Search results for 'D. Heard' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. D. Heard (2006). A New Problem for Ontological Emergence. Philosophical Quarterly 56 (222):55-62.score: 240.0
    It is becoming increasingly common to find phenomena described as emergent. There are two sorts of philosophical analysis of emergence. Ontological analyses ground emergence in real, distinct, emergent properties. Epistemological analyses deny emergent properties and stress instead facts about our epistemic status. I review a standard worry for ontological analyses of emergence, that they entail a surfeit of metaphysics, and find that it can easily be sidestepped. I go on to present a new worry, that ontological emergentism entails a highly (...)
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  2. L. J. Southgate, S. R. Heard, P. D. Toon & M. R. Salkind (1987). Teaching Medical Ethics Symposium. A Student-Led Approach to Teaching. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (3):139-143.score: 240.0
    It is increasingly agreed that ethics has a place in undergraduate medical education. There is, however, debate about how it should be taught, and by whom. We present our experience of teaching ethics in a general practice module over six years. During this period there has been a shift from a teacher-centred to a student-centred approach in which students choose ethical issues to explore within a framework provided. The issues raised are discussed with examples, and the future directions of our (...)
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  3. Robert Levine (1990). Mary Coker Joslin, The Heard Word, a Moralized History: The Genesis Section of the “Histoire Ancienne” in a Text From Saint-Jean d'Acre.(Romance Monographs, 45.) University, Miss.: Romance Monographs, 1986. Pp. 357. $45. [REVIEW] Speculum 65 (1):181-182.score: 120.0
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  4. Daniel D. Hutto (2005). Voices to Be Heard. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (1):149 – 161.score: 36.0
    Interpretations of Wittgenstein’s work notoriously fuel debate and controversy. This holds true not only with respect to its main messages, but also to questions concerning its unity and purpose. Tradition has it that his intellectual career can be best understood if carved in twain; that we can get a purchase on his thinking by focusing on and contrasting his, “two diametrically opposed philosophical masterpieces, the Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus (1921) and the Philosophical Investigations (1953)” (Hacker 2001, 1). This is allegedly justified by (...)
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  5. Sheri Alpert (2008). Privacy Issues in Clinical Genomic Medicine, or Marcus Welby, M.D., Meets the $1000 Genome. [REVIEW] Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 17 (04):373-384.score: 36.0
    We have all heard a refrain much like this one over the last decade, increasingly so, as the cost of genetic sequencing has been drastically reduced with improvements in associated techniques and technologies. Already, discoveries are being made in laboratories that can help doctors determine from which drug a particular patient will receive the most efficacious treatment. The working presumption is that, eventually, individuals’ genetic sequence information will be included in each of their personal medical records.
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  6. Anne D. Birdwmistell (1984). Knowledge Heard and Seen: The Attempt in Early Chinese Philosophy to Analyze Experteential Knowledge. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 11 (1):67-82.score: 36.0
  7. Donald D. Chipman & Carl B. McDonald (1980). The Historical Contributions of William Heard Kilpatrick. Journal of Thought 15 (1):71-83.score: 36.0
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  8. I. Berent, D. SteriaDe, T. LennerTz & V. Vaknin (2007). What We Know About What We Have Never Heard: Evidence From Perceptual Illusions☆. Cognition 104 (3):591-630.score: 36.0
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  9. Josephine Johnston (2005). Field Notes. Hastings Center Report 35 (2):pp. c2-c2.score: 30.0
    The theoretical value of talking to the media isn’t hard to appreciate. Who doesn’t want to shape the public conversation, whether to make it more nuanced and reasoned or to bring injustice and wrongdoing to light? Issues you’ve studied are in the news and you get to be the expert, pointing out what’s wrong, or right, or offering another way of thinking about a difficult question. If you’re lucky, you get your name in print—and in a publication your friends and (...)
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  10. Justin Leiber, Fritz Leiber.score: 30.0
               “I’ve written a story!†My eighty year old father’s rich, booming voice fired up the phone line, briefly burning through the fuzzy enunciation that stemmed from a minor stroke of three years back. It hadn’t been the stroke but rather his growing blindness that had slowed his production. Through dictation he’d still kept up his short monthly magazine column (in one of the last and most gravely scatological of these (...)
