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  1.  5
    D. C. Feeney (1987). Vergil's 'Meaning' A. J. Boyle: The Chaonian Dove. Studies in the Eclogues, Georgics and Aeneid of Virgil. (Mnemosyne Suppl. 94.) Pp. Xii+196. Leiden: Brill, 1986. Paper, Fl. 72. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 37 (02):171-173.
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  2.  21
    D. C. Feeney (1986). 'Stat Magni Nominis Umbra.' Lucan on the Greatness of Pompeius Magnus. Classical Quarterly 36 (01):239-.
    At the age of twenty-five, Gn. Pompeius acquired the spectacular cognomen of Magnus. According to Plutarch , the name came either from the acclamation of his army in Africa, or at the instigation of Sulla. According to Livy, the practice began from the toadying of Pompeius' circle . The cognomen invited play. At the Ludi Apollinares of July 59, Cicero tells us, the actor Diphilus won ‘a dozen encores’ when he pronounced, from a lost tragedy, the line ‘nostra miseria tu (...)
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  3.  11
    D. C. Feeney (1986). Werner Schubert: Jupiter in den Epen der Flavierzeit. (Studien Zur Klassischen Philologie, Bd. 8.) Pp. 352. Frankfurt Am Main, Berne, New York: Peter Lang, 1984. Paper, 68 Sw. Frs. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 36 (01):134-135.
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  4.  9
    D. C. Feeney (1993). Matthias Korn, Hans Jürgen Tschiedel: Ratis omnia vincet: Untersuchungen zu den Argonautica des Valerius Flaccus. (Spudasmata, 48.) Pp. 237. Hildesheim, Zürich and New York: Georg Olms, 1991. DM 44.80. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 43 (01):174-.
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  5.  9
    D. C. Feeney (1987). Jochem Küppers: Tantarum causas irarum. Untersuchungen zur einleitenden Bücherdyade der Punica des Silius Italicus. (Untersuchungen zur antiken Literatur und Geschichte, 23.) Pp. viii + 211. Berlin and New York: de Gruyter, 1986. DM 98. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 37 (02):306-307.
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  6.  8
    D. C. Feeney (1992). Rehabilitating Imperial Literature A. J. Boyle (Ed.): The Imperial Muse: Ramus Essays on Roman Literature of the Empire: Flavian Epicist to Claudian. Pp. Vi + 318. Bentleigh, Victoria: Aureal Publications, 1990. Paper, A$ 45.75. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (02):323-324.
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  7.  9
    D. C. Feeney (1985). Erich Burck: Historische und epische Tradition bei Silius Italicus. (Zetemata, 80.) Pp. vii+179. Munich: C. H. Beck, 1984. Paper, DM. 54. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 35 (02):390-391.
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  8.  8
    D. C. Feeney (1992). David West (Tr.): Virgil: The Aeneid, a New Prose Translation. (Penguin Classics.) Pp. Xiv + 353; 2 Maps. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1990. Paper, £4.99. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 42 (01):191-192.
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  9.  7
    D. C. Feeney (1983). J. Volpilhac, P. Miniconi, G. Devallet: Silius Italicus, La Guerre Punique. Tome II, Livres V–VIII. (Collection Budé.) Pp. Ix + 187 (Text Double); 3 Maps. Paris: Les Belles Lettres, 1981. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 33 (02):322-323.
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  10.  7
    D. C. Feeney (1987). Vergil's 'Meaning'. The Classical Review 37 (02):171-.
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  11.  4
    D. C. Feeney (1984). The Reconciliations of Juno. Classical Quarterly 34 (01):179-.
    The reconciliation between Juno and Jupiter at the end of the Aeneid forms the cap to the divine action of the poem. The scene is conventionally regarded as the resolution of the heavenly discord that has prevailed since the first book; in particular, it is normal to see here a definitive transformation of Juno, as she abandons, her enmity once and for all, committing herself wholeheartedly to the Roman cause. So G. Lieberg, for example: ‘I due emisferi di Giove e (...)
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