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David Michael Levin [48]Daniel T. Levin [17]David Levin [8]D. M. Levin [5]
David S. Levin [5]Daniel N. Levin [3]Dan Levin [2]Daniel Lessard Levin [2]

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  1. Lewis J. Baker & Daniel T. Levin (2015). The Role of Relational Triggers in Event Perception. Cognition 136:14-29.
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  2. Daniel T. Levin (2012). Concepts About Agency Constrain Beliefs About Visual Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (2):875-888.
    Recent research exploring phenomena such as change blindness, inattentional blindness, attentional blink and repetition blindness has revealed a number of counterintuitive ways in which apparently salient visual stimuli often go unnoticed. In fact, large majorities of subjects sometimes predict that they would detect visual changes that actually are rarely noticed, suggesting that people have strong beliefs about visual experience that are demonstrably incorrect. However, for other kinds of visual metacognition, such as picture memory, people underpredict performance. This paper describes two (...)
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  3. David Levin (2011). Sites of Vision: The Discursive Construction of Sight in the History of Philosophy. Feminist Studies 37 (1).
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  4. David Michael Levin (2009). Experience and Description in the Moral Phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty and Levinas. In Robert Vallier, Wayne Jeffrey Froman & Bernard Flynn (eds.), Merleau-Ponty and the Possibilities of Philosophy: Transforming the Tradition. State University of New York Press.
  5. David Michael Levin (2009). On Civilized Cruelty. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (1/2):72-94.
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  6. M. Beck, B. Angelone, D. Levin, M. Peterson & D. Varakin (2008). Implicit Learning for Probable Changes in a Visual Change Detection Task. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (4):1192-1208.
    Previous research demonstrates that implicitly learned probability information can guide visual attention. We examined whether the probability of an object changing can be implicitly learned and then used to improve change detection performance. In a series of six experiments, participants completed 120–130 training change detection trials. In four of the experiments the object that changed color was the same shape on every trial. Participants were not explicitly aware of this change probability manipulation and change detection performance was not improved for (...)
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  7. Jonathan S. Herberg, Megan M. Saylor, Palis Ratanaswasd, Daniel T. Levin & D. Mitchell Wilkes (2008). Audience‐Contingent Variation in Action Demonstrations for Humans and Computers. Cognitive Science 32 (6):1003-1020.
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  8. Dov Levin (2008). Why Following the Rules Matters: The Customs of War and the Case of the Texas War of Independence. Journal of Military Ethics 7 (2):116-135.
    It is commonly assumed that the pre-codified, customary law of war had little true influence on the decisions or behavior of combatants in the western world. Evaluating this assumption concerning the custom (or norm) of the giving of quarter to enemy combatants in the Texas War of Independence of 1835--1836, this paper finds a strong and widely accepted norm on this subject already by the early 19th century, which exerted significant influence on the behavior in and the results and consequences (...)
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  9. Tom L. Beauchamp, Baruch Brody, Marion Danis, Samia A. See Hurst, David Degrazia, Must We Have, Alber W. Dzur, Daniel Levin, Daniel M. Fox & Diane Gianelli (2007). By Author. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (4):405-407.
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  10. Melissa R. Beck, Daniel T. Levin & Bonnie L. Angelone (2007). Change Blindness Blindness: Beliefs About the Roles of Intention and Scene Complexity in Change Detection. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (1):31-51.
    Observers have difficulty detecting visual changes. However, they are unaware of this inability, suggesting that people do not have an accurate understanding of visual processes. We explored whether this error is related to participants’ beliefs about the roles of intention and scene complexity in detecting changes. In Experiment 1 participants had a higher failure rate for detecting changes in an incidental change detection task than an intentional change detection task. This effect of intention was greatest for complex scenes. However, participants (...)
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  11. Melissa R. Beck, Daniel T. Levin & Bonnie L. Angelone (2007). Metacognitive Errors in Change Detection: Lab and Life Converge. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (1):58-62.
    Smilek, Eastwood, Reynolds, and Kingstone suggests that the studies reported in Beck, M. R., Levin, D. T. and Angelone, B. A. are not ecologically valid. Here, we argue that not only are change blindness and change blindness blindness studies in general ecologically valid, but that the studies we reported in Beck, Levin, and Angelone, 2007 are as well. Specifically, we suggest that many of the changes used in our study could reasonably be expected to occur in the real world. Furthermore, (...)
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  12. Albert W. Dzur & Daniel Lessard Levin (2007). The Primacy of the Public: In Support of Bioethics Commissions as Deliberative Forums. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 17 (2):133-142.
    : In a 2004 article, we argued that bioethics commissions should be assessed in terms of their usefulness as public forums. A 2006 article by Summer Johnson argued that our perspective was not supported by the existing literature on presidential commissions, which had not previously identified commissions as public forums and that we did not properly account for the political functions of commissions as instruments of presidential power. Johnson also argued that there was nothing sufficiently unique about bioethics commissions to (...)
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  13. John O. Agwunobi, Sara Feigenholtz, Donna E. Levin, Robert E. Ragland, Joseph M. Henderson & Frederic E. Shaw (2004). Are You Ready for the Next Outbreak? An Exercise in Legal Preparedness. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (s4):77-78.
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  14. Matthew Brown, Derek Besner, Daniel T. Levin & Donald A. Varakin (2004). Larry Cahill, Lukasz Gorski, Annabelle Belcher, and Quyen Huynh. The Influence of Sex Versus Sex-Related Traits on Long-Term. Consciousness and Cognition 13:212.
