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Profile: D. Gene Witmer (University of Florida)
  1. D. Gene Witmer, William Butchard & Kelly Trogdon (2005). Intrinsicality Without Naturalness. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 70 (2):326–350.
    Rae Langton and David Lewis have proposed an account of "intrinsic property" that makes use of two notions: being independent of accompaniment and being natural. We find the appeal to the first of these promising; the second notion, however, we find mystifying. In this paper we argue that the appeal to naturalness is not acceptable and offer an alternative definition of intrinsicality. The alternative definition makes crucial use of a notion commonly used by philosophers, namely, the notion of one property (...)
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  2. Carl Gillett & D. Gene Witmer (2001). A "Physical" Need: Physicalism and the Via Negativa. Analysis 61 (272):302–309.
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  3.  23
    D. Gene Witmer (2003). Functionalism and Causal Exclusion. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 84 (2):198-215.
    Recent work by Jaegwon Kim and others suggest that functionalism leaves mental properties causally inefficacious in some sense. I examine three lines of argument for this conclusion. The first appeals to Occam's Razor; the second appeals to a ban on overdetermination; and the third charges that the kind of response I favor to these arguments forces me to give up "the homogeneity of mental and physical causation". I show how each argument fails. While I concede that a positive theory of (...)
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  4.  86
    D. Gene Witmer (2006). How to Be a (Sort of) A Priori Physicalist. Philosophical Studies 131 (1):185-225.
    What has come to be known as “a priori physicalism” is the thesis, roughly, that the non-physical truths in the actual world can be deduced a priori from a complete physical description of the actual world. To many contemporary philosophers, a priori physicalism seems extremely implausible. In this paper I distinguish two kinds of a priori physicalism. One sort – strict a priori physicalism – I reject as both unmotivated and implausible. The other sort – liberal a priori physicalism – (...)
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  5.  7
    Carl Gillett & D. Gene Witmer (2001). A 'Physical' Need: Physicalism and the Via Negativa. Analysis 61 (4):302-309.
  6.  38
    D. Gene Witmer (2012). Stalking the Elusive Physicalist Thesis. Metascience 21 (1):71-75.
    Stalking the elusive physicalist thesis Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-5 DOI 10.1007/s11016-011-9528-2 Authors D. Gene Witmer, Department of Philosophy, University of Florida, P. O. Box 118545, Gainesville, FL 32611-8545, USA Journal Metascience Online ISSN 1467-9981 Print ISSN 0815-0796.
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  7.  40
    D. Gene Witmer (1999). Supervenience Physicalism and the Problem of Extras. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):315-31.
  8.  50
    D. Gene Witmer (2000). Locating the Overdetermination Problem. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (2):273-286.
    Physicalists motivate their position by posing a problem for the opposition: given the causal completeness of physics and the impact of the mental (or, more broadly, the seemingly nonphysical) on the physical, antiphysicalism implies that causal overdetermination is rampant. This argument is, however, equivocal in its use of 'physical'. As Scott Sturgeon has recently argued, if 'physical' means that which is the object of physical theory, completeness is plausible, but the further claim that the mental has a causal impact on (...)
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  9.  17
    D. Gene Witmer (2007). Necessity, Identity, and A Priori Access. Philosophical Topics 35 (1/2):241-263.
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  10.  13
    D. Gene Witmer (1999). Supervenience Physicalism and the Problem of Extras. Southern Journal of Philosophy 37 (2):315-331.
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  11.  54
    D. Gene Witmer (2006). Review: Physicalism, or Something Near Enough. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (460):1136-1141.
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  12. D. Gene Witmer (2001). Sufficiency Claims and Physicalism: A Formulation. In Carl Gillett & Barry M. Loewer (eds.), Physicalism and its Discontents. Cambridge University Press
     
