Search results for 'Czech language Syntax' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Petr Sgall (ed.) (1984). Contributions to Functional Syntax, Semantics, and Language Comprehension. J. Benjamins Pub. Co..score: 297.0
    On the Notion "Type of Language" Petr Sgall It is well known that the high frequency of terminological vagueness and confusion has been a serious obstacle ...
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  2. Tim Crane (1990). The Language of Thought: No Syntax Without Semantics. Mind and Language 5 (3):187-213.score: 126.0
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  3. Yosef Grodzinsky (2000). The Neurology of Syntax: Language Use Without Broca's Area. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):1-21.score: 108.0
    A new view of the functional role of the left anterior cortex in language use is proposed. The experimental record indicates that most human linguistic abilities are not localized in this region. In particular, most of syntax (long thought to be there) is not located in Broca's area and its vicinity (operculum, insula, and subjacent white matter). This cerebral region, implicated in Broca's aphasia, does have a role in syntactic processing, but a highly specific one: It is the (...)
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  4. Charles E. M. Dunlop (1990). Conceptual Dependency as the Language of Thought. Synthese 82 (2):275-96.score: 98.0
    Roger Schank's research in AI takes seriously the ideas that understanding natural language involves mapping its expressions into an internal representation scheme and that these internal representations have a syntax appropriate for computational operations. It therefore falls within the computational approach to the study of mind. This paper discusses certain aspects of Schank's approach in order to assess its potential adequacy as a (partial) model of cognition. This version of the Language of Thought hypothesis encounters some of (...)
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  5. David Devidi & Graham Solomon (1995). Tolerance and Metalanguages in Carnap'slogical Syntax of Language. Synthese 103 (1):123 - 139.score: 96.0
    Michael Friedman has recently argued that Carnap'sLogical Syntax of Language is fundamentally flawed in a way that reveals the ultimate failure of logical positivism. Friedman's argument depends crucially on two claims: (1) that Carnap was committed to the view that there is a universal metalanguage and (2) that given what Carnap wanted from a metalanguage, in particular given that he wanted a definition of analytic for an object language, he was in fact committed to a hierarchy of (...)
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  6. Alan Richardson (2011). Pierre Wagner (Ed.): Carnap's Logical Syntax of Language. Palgrave-MacMillan, 2009, 288pp, £57.00 HB. [REVIEW] Metascience 20 (3):599-600.score: 96.0
    Pierre Wagner (ed.): Carnap’s logical syntax of language . Palgrave-MacMillan, 2009, 288pp, £57.00 HB Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-2 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9522-8 Authors Alan Richardson, Department of Philosophy, University of British Columbia, 1866 Main Mall—E370, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 Canada Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  7. Ömer Naci Soykan (2012). On the Relationships Between Syntax and Semantics with Regard to the Turkish Language. Cultura 9 (2):61-76.score: 96.0
    A belief commonly held in linguistics and philosophy is that semantics is defined by syntax. In this article, I will demonstrate that this does not hold true for Turkish. A fundamental syntactical rule builds around the successive order of words or speech units in a sentence. The order determines the meaning of the sentence, which in turn is rendered meaningless if the rule is not observed. In a given language, if a sentence retains meaning without this rule being (...)
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  8. James Russell (2004). What is Language Development?: Rationalist, Empiricist, and Pragmatist Approaches to the Acquisition of Syntax. OUP Oxford.score: 96.0
    Language development is one of the major battle grounds within the humanities and sciences. This is the first time that the three major theories in language development research have been fully described and compared within the covers of a single book. The three approaches: (1) The rationalism of Chomsky and the syntactic nativism that it entails; (2) The empiricism instinct in connectionist modelling of syntactic development; (3) The pragmatism of those who see the child as actively 'constructing' a (...)
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  9. Curtis Carter, Painting and Language: A Pictoral Syntax of Shapes.score: 96.0
    In previous articles, the author proposed that paintings can have syntactic rules. In this article he develops his proposal further and shows that shapes act as syntactic elements in the languages of painting styles. He meets Nelson Goodman's objections to his proposal by showing that shapes meet the criterion of syntactic discreteness proposed by the latter to separate linguistic from other symbolic systems. His approach is to specify style as the domain of a language of painting, to show that (...)
