6 found
Sort by:
  1. Cynthia D. Rittenhouse (1996). Survival Skills and Ethics Training for Graduate Students: A Graduate Student Perspective. Science and Engineering Ethics 2 (3):367-380.
    Graduate students in the sciences must develop practical skills geared toward scientific survival and success. This is particularly true now, given the paucity of research funds and jobs. Along with more elementary skills, research ethics should be an integral part of students’ scientific training. Survival skills include research skills, communication skills, general efficiency, and preparation for post-graduate work. Ethics training covers guidelines for use of animal and human subjects, data treatment, disclosure, credit issues, conflicts of interest, and response to misconduct. (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Jody Resnick, Robert Stickgold, Cynthia D. Rittenhouse & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Self-Representation and Bizarreness in Children′s Dream Reports Collected in the Home Setting. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):30-45.
    We have conducted a home-based study of children′s dream reports in which parents used open-ended interviewing styles to collect 88 dream reports from their 4- to 10-year-old children in the comfortable and supportive environment of their own homes. Particular attention was paid to formal properties including characters , settings, self-representation, and bizarreness. In contrast to previous studies, our data indicate that young children are able to give long, detailed reports of their dreams that share many formal characteristics with adult dream (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Cynthia D. Rittenhouse, Robert Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Constraint on the Transformation of Characters, Objects, and Settings in Dream Reports. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):100-113.
    To extend the hypothesis that bizarre discontinuities in dreams result from the interaction of chaotic, "bottom-up" brainstem activation with "top-down" cortical synthesis, we have performed a detailed analysis of dream discontinuities using a new methodology that allows for objective characterization of this formal dream feature. Transformations of characters and objects in dream reports were found to follow definite associational rules. While there were 11 examples of character–character transformation and 7 of inanimate object–inanimate object transformation, transformations of characters into inanimate objects (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Robert Stickgold, Cynthia D. Rittenhouse & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Dream Splicing: A New Technique for Assessing Thematic Coherence in Subjective Reports of Mental Activity. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):114-128.
    A novel "dream splicing" technique allows the objective evaluation of thematic coherence in dreams. In this study, dream reports were cut into segments and segments randomly recombined to form spliced reports. Judges then attempted to distinguish spliced reports from intact ones. Five judges correctly scored 22 spliced and intact reports 82% of the time ; 13 of the 22 reports were correctly scored by all five judges . We conclude that most dream reports contain sufficient coherence to allow judges to (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Jeffrey P. Sutton, Cynthia D. Rittenhouse, Edward Pace-Schott, Jane M. Merritt, Robert Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1994). Emotion and Visual Imagery in Dream Reports: A Narrative Graphing Approach. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):89-99.
    To test the notion that shifts in visual imagery and attention are correlated with experiences of emotion, we studied 10 dream reports using an affirmative probe of emotion and a quantitative measure of plot discontinuity. We found that emotion, especially changes in emotion, are correlated with discontinuities in visual imagery. These correlations are quantified using a new graph theoretical method for analyzing narrative reports.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Jeffrey P. Sutton, Cynthia D. Rittenhouse, Edward Pace-Schott, Robert Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1994). A New Approach to Dream Bizarreness: Graphing Continuity and Discontinuity of Visual Attention in Narrative Reports. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):61-88.
    In this paper, a new method of quantitatively assessing continuity and discontinuity of visual attention is developed. The method is based on representing narrative information using graph theory. It is applicable to any type of narrative report. Since dream reports are often described as bizarre, and since bizarreness is partially characterized by discontinuities in plot, we chose to test our method on a set of dream data. Using specific criteria for identifying and arranging objects of visual attention, dream narratives from (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation