Search results for 'Cyborg' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter-Paul Verbeek (2008). Cyborg Intentionality: Rethinking the Phenomenology of Human–Technology Relations. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):387-395.score: 18.0
    This article investigates the types of intentionality involved in human–technology relations. It aims to augment Don Ihde’s analysis of the relations between human beings and technological artifacts, by analyzing a number of concrete examples at the limits of Ihde’s analysis. The article distinguishes and analyzes three types of “cyborg intentionality,” which all involve specific blends of the human and the technological. Technologically mediated intentionality occurs when human intentionality takes place “through” technological artifacts; hybrid intentionality occurs when the technological actually (...)
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  2. Don Ihde (2008). Aging: I Don't Want to Be a Cyborg! [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):397-404.score: 18.0
    Examination is made of a range of cyborg solutions to bodily problems due to damage, but here with particular reference to aging. Both technological and animal implants, transplants and prosthetic devices are phenomenologically analyzed. The resultant trade-off phenomena are compared to popular culture technofantasies and desires and finally to human attitudes toward mortality and contingency. The parallelism of resistance to contingent existence and to becoming a cyborg is noted.
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  3. Andy Clark (2008). The Frozen Cyborg: A Reply to Selinger and Engström. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):343-346.score: 18.0
    Selinger and Engstrom, A moratorium on cyborgs: Computation, cognition and commerce, 2008 (this issue) urge upon us a moratorium on ‘cyborg discourse’. But the argument underestimates the richness and complexity of our ongoing communal explorations. It leans on a somewhat outdated version of the machine metaphor (exemplified perhaps by a frozen 1970’s Cyborg). The modern cyborg, informed by an evolving computational model of mind, can play a positive role in the critical discussions that Selinger and Engstrom seek.
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  4. Simon Bacon (2013). “We Can Rebuild Him!”: The Essentialisation of the Human/Cyborg Interface in the Twenty-First Century, or Whatever Happened to The Six Million Dollar Man? [REVIEW] AI and Society 28 (3):267-276.score: 18.0
    This paper aims to show how recent cinematic representations reveal a far more pessimistic and essentialised vision of Human/Cyborg hybridity in comparison with the more enunciative and optimistic ones seen at the end of the twentieth century. Donna Haraway’s still influential 1985 essay “A Cyborg Manifesto” saw the combination of the organic and the technological as offering new and exciting ways beyond the normalised culturally constructed categories of gender and identity formation. However, more recently critics see her later (...)
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  5. Shelley Park (2010). Cyborg Mothering. In Mothers Who Deliver: Feminist Interventions into Public and Interpersonal Discourse.score: 18.0
    As new communication technologies transform everyday life in the 21st century, personal, family, and other social relations are transformed with it. As a way of exploring the larger question, "how exactly does communication technology transform love and how love is lived?" here I explore the cell phone, instant messaging and other communication technologies as electronic extensions of maternal bodies connecting (cyber)mother to (cyber)children. -/- Feminist explorations of the marketing and use of cell phones, as well as other communication technologies, have (...)
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  6. Jennifer Lapum, Suzanne Fredericks, Heather Beanlands, Elizabeth McCay, Jasna Schwind & Daria Romaniuk (2012). A Cyborg Ontology in Health Care: Traversing Into the Liminal Space Between Technology and Person-Centred Practice. Nursing Philosophy 13 (4):276-288.score: 15.0
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  7. S. Chopra & S. Dexter (2007). Free Software and the Political Philosophy of the Cyborg World. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 37 (2):41-52.score: 15.0
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  8. Anne Kull (2001). The Cyborg as an Interpretation of Culture-Nature. Zygon 36 (1):49-56.score: 15.0
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  9. R. Pope (2009). A Cyborg's Testimonial: Mourning Blade Runner's Cryptic Images. Film-Philosophy 12 (2).score: 15.0
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  10. Gill Kirkup (ed.) (2000). The Gendered Cyborg: A Reader. Routledge in Association with the Open University.score: 14.0
    The Gendered Cyborg brings together material from a variety of disciplines that analyze the relationship between gender and technoscience, and the way that this relationship is represented through ideas, language and visual imagery. The book opens with key feminist articles from the history and philosophy of science. They look at the ways that modern scientific thinking has constructed oppositional dualities such as objectivity/subjectivity, human/machine, nature/science, and male/female, and how these have constrained who can engage in science/technology and how they (...)
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  11. Glen Mazis (2008). Cyborg Life: The In-Between of Humans and Machines. PhaenEx 3 (2):14-36.score: 12.0
    Cyborgs are ongoing becomings of a doubly “in-between” temporality of humans and machines. Materially made from components of both sorts of beings, cyborgs gain increasing function through an interweaving in which each alters the other, from the level of “neural plasticity” to software updates to emotional breakthroughs of which both are a part. One sort of temporal in-between is of the progressive unfolding of a deepening becoming as “not-one-not-two” and the other is a “doubling back” of time into itself in (...)
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  12. Kevin Warwick (2003). Cyborg Morals, Cyborg Values, Cyborg Ethics. Ethics and Information Technology 5 (3):131-137.score: 12.0
    The era of the Cyborg is now upon us. This has enormous implications on ethical values for both humans and cyborgs. In this paper the state of play is discussed. Routes to cyborgisation are introduced and different types of Cyborg are considered. The author's own self-experimentation projects are described as central to the theme taken. The presentation involves ethical aspects of cyborgisation both as it stands now and those which need to be investigated in the near future as (...)
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  13. Margaret E. Toye (2012). Donna Haraway's Cyborg Touching (Up/On) Luce Irigaray's Ethics and the Interval Between: Poethics as Embodied Writing. Hypatia 27 (1):182-200.score: 12.0
    In this article, I argue that Donna Haraway's figure of the cyborg needs to be reassessed and extricated from the many misunderstandings that surround it. First, I suggest that we consider her cyborg as an ethical concept. I propose that her cyborg can be productively placed within the ethical framework developed by Luce Irigaray, especially in relationship to her concept of the “interval between.” Second, I consider how Haraway's “cyborg writing” can be understood as embodied ethical (...)
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  14. Casper Bruun Jensen (2008). Developing/Development Cyborgs. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):375-385.score: 12.0
    The paper takes as its starting point Donna Haraway’s suggestion, “The actors are cyborg, nature is coyote, and the geography is elsewhere”. It discusses first the understanding of the cyborg promoted by Haraway as illustrating an ontological non-humanist disposition, rather than a periodizing claim. The second part of the paper examines some instances of low-tech cyborg identities, which have emerged in developing countries (elsewhere) as a consequence of development initiatives. The paper argues that the quite literal attempts (...)
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  15. Kutte Jönsson (2007). Who's Afraid of Stella Walsh? On Gender, 'Gene Cheaters', and the Promises of Cyborg Athletes. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (2):239 – 262.score: 12.0
    In this article, I argue that there are moral reasons to embrace the construction of self-designing and sex/gender-neutral cyborg athletes. In fact, with the prospect of advanced genetic and cyborg technology, we may face a future where sport (as we know it) occurs in its purest form; that is, where athletes get evaluated by athletic performance only and not by their gender, and where it becomes impossible to discriminate athletes based on their body constitution and gender identity. The (...)
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  16. Esther-Mirjam Sent (2000). Herbert A. Simon as a Cyborg Scientist. Perspectives on Science 8 (4):380-406.score: 12.0
    : This paper discusses how Herbert Simon's initial interest in decision making became transformed into a focus on understanding human problem solving in response to the concrete conditions of the Cold War and the practical goals of the military. In particular, it suggests a connection between the seachange in Simon's interest and his shift in patronage. As a result, Simon is portrayed as a component of the scientific-military World War II cyborg that further evolved during the Cold War. Moving (...)
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  17. Marie Fox (2000). Pre-Persons, Commodities or Cyborgs: The Legal Construction and Representation of the Embryo. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 8 (2):171-188.score: 12.0
    This paper explores how embryos have been representedin law. It argues that two main models haveunderpinned legal discourse concerning the embryo. Onediscourse, which has become increasingly prevalent,views embryos as legal subjects or persons. Suchrepresentations are facilitated by technologicaldevelopments such as ultrasound imaging. In additionto influencing Parliamentary debate prior to thepassage of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act1990, images of embryos as persons featureprominently in popular culture, including advertisingand films, and this discourse came to the fore in the`orphaned embryo' debate in (...)
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  18. Martin Wood (1999). Cyborg: A Design for Life in the Borderlands. Emergence 1 (3):92-104.score: 12.0
    Traditional managers have insisted in a highly structured way of institutionalizing the mechanistic, functianalized, physical management of people and artifacts. This focus on structure creates a tension between the need for rigid command on the OM hand and that for flexible response to threats on the other. The modern worker i s thereby confronted with a bewildering multiplicity of partial identities, contradictory viewpoints and corporate strategies that pull in different directions. Wood suggests a contrasting approach, the cyborg self; a (...)
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  19. Guillaume Dumas Jean-Arthur Micoulaud-Franchi, Guillaume Fond (2013). Cyborg Psychiatry to Ensure Agency and Autonomy in Mental Disorders. A Proposal for Neuromodulation Therapeutics. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 12.0
    Neuromodulation therapeutics—as repeated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS) and neurofeedback—are valuable tools for psychiatry. Nevertheless, they currently face some limitations: rTMS has confounding effects on neural activation patterns, and neurofeedback fails to change neural dynamics in some cases. Here we propose how coupling rTMS and neurofeedback can tackle both issues by adapting neural activations during rTMS and actively guiding individuals during neurofeedback. An algorithmic challenge then consists in designing the proper recording, processing, feedback, and control of unwanted effects. But this new (...)
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  20. Hilary Lim (1999). Caesareans and Cyborgs. Feminist Legal Studies 7 (2):133-173.score: 12.0
    This paper argues that cyborg perspectives offer real possibilities for the debate around enforced caesareans and the search for a language to encompass embodied maternal subjectivity. It is suggested, with reference to the fictional narrative of Star Trek, that cyborg figures have the power to disrupt the liberal subject and the body in legal discourse, not least because the plethora of cyborgs challenges simple conceptions of connections/disconnections between bodies. Feminist readings of case law relating to enforced caesarean sections (...)
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  21. André Nusselder (2009). Interface Fantasy: A Lacanian Cyborg Ontology. Mit Press.score: 10.0
    Behind our computer screens we are all cyborgs: through fantasy we can understand our involvement in virtual worlds.
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  22. Eric Dietrich (2008). Some Strangeness in the Proportion, or How to Stop Worrying and Learn to Love the Mechanistic Forces of Darkness. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):349-352.score: 9.0
    Understanding humans requires viewing them as mechanisms of some sort, since understanding anything requires seeing it as a mechanism. It is science’s job to reveal mechanisms. But science reveals much more than that: it also reveals enduring mystery—strangeness in the proportion. Concentrating just on the scientific side of Selinger’s and Engström’s call for a moratorium on cyborg discourse, I argue that this strangeness prevents cyborg discourse from diminishing us.
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  23. Maartje Schermer (2009). The Mind and the Machine. On the Conceptual and Moral Implications of Brain-Machine Interaction. Nanoethics 3 (3):217-230.score: 9.0
    Brain-machine interfaces are a growing field of research and application. The increasing possibilities to connect the human brain to electronic devices and computer software can be put to use in medicine, the military, and entertainment. Concrete technologies include cochlear implants, Deep Brain Stimulation, neurofeedback and neuroprosthesis. The expectations for the near and further future are high, though it is difficult to separate hope from hype. The focus in this paper is on the effects that these new technologies may have on (...)