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  10. Richard Creath (2009). The Gentle Strength of Tolerance : The Logical Syntax of Language and Carnap's Philosophical Programme. In Pierre Wagner (ed.), Carnap's Logical Syntax of Language. Palgrave Macmillan. 203--214.score: 96.0
  11. S. Awodey & A. W. Carus (2007). Carnap's Dream: Gödel, Wittgenstein, and Logical, Syntax. Synthese 159 (1):23-45.score: 90.0
    In Carnap’s autobiography, he tells the story how one night in January 1931, “the whole theory of language structure” in all its ramifications “came to [him] like a vision”. The shorthand manuscript he produced immediately thereafter, he says, “was the first version” of Logical Syntax of Language. This document, which has never been examined since Carnap’s death, turns out not to resemble Logical Syntax at all, at least on the surface. Wherein, then, did the momentous insight (...)
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  12. Murat Aydede (1997). Language of Thought: The Connectionist Contribution. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 7 (1):57-101.score: 90.0
    Fodor and Pylyshyn's critique of connectionism has posed a challenge to connectionists: Adequately explain such nomological regularities as systematicity and productivity without postulating a "language of thought" (LOT). Some connectionists like Smolensky took the challenge very seriously, and attempted to meet it by developing models that were supposed to be non-classical. At the core of these attempts lies the claim that connectionist models can provide a representational system with a combinatorial syntax and processes sensitive to syntactic structure. They (...)
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  13. Ray Jackendoff (2003). Précis of Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution,. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):651-665.score: 90.0
    The goal of this study is to reintegrate the theory of generative grammar into the cognitive sciences. Generative grammar was right to focus on the child's acquisition of language as its central problem, leading to the hypothesis of an innate Universal Grammar. However, generative grammar was mistaken in assuming that the syntactic component is the sole course of combinatoriality, and that everything else is “interpretive.” The proper approach is a parallel architecture, in which phonology, syntax, and semantics are (...)
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  14. Mark D. Roberts, Ultrametric Distance in Syntax.score: 90.0
    Phrase structure trees have a hierarchical structure. In many subjects, most notably in {\bf taxonomy} such tree structures have been studied using ultrametrics. Here syntactical hierarchical phrase trees are subject to a similar analysis, which is much simpler as the branching structure is more readily discernible and switched. The occurrence of hierarchical structure elsewhere in linguistics is mentioned. The phrase tree can be represented by a matrix and the elements of the matrix can be represented by triangles. The height at (...)
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  15. P. Thomas Schoenemann (1999). Syntax as an Emergent Characteristic of the Evolution of Semantic Complexity. Minds and Machines 9 (3):309-346.score: 90.0
    It is commonly argued that the rules of language, as distinct from its semantic features, are the characteristics which most clearly distinguish language from the communication systems of other species. A number of linguists (e.g., Chomsky 1972, 1980; Pinker 1994) have suggested that the universal features of grammar (UG) are unique human adaptations showing no evolutionary continuities with any other species. However, recent summaries of the substantive features of UG are quite remarkable in the very general nature of (...)
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  16. Raffaella Bernardi & Anna Szabolcsi (2008). Optionality, Scope, and Licensing: An Application of Partially Ordered Categories. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 17 (3):237-283.score: 90.0
    This paper uses a partially ordered set of syntactic categories to accommodate optionality and licensing in natural language syntax. A complex but well-studied data set pertaining to the syntax of quantifier scope and negative polarity licensing in Hungarian is used to illustrate the proposal. The presentation is geared towards both linguists and logicians. The paper highlights that the main ideas can be implemented in different grammar formalisms, and discusses in detail an implementation where the partial ordering on (...)
