philosophy have increased in intensity in the last decade, denouncing specifically its closing in on itself, which results in barrenness and ignorance of real human problems. The thought of C. S. Peirce is proposed as a fruitful way of renewing the analytic tradition and obviating these criticisms. While this paper is largely a reflection on Hilary Putnam’s study of the historical development of analytic philosophy, not only can some of its main roots (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Jonathan Y. Tsou (2011). The Importance of History for Philosophy of Psychiatry: The Case of the DSM and Psychiatric Classification. Journal of the Philosophy of History 5 (3):446-470.score: 21.0
    Abstract Recently, some philosophers of psychiatry (viz., Rachel Cooper and Dominic Murphy) have analyzed the issue of psychiatric classification. This paper expands upon these analyses and seeks to demonstrate that a consideration of the history of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) can provide a rich and informative philosophical perspective for critically examining the issue of psychiatric classification. This case is intended to demonstrate the importance of history for philosophy of psychiatry, and more generally, the potential (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. James Genone (2012). Theories of Reference and Experimental Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 7 (2):152-163.score: 21.0
    In recent years, experimental philosophers have questioned the reliance of philosophical arguments on intuitions elicited by thought experiments. These challenges seek to undermine the use of this methodology for a particular domain of theorizing, and in some cases to raise doubts about the viability of philosophical work in the domain in question. The topic of semantic reference has been an important area for discussion of these issues, one in which critics of the reliance on intuitions have made particularly strong claims (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Matthew C. Halteman (2002). Toward a Continental Philosophy of Religion: Derrida, Responsibility, and Non-Dogmatic Faith. In Philip Goodchild (ed.), Rethinking Philosophy of Religion: Approaches from Continental Philosophy. Fordham University Press.score: 21.0
    From its inception in Kant's efforts to articulate a "religion within the limits of reason alone," the Continental tradition has maintained a strict division of labor between theological and philosophical reflection on religion. In what follows, I examine this continental legacy in the context of Jacques Derrida's recent work on the concept of responsibility. First I discuss three guiding themes (the limits of speculative analysis, the idea of nondogmatic religion, and the importance of the other) that characterize the continental tradition's (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000