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  11. Suze G. Berkhout (2013). Private Talk: Testimony, Evidence, and the Practice Of Anonymization in Research. International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 6 (1):19-45.score: 24.0
    "Your confidentiality will be respected. Information that discloses your identity will not be released without your consent unless required by law or regulation." I sat there with Missy, reading the consent form line by line. When I got to the section on confidentiality, I told her she could pick a nickname, or fake name, that I would use in my research notes and later when the research was written up. She wanted to use "Missy." It wasn't exactly a pseudonym—this was (...)
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  12. Colin McLarty (2007). The Last Mathematician From Hilbert's Göttingen: Saunders Mac Lane as Philosopher of Mathematics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 58 (1):77-112.score: 24.0
    While Saunders Mac Lane studied for his D.Phil in Göttingen, he heard David Hilbert's weekly lectures on philosophy, talked philosophy with Hermann Weyl, and studied it with Moritz Geiger. Their philosophies and Emmy Noether's algebra all influenced his conception of category theory, which has become the working structure theory of mathematics. His practice has constantly affirmed that a proper large-scale organization for mathematics is the most efficient path to valuable specific results—while he sees that the question of which results (...)
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  13. Anna Papafragou, Children's Acquisition of Evidentiality.score: 24.0
    This paper is concerned with the acquisition of the semantics and pragmatics of evidentiality. Evidentiality markers encode the speaker’s source for the information being reported in the utterance. While languages like English express evidentiality in lexical markers (I saw that it was raining vs. I heard that it was raining), other languages grammaticalize evidentiality. In Turkish, for all instances of past reference there is an obligatory choice between the suffixes -DI (realized as –di, -dı, -du, -dü, -ti, -tı, -tu, (...)
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  14. Brian Weatherson, Probability in Philosophy.score: 24.0
    I’m not sure how much knowledge everyone already has, so I’d like to start with a little questionnaire. On a card, say for each of the following topics whether you’re familiar with the topic, have heard of it but aren’t familiar with it, or have never heard of it.
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  15. Anna Papafragou, The Acquisition of Evidentiality and Source Monitoring.score: 24.0
    Evidential markers encode the source of a speaker’s knowledge. While some languages express evidentiality by lexical markers (e.g. I saw that it was raining vs. I heard that it was raining), about a quarter of world’s languages grammaticalize evidentiality through specialized markers. For instance, Turkish obligatorily marks all instances of past reference with one of the following two suffixes: -DI (the neutral form, which denotes the past of direct experience and is realized as –di, -dı, -du, -dü, -ti, (...)
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  16. David Pesetsky, Phrasal Movement and its Kin.score: 24.0
    The investigations reported here are the result of three lucky events. The first occurred in 1986. I had recently done the work reported in Pesetsky (1987), and received in the mail a copy of Kiss (1986). Since I had argued at length that D-linked wh-phrases do not display Superiority effects. I was astonished by a paradigm reported by Kiss, which appears here as example (98). These facts remained stubbornly in my mind for the next decade as an unsolved puzzle. Kiss (...)
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  17. Felipe W. Martinez, Nancy Fumero & Ben Segal (2013). Grande Sertão: Veredas by João Guimarães Rosa. Continent 3 (1):27-43.score: 24.0
    INTRODUCTION BY NANCY FUMERO What is a translation that stalls comprehension? That, when read, parsed, obfuscates comprehension through any language – English, Portuguese. It is inevitable that readers expect fidelity from translations. That language mirror with a sort of precision that enables the reader to become of another location, condition, to grasp in English in a similar vein as readers of Portuguese might from João Guimarães Rosa’s GRANDE SERTÃO: VEREDAS. There is the expectation that translations enable mobility. That what was (...)
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  18. Gary J. Shipley & Nicola Masciandaro (2012). Open Commentary to Eugene Thacker's" Cosmic Pessimism". Continent 2 (2):76-81.score: 24.0
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 76–81 Comments on Eugene Thacker’s “Cosmic Pessimism” Nicola Masciandaro Anything you look forward to will destroy you, as it already has. —Vernon Howard In pessimism, the first axiom is a long, low, funereal sigh. The cosmicity of the sigh resides in its profound negative singularity. Moving via endless auto-releasement, it achieves the remote. “ Oltre la spera che piú larga gira / passa ’l sospiro ch’esce del mio core ” [Beyond the sphere that circles widest / penetrates (...)
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  19. Berit Soli-Holt & Isaac Linder (2013). The Call of The Wild: Terro(I)R Modulations. Continent 3 (2):60-65.score: 24.0
    This piece, included in the drift special issue of continent. , was created as one step in a thread of inquiry. While each of the contributions to drift stand on their own, the project was an attempt to follow a line of theoretical inquiry as it passed through time and the postal service(s) from October 2012 until May 2013. This issue hosts two threads: between space & place and between intention & attention . The editors recommend that to experience the (...)
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  20. Paul Boshears (2011). Orbital Contour: Videos by Craig Dongoski. Continent 1 (2):125-128.score: 24.0
    continent. 1.2 (2011): 125-128. What is the nature of sound? What is the nature of volume? William James, in attempting to address these simple questions wrote, “ The voluminousness of the feeling seems to bear very little relation to the size of the ocean that yields it . The ear and eye are comparatively minute organs, yet they give us feelings of great volume” (203-­4, itals. original). This subtle extensivity of sensation finds its peer in the subtle yet significant influence (...)
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  21. Samuel Vriezen (2012). The Poetry of Jeroen Mettes. Continent 2 (1):22-28.score: 24.0
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 22–28. Jeroen Mettes burst onto the Dutch poetry scene twice. First, in 2005, when he became a strong presence on the nascent Dutch poetry blogosphere overnight as he embarked on his critical project Dichtersalfabet (Poet’s Alphabet). And again in 2011, when to great critical acclaim (and some bafflement) his complete writings were published – almost five years after his far too early death. 2005 was the year in which Dutch poetry blogging exploded. That year saw the foundation (...)
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  22. [deleted]Giosuè Baggio Andrea Pavan, Māris Skujevskis (2013). Motion Words Selectively Modulate Direction Discrimination Sensitivity for Threshold Motion. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 24.0
    Can speech selectively modulate the sensitivity of a sensory system so that, in the presence of a suitable linguistic context, the discrimination of certain perceptual features becomes more or less likely? In this study, participants heard upward or downward motion words followed by a single visual field of random dots moving upwards or downwards. The time interval between the onsets of the auditory and the visual stimuli was varied parametrically. Motion direction could be either discriminable (suprathreshold motion) or non-discriminable (...)
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  23. Sascha Talmor (2004). The Life and Passion of Artemisia1. The European Legacy 9 (2):213-230.score: 24.0
    When reading Susan Vreeland's novel The Passion of Artemisia, we find ourselves in seventeenth century Renaissance Italy and the social life of Artemisia d'Orazio Gentileschi, a woman painter who was raped, tortured by the Inquisition and due to her fine and original paintings, was the first woman painter to become a member of the famous Accademia del Disegno. In sum, she struggled for her personal and artistic liberation long before anyone in Europe had heard about feminism. Moreover, Artemisia is (...)
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  24. J. D. Trout (2013). Democracy and Scientific Expertise: Illusions of Political and Epistemic Inclusion. Synthese 190 (7):1267-1291.score: 12.0
    Realizing the ideal of democracy requires political inclusion for citizens. A legitimate democracy must give citizens the opportunity to express their attitudes about the relative attractions of different policies, and access to political mechanisms through which they can be counted and heard. Actual governance often aims not at accurate belief, but at nonepistemic factors like achieving and maintaining institutional stability, creating the feeling of government legitimacy among citizens, or managing access to influence on policy decision-making. I examine the traditional (...)
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  25. D. H. Mellor, Inaugural Lecture: The Warrant of Induction.score: 12.0
    This lecture will last less than twenty four hours. I know that, and so do you. And you knew it before I said so. How? Because you knew that lectures don't last twenty four hours. How do you know that? You haven't heard this one, and 'for all you know' (as the saying is) I could go on all night. But you know I won't. And the 'all you know' which tells you that, without entailing it, is the fact (...)
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  26. A. I͡U Aĭkhenvalʹd (2004). Evidentiality. Oxford University Press.score: 12.0
    In some languages every statement must contain a specification of the type of evidence on which it is based: for example, whether the speaker saw it, or heard it, or inferred it from indirect evidence, or learnt it from someone else. This grammatical reference to information source is called 'evidentiality', and is one of the least described grammatical categories. Evidentiality systems differ in how complex they are: some distinguish just two terms (eyewitness and noneyewitness, or reported and everything else), (...)
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