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  24. Evan Selinger (2008). Introduction: Cyborg Embodiment: Affect, Agency, Intentionality, and Responsibility. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):317-325.score: 9.0
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  25. John Protevi & Roger Pippin (2008). Affect, Agency and Responsibility: The Act of Killing in the Age of Cyborgs. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):405-413.score: 9.0
    Draft 13 April 2007. Under review at Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences.
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  26. Andrew Koch (2005). Cyber Citizen or Cyborg Citizen: Baudrillard, Political Agency, and the Commons in Virtual Politics. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 20 (2 & 3):159 – 175.score: 9.0
    The ethical commitment to democracy requires creating the public space for a rational discourse among real alternatives by the population. In this article, I argue that the Internet fails in this task on 2 fronts. Inspired by the work of Jean Baudrillard, the work argues that the Internet reinforces a structure of passive political agents through its 1-way form of communication. The Internet is designed to deliver political text, not engage the public in dialogue about the direction of collective decision (...)
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  27. Paola Marrati (2010). The Natural Cyborg: The Stakes of Bergson's Philosophy of Evolution. Southern Journal of Philosophy 48 (s1):3-17.score: 9.0
  28. Chris Crittenden (2002). Self-Deselection: Technopsychotic Annihilation Via Cyborg. Ethics and the Environment 7 (2):127-152.score: 9.0
    The cry that advanced machines will come to dominate human beings resounds from the time of the Luddites up to the current consternation by the chief scientist of Sun Microsystems, Bill Joy. My theme is a twist on this fear: self-deselection, the possibility that humans will voluntarily combine their own bodies with technological additions to the point where it could reasonably be said that our species has been replaced by another kind of entity, a hybrid of human and radical enhancement, (...)
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  29. Henk G. Geertsema (2006). Cyborg: Myth or Reality? Zygon 41 (2):289-328.score: 9.0
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  30. Noel Gough (2004). RhizomANTically Becoming-Cyborg: Performing Posthuman Pedagogies. Educational Philosophy and Theory 36 (3):253–265.score: 9.0
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  31. Harry Kunneman (2006). De Barmhartige Cyborg. Krisis 7 (1):10-25.score: 9.0
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  32. Raymond Kolcaba (2000). Angelic Machines: A Philosophical Dialogue (2). [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 2 (1):11-17.score: 9.0
    Is machine autonomy the same as human autonomy? Answers to this question are developed inphilosophical dialogue. Becket Geist, a romanticphilosopher with scientific leanings, is irked by thearrogance of Fortran McCyborg – a Model 2000 cyborg. Nonette Naturski, a champion of naturalistic views,joins Becket in playing devil''s advocate by arguingthat Fortran''s actions are voluntary, not chosen byhim, and lacking the freedom caused by deliberatedesire. With the attempts to reduce Fortran''s status,Fortran ups the ante by arguing for yet higher status– that (...)
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  33. Derrick de Kerckhove (2003). Metal and Flesh, And: Cyborg: Digital Destiny and Human Possibility in the Age of the Wearable Computer (Review). Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 46 (3):454-456.score: 9.0
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  34. Helen W. Kennedy (2004). The Cyborg Experiments: The Extensions of the Body in the Media Age. British Journal of Aesthetics 44 (1):106-109.score: 9.0
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  35. Andrea M. Matwyshyn (2009). CSR and the Corporate Cyborg: Ethical Corporate Information Security Practices. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):579 - 594.score: 9.0
    Relying heavily on Thomas Dunfee's work, this article conducts an in-depth analysis of the relationship between law and business ethics in the context of corporate information security. It debunks the two dominant arguments against corporate investment in information security and explains why socially responsible corporate conduct necessitates strong information security practices. This article argues that companies have ethical obligations to improve information security arising out of a duty to avoid knowingly causing harm to others and, potentially, a duty to exercise (...)
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  36. Andy Miah, The Olympic Games and the Cyborg- Athlete: Any Room for Improvement?score: 9.0
    This paper is prompted by the radical emergence of technology that exists in contemporary sport and culture. Of particular interest are the technologies that threaten to alter an already changing concept of the human condition, such as genetic engineering and prosthetics. However, it is fundamental to consider the more subtle technologies, which influence change in sports, such as the equipment used by an athlete and the methods of training that are unmistakably technological. Such subtle technologies, I argue, can provoke a (...)
