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  1. Cynthia B. Cohen (forthcoming). Waiking a Finf Linf. Hastings Center Report.
     
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  2. Cynthia B. Cohen Peter J. Cohen (2010). International Stem Cell Tourism and the Need for Effective Regulation: Part I: Stem Cell Tourism in Russia and India: Clinical Research, Innovative Treatment, or Unproven Hype? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 20 (1):pp. 27-49.
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  3. Cynthia B. Cohen Peter J. Cohen (2010). International Stem Cell Tourism and the Need for Effective Regulation: Part II: Developing Sound Oversight Measures and Effective Patient Support. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 20 (3):207-230.
    Clinics and hospitals around the globe are offering stem cell treatments to persons with serious conditions for whom no effective therapies are available in their home countries. Many of these treatments, which are touted as cures for such conditions as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's Diseases, multiple sclerosis, and spinal cord injuries, have not gone through clinical trials that establish their safety and efficacy. Indeed, it is unclear whether some of them even utilize stem cells. State regulation of these therapies tends to (...)
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  4. Mary A. Majumder & Cynthia B. Cohen (2009). Future Directions for Oversight of Stem Cell Research in the United States: An Update. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 19 (2):195-200.
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  5. Cynthia B. Cohen (2008). Some Perils of “Waiting to Be Born”: Fertility Preservation in Girls Facing Certain Treatments for Cancer. American Journal of Bioethics 8 (6):30 – 32.
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  6. John A. Robertson, Cynthia B. Cohen & Insoo Hyun (2008). Big Bang Theory: More Reason to Scrap Bush's Stem Cell Policy. Hastings Center Report 38 (6):4-6.
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  7. Cynthia B. Cohen (2007). Beyond the Human Neuron Mouse to the NAS Guidelines. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (5):46 – 49.
  8. Cynthia B. Cohen (2007). Ways of Being Personal and Not Being Personal About Religious Beliefs in the Clinical Setting. American Journal of Bioethics 7 (7):16 – 18.
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  9. Cynthia B. Cohen (2006). Religion, Public Reason, and Embryonic Stem Cell Research. In David E. Guinn (ed.), Handbook of Bioethics and Religion. Oxford University Press.
     
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  10. Cynthia B. Cohen (2005). Promises and Perils of Public Deliberation: Contrasting Two National Bioethics Commissions on Embryonic Stem Cell Research. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (3):269-288.
    : National bioethics commissions have struggled to develop ethically warranted methods for conducting their deliberations. The National Bioethics Advisory Commission in its report on stem cell research adopted an approach to public deliberation indebted to Rawls in that it sought common ground consistent with shared values and beliefs at the foundation of a well-ordered democracy. In contrast, although the research cloning and stem cell research reports of the President's Council on Bioethics reveal that it broached two different methods of public (...)
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  11. Phillip Karpowicz, Cynthia B. Cohen & Derek J. Van der Kooy (2005). Developing Human-Nonhuman Chimeras in Human Stem Cell Research: Ethical Issues and Boundaries. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 15 (2):107-134.
    : The transplantation of adult human neural stem cells into prenatal non-humans offers an avenue for studying human neural cell development without direct use of human embryos. However, such experiments raise significant ethical concerns about mixing human and nonhuman materials in ways that could result in the development of human-nonhuman chimeras. This paper examines four arguments against such research, the moral taboo, species integrity, "unnaturalness," and human dignity arguments, and finds the last plausible. It argues that the transfer of human (...)
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  12. Cynthia B. Cohen (2004). Stem Cell Research in the U.S. After the President's Speech of August 2001. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (1):97-114.
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  13. Cynthia B. Cohen (2003). Creating Human-Nonhuman Chimeras: Of Mice and Men. American Journal of Bioethics 3 (3):3 – 5.
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  14. Cynthia B. Cohen (2002). Public Policy and the Sale of Human Organs. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 12 (1):47-64.
    : Gill and Sade, in the preceding article in this issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, argue that living individuals should be free from legal constraints against selling their organs. The present commentary responds to several of their claims. It explains why an analogy between kidneys and blood fails; why, as a matter of public policy, we prohibit the sale of human solid organs, yet allow the sale of blood; and why their attack on Kant's putative argument against (...)
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  15. Cynthia B. Cohen (2002). Stem Cell Research and the Role of the New President's Council on Bioethics. American Journal of Bioethics 2 (1):43 – 44.
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  16. Cynthia B. Cohen (2001). The Interests of Egg Donors: Who is Deceiving Whom? American Journal of Bioethics 1 (4):20 – 21.
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  17. Cynthia B. Cohen (2001). Banning Human Cloning--Then What? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 11 (2):205-209.
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  18. Cynthia B. Cohen, Sondra E. Wheeler & David A. Scott (2001). Walking a Fine Line: Physician Inquiries Into Patients' Religious and Spiritual Beliefs. Hastings Center Report 31 (5):29-39.
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  19. Cynthia B. Cohen, Sondra E. Wheeler, David A. Scott, Barbara Springer Edwards & Patricia Lusk (2000). Prayer as Therapy: A Challenge to Both Religious Belief and Professional Ethics. Hastings Center Report 30 (3):40-47.
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  20. Cynthia B. Cohen (1999). Selling Bits and Pieces of Humans to Make Babies: The Gift of the Magi Revisited. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 24 (3):288 – 306.
    Reproductive medicine, a sector of a health care system increasingly captured by the demands of the marketplace, is enmeshed in a drive to sell certain human bits and pieces, such as gametes, cells, fetal eggs, and fetal ovaries, for reproductive purposes. The ethical objection raised by Kant and Radin to the sale of human organs -that this is incompatible with human dignity and worth - also applies to these sales. Moreover, such sales nullify the reproductive paradigm, irretrievably replacing it with (...)
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  21. Cynthia B. Cohen (1998). Wrestling with the Future: Should We Test Children for Adult-Onset Genetic Conditions? Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8 (2):111-130.
    : Genetics professionals have been reluctant to test children for adult-onset conditions because they believe this would create psychosocial harm to children not counterbalanced by significant benefits. An additional concern they express is that such testing would violate the autonomy of these children as adults. Yet weighing the harms and benefits of such testing results in a draw, with no substantial harms proven. Moreover, such testing can enhance, rather than violate the adult autonomy of these children. In deciding whether (...)
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  22. Cynthia B. Cohen & Elizabeth Leibold McCloskey (1998). Introduction. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 8 (2):vii-x.
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  23. Cynthia B. Cohen & Mary Anne Warren (1998). New Ways of Making Babies: The Case of Egg Donation. Bioethics-Oxford 12 (1):86-87.
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  24. Cynthia B. Cohen (1997). Unmanaged Care: The Need to Regulate New Reproductive Technologies in the United States. Bioethics 11 (3-4):348-365.
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  25. Cynthia B. Cohen (1996). Christian Perspectives on Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia: The Anglican Tradition. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (4):369-379.
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  26. Cynthia B. Cohen (1996). “Give Me Children or I Shall Die!”: New Reproductive Technologies and Harm to Children. Hastings Center Report 26 (2):19-27.
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  27. Cynthia B. Cohen (1994). Future Directions for Human Cloning by Embryo Splitting: After the Hullabaloo. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 4 (3):187-192.
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  28. Cynthia B. Cohen & Elizabeth Leibold McCloskey (1994). Private Bioethics Forums: Counterpoint to Government Bodies. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 4 (3):283-289.
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  29. Cynthia B. Cohen (1992). Avoidng "Cloudcuckooland" in Ethics Committee Case Review: Matching Models to Issues and Concerns. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (4):294-299.
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  30. Cynthia B. Cohen & Peter J. Cohen (1992). Required Reconsideration of "Do-Not-Resuscitate" Orders in the Operating Room and Certain Other Treatment Settings. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 20 (4):354-363.
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  31. Cynthia B. Cohen (1991). Choosing the Complete Life. Hastings Center Report 21 (1):41-43.
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  32. Cynthia B. Cohen (1990). 1990 and Beyond: The Genie Out of the Bottle? Hastings Center Report 20 (5):33-33.
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  33. Cynthia B. Cohen (1990). Ethics Committees As Corporate and Public Policy Advocates. Hastings Center Report 20 (5):36-37.
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  34. Cynthia B. Cohen (1990). The Adolescence of Ethics Committees. Hastings Center Report 20 (2):29-29.
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  35. Cynthia B. Cohen (1989). The Social Transformation of Some American Ethics Committees. Hastings Center Report 19 (5):21-21.
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  36. Cynthia B. Cohen (1989). Who Will Guard the Guardians? Hastings Center Report 19 (1):19-19.
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  37. Cynthia B. Cohen (1988). Birth of a Network. Hastings Center Report 18 (1):11-11.
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  38. Cynthia B. Cohen (1988). Is Case Consultation in Retreat? Hastings Center Report 18 (4):23-23.
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  39. Nat Hentoff, Daniel Callahan, Gary E. Crum & Cynthia B. Cohen (1988). The Nazi Analogy in Bioethics. Hastings Center Report 18 (4):29-33.
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  40. Cynthia B. Cohen (1986). Can Autonomy and Equity Coexist in the ICU? Hastings Center Report 16 (5):39-41.
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  41. Cynthia B. Cohen (1983). 'Quality of Life' and the Analogy with the Nazis. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 8 (2):113-136.
    into treatment decisions is viewed as pernicious by some who claim that these presuppose the Nazi position that those who are ‘devoid of value’ must be exterminated. ‘Quality of life’ judgments are said to deny the equal value of human beings and to assume that some lives are not ‘worthy to be lived’. It is argued that the analogy misconstrues the senses of ‘value’ and ‘quality’ employed by Naziism and a ‘quality of life’ position. This leads the analogizers incorrectly to (...)
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  42. Cynthia B. Cohen (1980). The Trials of Socrates and Joseph K. Philosophy and Literature 4 (2):212-228.
  43. Cynthia B. Cohen (1973). The Logic of Religious Language. Religious Studies 9 (2):143 - 155.
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  44. Cynthia B. Cohen (1972). Some Aspects of Ian Ramsey's Empiricism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (1):2 - 17.
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