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  17. M. Dolores Jiménez López (2006). A Grammar Systems Approach to Natural Language Grammar. Linguistics and Philosophy 29 (4):419 - 454.score: 90.0
    Taking as its starting point significant similarities between a formal language model—Grammar Systems—and a grammatical theory—Autolexical Syntax—in this paper we suggest the application of the former to the topic of the latter. To show the applicability of Grammar Systems Theory to grammatical description, we introduce a formal-language-theoretic framework for the architecture of natural language grammar: Linguistic Grammar Systems. We prove the adequacy of this model by highlighting its features (modularity, parallelism, interaction) and by showing the similarity (...)
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  18. James W. Garson (1997). Syntax in a Dynamic Brain. Synthese 110 (3):343-55.score: 90.0
    Proponents of the language of thought (LOT) thesis are realists when it comes to syntactically structured representations, and must defend their view against instrumentalists, who would claim that syntactic structures may be useful in describing cognition, but have no more causal powers in governing cognition than do the equations of physics in guiding the planets. This paper explores what it will take to provide an argument for LOT that can defend its conclusion from instrumentalism. I illustrate a difficulty in (...)
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  19. P. Thomas Schoenemann (1999). Syntax as an Emergent Characteristic of the Evolution of Semantic Complexity. Minds and Machines 9 (3):309-346.score: 90.0
    It is commonly argued that the rules of language, as distinct from its semantic features, are the characteristics which most clearly distinguish language from the communication systems of other species. A number of linguists (e.g., Chomsky 1972, 1980; Pinker 1994) have suggested that the universal features of grammar (UG) are unique human adaptations showing no evolutionary continuities with any other species. However, recent summaries of the substantive features of UG are quite remarkable in the very general nature of (...)
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  20. Barbara C. Scholz (2007). Systematicity and Natural Language Syntax. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 7 (3):375-402.score: 90.0
    A lengthy debate in the philosophy of the cognitive sciences has turned on whether the phenomenon known as ‘systematicity’ of language and thought shows that connectionist explanatory aspirations are misguided. We investigate the issue of just which phenomenon ‘systematicity’ is supposed to be. The much-rehearsed examples always suggest that being systematic has something to do with ways in which some parts of expressions in natural languages (and, more conjecturally, some parts of thoughts) can be substituted for others without altering (...)
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  21. Christopher Potts, Comparative Economy Conditions in Natural Language Syntax.score: 90.0
    The most conceptually drastic change in natural language syntactic theory in recent years is the introduction of economy conditions (ECs). Although there is not a unified formal notion of economy, the intuition is that natural languages are governed by a general “less is more” principle. Those who take this seriously, and regard it not just as principle guiding the researcher but as something to be implemented directly in grammars, are often led to comparative economy conditions (comparative ECs), which select (...)
     
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  22. Rudolf Carnap (1937). The Logical Syntax of Language. London, K. Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co., Ltd..score: 84.0
    Available for the first time in 20 years, here is the Rudolf Carnap's famous principle of tolerance by which everyone is free to mix and match the rules of ...
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  23. Pierre Wagner (ed.) (2009). Carnap's Logical Syntax of Language. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 84.0
    This volumes aim is to provide an introduction to Carnaps book from a historical and philosophical perspective, each chapter focusing on one specific issue. The book will be of interest not only to Carnap scholars but to all those interested in the history of analytical philosophy.
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  24. Magda Petrjánošová & Sylvie Graf (2012). “The Austrians Were Surprised That I Didn't Speak German”: The Role of Language in Czech-Austrian Relations. Human Affairs 22 (4):539-557.score: 84.0
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  25. Susan Carey (2001). The Representation of Number in Natural Language Syntax and in Language of Thought: A Case Study of the Evolution and Development of Representational Resources. In João Branquinho (ed.), The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 23--53.score: 84.0
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  26. Roman Kralik (2013). The Reception of Soren Kierkegaard in Czech Language Writings. Filosoficky Casopis 61 (3):443-451.score: 84.0
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  27. Terence E. Horgan & John L. Tienson (2006). Cognition Needs Syntax but Not Rules. In Robert J. Stainton (ed.), Contemporary Debates in Cognitive Science. Malden MA: Blackwell Publishing. 147--158.score: 80.0
    Human cognition is rich, varied, and complex. In this Chapter we argue that because of the richness of human cognition (and human mental life generally), there must be a syntax of cognitive states, but because of this very richness, cognitive processes cannot be describable by exceptionless rules. The argument for syntax, in Section 1, has to do with being able to get around in any number of possible environments in a complex world. Since nature did not know where (...)
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  28. Wolfram Hinzen (2013). Narrow Syntax and the Language of Thought. Philosophical Psychology 26 (1):1-23.score: 78.0
    A traditional view maintains that thought, while expressed in language, is non-linguistic in nature and occurs in non-linguistic beings as well. I assess this view against current theories of the evolutionary design of human grammar. I argue that even if some forms of human thought are shared with non-human animals, a residue remains that characterizes a unique way in which human thought is organized as a system. I explore the hypothesis that the cause of this difference is a grammatical (...)
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  29. Richard Horsey (2001). Definitions: Implications for Syntax, Semantics, and the Language of Thought, by Annabel Cormack. Mind and Language 16 (3):345–349.score: 78.0
  30. Jan Woleński (2012). Logic as Calculus Versus Logic as Language, Language as Calculus Versus Language as Universal Medium, and Syntax Versus Semantics. Logica Universalis 6 (3-4):587-596.score: 78.0
    This paper discusses the distinctions indicated in its title. It is argued that the distinction between syntax and semantics is much more important for the present situation in logic than other distinctions. In particular, doing formal syntax and formal semantics requires the use of an informal melanguage based on ordinary mathematics.
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  31. Guy Longworth (2009). Ignorance of Linguistics: A Note on Devitt's Ignorance of Language. Croatian Journal of Philosophy 25 (1):21-34.score: 76.0
    Michael Devitt has argued that Chomsky, along with many other Linguists and philosophers, is ignorant of the true nature of Generative Linguistics. In particular, Devitt argues that Chomsky and others wrongly believe the proper object of linguistic inquiry to be speakers' competences, rather than the languages that speakers are competent with. In return, some commentators on Devitt's work have returned the accusation, arguing that it is Devitt who is ignorant about Linguistics. In this note, I consider whether there might be (...)
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  32. Andrea Moro (2011). “Kataptation” or the Qwerty-Effect in Language Evolution. Frontiers in Psychology 2:50.score: 74.0
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  33. María Azucena Penas Ibáñez (1994). Relations Between Semantics and Syntax in Literary Language. In Carlos Inchaurralde (ed.), Perspectives on Semantics and Specialised Languages. Departamento de Filología Inglesa y Alemana, Universidad de Zaragoza.score: 74.0
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  34. W. Tecumseh Fitch (2005). The Evolution of Language: A Comparative Review. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 20 (2-3):193-203.score: 72.0
    For many years the evolution of language has been seen as a disreputable topic, mired in fanciful “just so stories” about language origins. However, in the last decade a new synthesis of modern linguistics, cognitive neuroscience and neo-Darwinian evolutionary theory has begun to make important contributions to our understanding of the biology and evolution of language. I review some of this recent progress, focusing on the value of the comparative method, which uses data from animal species to (...)
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  35. Glen A. Mazis (1990). Merleau Ponty and the 'Syntax in Depth': Semiotics and Language as 'Another Less Heavy, More Transparent Body'. In Recent Developments in Theory and History: The Semiotic Web 1990.score: 72.0
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  36. Hilla Jacobson-Horowitz (2004). Syntax, Semantics, and Intentional Aspects. Philosophical Papers 33 (1):67-95.score: 72.0
    Abstract It is widely assumed that the meaning of at least some types of expressions involves more than their reference to objects, and hence that there may be co-referential expressions which differ in meaning. It is also widely assumed that ?syntax does not suffice for semantics?, i.e. that we cannot account for the fact that expressions have semantic properties in purely syntactical or computational terms. The main goal of the paper is to argue against a third related assumption, namely (...)
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  37. William E. Seager (1992). Thought and Syntax. Philosophy of Science Association 1992:481-491.score: 72.0
    It has been argued that Psychological Externalism is irrelevant to psychology. The grounds for this are that PE fails to individuate intentional states in accord with causal power, and that psychology is primarily interested in the causal roles of psychological states. It is also claimed that one can individuate psychological states via their syntactic structure in some internal "language of thought". This syntactic structure is an internal feature of psychological states and thus provides a key to their causal powers. (...)