     
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  37. Robyn F. Brothers (1997). Cyborg Identities and the Relational Web: Recasting 'Narrative Identity' in Moral and Political Theory. Metaphilosophy 28 (3):249-258.score: 9.0
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  38. Jasbir K. Puar (2012). " I Would Rather Be a Cyborg Than a Goddess": Becoming-Intersectional in Assemblage Theory. Philosophia 2 (1):49-66.score: 9.0
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  39. Austin Corbett (2009). Beyond Ghost in the (Human) Shell. Journal of Evolution and Technology 20 (1).score: 9.0
    The cyborg inscribes itself nearly everywhere, forcing us to re-examine discourses of humanity, modernity, Japan, and technology. I will trace the early history of the cyborg, from its hidden roots and precursors in fin de siècle Gothic fiction to its fully formed conception in 1990s science fiction and Donna Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto. I will then move beyond the well-known cyborg genealogy to delve into contemporary portrayals that radically expand the cyborg’s political potential, and posthuman role, (...)
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  40. Anne Kull (2002). Speaking Cyborg: Technoculture and Technonature. Zygon 37 (2):279-288.score: 9.0
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  41. Linda MacDonald Glenn (2005). A Review Of: “James Hughes. 2004. Citizen Cyborg: Why Democratic Societies Must Respond to the Redesigned Human of the Future”. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 5 (5):81-82.score: 9.0
  42. Lee Quinby (1997). Technoppression and the Intricacies of Cyborg Flesh. Constellations 4 (2):229-247.score: 9.0
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  43. Alison Adam (2003). Cyborgs in the Chinese Room: Boundaries Transgressed and Boundaries Blurred. In John M. Preston & Michael A. Bishop (eds.), Views Into the Chinese Room: New Essays on Searle and Artificial Intelligence. Oxford University Press. 319--337.score: 9.0
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  44. Stacy Alaimo (forthcoming). Cyborg and Ecofeminist Interventions: Challenges for an Environmental Feminism. Feminist Studies.score: 9.0
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  45. Celia Amorós (2010). La filosofía en la era de la globalización ¿Existe una filosofía feminista? La filosofía como polémica. Daímon 50:21-30.score: 9.0
    Se presenta la filosofía, de acuerdo con Michele le Docuff, como “poner el mundo como la tesis del otro”, como un habitarlo para la polémica y para la crítica. Poner así el mundo sería la condición para elaborar una “ontología del presente” en sentido foucaultiano, pero trascendiéndola en un sentido más acorde con el imaginario de la globalización. Para ello recurrimos a la “antropología cyborg” de Donna Haraway, desde donde podemos determinar “los parámetros de una nueva conciencia de la (...)
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  46. J. Armitage (forthcoming). Chris Hables Gray, Ed. The Cyborg Handbook. Radical Philosophy.score: 9.0
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  47. Iñaki Arzoz Karasusan & Andoni Alonso Puelles (2007). Destino cyborg: breve antología sobre el cyborg vasco. In Jesús Arpal Poblador & Ignacio Mendiola (eds.), Estudios Sobre Cuerpo, Tecnología y Cultura. Universidad Del País Vasco.score: 9.0
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  48. Neil Badmington (2000). Posthumanist (Com) Promises: Diffracting Donna Haraway's Cyborg Through Marge Piercy's Body of Glass.”. In , Posthumanism. Palgrave. 85--97.score: 9.0
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  49. Tudor Balinisteanu (2007). The Cyborg Goddess: Social Myths of Women as Goddesses of Technologized Otherworlds. Feminist Studies 33 (2):394-423.score: 9.0
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  50. Betty M. Bayer (1999). Psychological Ethics and Cyborg Body Politics. In Ian Parker & Ángel J. Gordo-López (eds.), Cyberpsychology. Routledge. 113--129.score: 9.0
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