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  13.  45
    D. Gene Witmer (2003). Dupre's Anti-Essentialist Objection to Reductionism. Philosophical Quarterly 53 (211):181-200.
    In his 'The Disorder of Things' John Dupré presents an objection to reductionism which I call the 'anti-essentialist objection': it is that reductionism requires essentialism, and essentialism is false. I unpack the objection and assess its cogency. Once the objection is clearly in view, it is likely to appeal to those who think conceptual analysis a bankrupt project. I offer on behalf of the reductionist two strategies for responding, one which seeks to rehabilitate conceptual analysis and one (more concessive) which (...)
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  14.  10
    D. Gene Witmer (2003). Multiple Realizability and Psychological Laws: Evaluating Kim's Challenge. In Sven Walter & Heinz-Dieter Heckmann (eds.), Physicalism and Mental Causation. Imprint Academic 59.
  15.  45
    D. Gene Witmer (2000). From Metaphysics to Ethics: A Defence of Conceptual Analysis. Philosophical Review 109 (3):459-462.
    Conceptual analysis is currently out of favour, especially in North America. This is partly through misunderstanding of its nature. Properly understood, conceptual analysis is not a mysterious activity discredited by Quine that seeks after the a priori in some hard‐to‐understand sense. It is, rather, something familiar to everyone, philosophers and non‐philosophers alike—or so I argue. Another reason for its unpopularity is a failure to appreciate the need for conceptual analysis. The cost of repudiating it has not been sufficiently appreciated; without (...)
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  16.  18
    D. Gene Witmer (2014). The Conceptual Link From Physical to Mental By Robert Kirk. Analysis 74 (3):552-556.
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  17.  17
    D. Gene Witmer (forthcoming). The Conceptual Link From Physical to Mental By Robert Kirk. Analysis:anu048.
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  18.  9
    D. Gene Witmer (2004). Christopher S. Hill, Thought and World: An Austere Portrayal of Truth, Reference, and Semantic Correspondence. Philosophical Inquiry 26 (4):142-145.
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  19.  25
    D. Gene Witmer & John Sarnecki (1998). Is Natural Kindness a Natural Kind? Philosophical Studies 90 (3):245-264.
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  20.  39
    D. Gene Witmer (2011). Review Of: Timothy Williamson, The Philosophy of Philosophy. Metaphilosophy 42 (1-2):155-160.
  21.  23
    D. Gene Witmer (1998). What is Wrong with the Manifestability Argument for Supervenience? Australasian Journal of Philosophy 76 (1):84-89.
    The manifestability argument presented by Papineau and Loewer turns on the premise that nonphysical properties are capable of making a difference to physical conditions. From this and the completeness of physics a strenuous supervenience conclusion is supposed to follow. I argue that the plausible version of this premise implies a weaker supervenience thesis only, one that is too weak to be of any use for a physicalist. There is a more contentious premise one might use to deduce the needed conclusion, (...)
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  22.  28
    D. Gene Witmer (2011). Being Reduced: New Essays on Reduction, Explanation, and Causation, Edited by Jakob Hohwy and Jesper Kallestrup. Mind 120 (479):882-888.
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  23.  4
    D. Gene Witmer (2014). A Simple Theory of Intrinsicality. In Robert M. Francescotti (ed.), Companion to Intrinsic Properties. De Gruyter 111-138.
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  24.  40
    D. Gene Witmer (2004). Review of Andrew Melnyk, A Physicalist Manifesto: Thoroughly Modern Materialism. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2004 (6).
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  25. D. Gene Witmer (2001). Conceptual Analysis, Circularity, and the Commitments of Physicalism. Acta Analytica 16 (26):119-133.
  26.  20
    Crystal Thorpe & D. Gene Witmer (2001). Brad Hooker and Margaret Olivia Little , Moral Particularism, Oxford, Clarendon Press, 2000, Pp. Xiv + 317. Utilitas 13 (3):369.
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  27.  25
    D. Gene Witmer (2009). Review of Christopher Peacocke, Truly Understood. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2009 (6).
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  28. D. Gene Witmer (2001). Experience, Appearance, and Hidden Features. Psyche 7 (9).
    Charles Siewert has given us an ingenious thought experiment involving a limited lack of conscious experience. The possibility of the described case is incompatible with a number of popular theories of consciousness. Siewert acknowledges, however, that this possibility is not a direct threat to "hidden feature" theories. I aim to do two things: first, strengthen his defense of the claim that the case is genuinely possible by considering and rejecting some further attempts to explain away our temptation to believe it (...)
     
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  29.  18
    D. Gene Witmer (2008). Review of Steven Horst, Beyond Reduction: Philosophy of Mind and Post-Reductionist Philosophy of Science. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (4).
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  30. Brian McLaughlin & D. Gene Witmer (1993). Tim Crane, Ed., The Contents of Experience: Essays on Perception Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 13 (1):8-13.
     
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  31. Brian Mclaughlin & D. Gene Witmer (1993). Tim Crane, Ed., The Contents of Experience: Essays on Perception. [REVIEW] Philosophy in Review 13:8-13.
     
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  32. D. Gene Witmer (2012). Naturalism and Physicalism. In Robert Barnard & Neil Manson (eds.), Continuum Companion to Metaphysics. 90-120.
    A substantial guide providing an overview of both physicalism and metaphysical naturalism, reviewing both questions of formulation and justification for both doctrines. Includes a diagnostic strategy for understanding talk of naturalism as a metaphysical thesis.
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  33. D. Gene Witmer (2011). On Making Everything Boring. Florida Philosophical Review 11 (1):1-16.
    The title of my address is inspired by an experience I have found to be common among philosophers. I have in the mind the following process. At the start of a project, the issue at hand seems compelling and you hope to have something significant to say about it. If all goes well, you find ways of mapping out the terrain that make it easier and easier to see what to say. And as you near the end of the process, (...)
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  34. D. Gene Witmer (2003). Review Of: Michael Rea, World Without Design: The Ontological Consequences of Naturalism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (4):603.