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  38. Thomas Oberdan (1992). The Concept of Truth in Carnap'slogical Syntax of Language. Synthese 93 (1-2):239 - 260.score: 72.0
  39. Laura Lakusta & Barbara Landau (2012). Language and Memory for Motion Events: Origins of the Asymmetry Between Source and Goal Paths. Cognitive Science 36 (3):517-544.score: 72.0
    When people describe motion events, their path expressions are biased toward inclusion of goal paths (e.g., into the house) and omission of source paths (e.g., out of the house). In this paper, we explored whether this asymmetry has its origins in people’s non-linguistic representations of events. In three experiments, 4-year-old children and adults described or remembered manner of motion events that represented animate/intentional and physical events. The results suggest that the linguistic asymmetry between goals and sources is not fully rooted (...)
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  40. Tadeusz Wieslaw Zawidzki (2006). Sexual Selection for Syntax and Kin Selection for Semantics: Problems and Prospects. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 21 (4):453-470.score: 72.0
    The evolution of human language, and the kind of thought the communication of which requires it, raises considerable explanatory challenges. These systems of representation constitute a radical discontinuity in the natural world. Even species closely related to our own appear incapable of either thought or talk with the recursive structure, generalized systematicity, and task-domain neutrality that characterize human talk and the thought it expresses. W. Tecumseh Fitch’s proposal (2004, in press) that human language is descended from a sexually (...)
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  41. Sahotra Sarkar (1992). “The Boundless Ocean of Unlimited Possibilities”: Logic in Carnap'slogical Syntax of Language. [REVIEW] Synthese 93 (1-2):191 - 237.score: 72.0
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  42. Jeffrey Heinz & William Idsardi (2013). What Complexity Differences Reveal About Domains in Language. Topics in Cognitive Science 5 (1):111-131.score: 72.0
    An important distinction between phonology and syntax has been overlooked. All phonological patterns belong to the regular region of the Chomsky Hierarchy, but not all syntactic patterns do. We argue that the hypothesis that humans employ distinct learning mechanisms for phonology and syntax currently offers the best explanation for this difference.
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  43. L. Susan Stebbing (1938). The Logical Syntax of Language. By Rudolf Carnap. Translated From the German by Amethe Smeaton (Countess von Zeppelin). (London: Kegan Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co., Ltd. 1937. Pp. Xvi + 352. Price 25s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 13 (52):485-.score: 72.0
  44. David Pesetsky, The Battle for Language: From Syntax to Phonics.score: 72.0
    tongues with the utmost fluency. Any and every Japanese child — all speak Japanese without difficulty. Does that not show a startling talent? How, by what means, does..
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  45. Iain DeWitt (2013). Language Evolution and Recursive Thought. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 72.0
    Language evolution and recursive thought.
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  46. Karen Emmorey (2000). The Syntax of American Sign Language: Functional Categories and Hierarchical Structure. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (9):363-364.score: 72.0
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  47. Leslie Brothers & Michael J. Raleigh (1991). Simians, Space, and Syntax: Parallels Between Human Language and Primate Social Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 14 (4):613-614.score: 72.0
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  48. Curtis Carter, Syntax in Language and Painting.score: 72.0
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  49. Gilberto de Castro (2012). Toward a History of Forms of Utterance in Language Constructions (Study in the Applications of the Sociological Method to Problems of Syntax); Discourse in Life and Discourse in Art-Concerning Sociological Poetics. Bakhtiniana 7 (1):270 - 275.score: 72.0
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  50. Gillian R. Hart (1990). Studies on Latin Syntax Gualtiero Calboli (Ed.): Subordination and Other Topics in Latin: Proceedings of the Third Colloquium on Latin Linguistics, Bologna, 1–5 April 1985. (Studies in Language Companion Series, 17.) Pp. Xxix + 691. Amsterdam and Philadelphia: John Benjamins, 1989. Fl. 215 ($96). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 40 (02):335-337.score: 72.0
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