  15. Albert W. Dzur & Daniel Lessard Levin (2004). The "Nation's Conscience:" Assessing Bioethics Commissions as Public Forums. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 14 (4):333-360.
    : As the fifth national bioethics commission has concluded its work and a sixth is currently underway, it is time to step back and consider appropriate measures of success. This paper argues that standard measures of commissions' influence fail to fully assess their role as public forums. From the perspective of democratic theory, a critical dimension of this role is public engagement: the ability of a commission to address the concerns of the general public, to learn how average citizens resolve (...)
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  16. Daniel T. Levin & D. Alexander Varakin (2004). No Pause for a Brief Disruption: Failures of Visual Awareness During Ongoing Events. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):363-372.
    Past research has repeatedly documented the close relationship between visual attention and awareness. Most recently, research exploring change blindness, inattentional blindness, repetition blindness, and the attentional blink has converged on the conclusion that attention to one aspect of a scene or event may lead to a highly circumscribed awareness of only the specific information attended, while other information, even that which is spatially or temporally nearby can go completely unnoticed. In the present report, we extend these observations to the dynamic (...)
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  17. Steve Mitroff, Daniel J. Simons & Daniel T. Levin (2004). Nothing Compares 2 Views: Change Blindness Results From Failures to Compare Retained Information. Perception and Psychophysics 66 (8):1268-1281.
  18. D. Alexander Varakin, Daniel T. Levin & Roger Fidler (2004). Unseen and Unaware: Implications of Recent Research on Failures of Visual Awareness for Human-Computer Interface Design. Human-Computer Interaction 19 (4):389-422.
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  19. Bonnie L. Angelone, Daniel T. Levin & Daniel J. Simons (2003). The Relationship Between Change Detection and Recognition of Centrally Attended Objects in Motion Pictures. Perception 32 (8):947-962.
  20. Georg Kell & David Levin (2003). The Global Compact Network: An Historic Experiment in Learning and Action. Business and Society Review 108 (2):151-181.
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  21. David Michael Levin (2003). Cinders, Traces, Shadows on the Page. International Philosophical Quarterly 43 (3):269-288.
    In this paper I examine important texts by Jacques Derrida in which, either implicitly or explicitly, the Shoah, the catastrophe of the Holocaust is signified, interrupting, disrupting, even disfiguring the texture of the text. The question is how appropriately to remember and mourn the dead within philosophical discourse, how to remember what happened and how to understand it as a question not only of ethical and political responsibility but also as an evil deeply and pervasively reflected in the ontology and (...)
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  22. D. T. Levin, S. B. Drivdahl, N. Momen & M. R. Beck (2002). False Predictions About the Detectability of Unexpected Visual Changes: The Role of Metamemory and Beliefs About Attention in Causing Change Blindness Blindness. Consciousness and Cognition 11:507-527.
     
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  23. Daniel T. Levin (2002). Change Blindness Blindness as Visual Metacognition. Journal of Consciousness Studies 9 (5-6):111-30.
    Many experiments have demonstrated that people fail to detect seemingly large visual changes in their environment. Despite these failures, most people confidently predict that they would see changes that are actually almost impossible to see. Therefore, in at least some situations visual experience is demonstrably not what people think it is. This paper describes a line of research suggesting that overconfidence about change detection reflects a deeper metacognitive error founded on beliefs about attention and the role of meaning as a (...)
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  24. Daniel T. Levin, Sarah B. Drivdahl, Nausheen Momen & Melissa R. Beck (2002). False Predictions About the Detectability of Visual Changes: The Role of Beliefs About Attention, Memory, and the Continuity of Attended Objects in Causing Change Blindness Blindness. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):507-527.
    Recently, a number of experiments have emphasized the degree to which subjects fail to detect large changes in visual scenes. This finding, referred to as “change blindness,” is often considered surprising because many people have the intuition that such changes should be easy to detect. Levin, Momen, Drivdahl, and Simons documented this intuition by showing that the majority of subjects believe they would notice changes that are actually very rarely detected. Thus subjects exhibit a metacognitive error we refer to as (...)
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  25. Daniel T. Levin, Daniel J. Simons, Bonnie L. Angelone & Christopher Chabris (2002). Memory for Centrally Attended Changing Objects in an Incidental Real-World Change Detection Paradigm. British Journal of Psychology 93:289-302.
  26. David Michael Levin (2002). On Civilized Cruelty: Nietzsche on the Disciplinary Practices of Western Culture. New Nietzsche Studies 5 (1/2):72-94.
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  27. D. M. Levin (2001). The Embodiment of the Categorical Imperative: Kafka, Foucault, Benjamin, Adorno and Levinas. Philosophy and Social Criticism 27 (4):1-20.
    This study undertakes a hermeneutical reading of some texts in which the question of the embodiment of the categorical imperative, the responsibility enjoined by the procedural form of the moral law, is introduced. It is hoped that this reading will contribute to our understanding of the body of experience, the so-called body-subject, showing the body to be not only an object-body, not only, as in the work of Foucault, a material substratum for the application of power, but also, as Levinas (...)
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  28. David Michael Levin (2001). [Book Review] the Philosopher's Gaze, Modernity in the Shadows of Enlightenment. [REVIEW] Social Theory and Practice 27 (3):501-518.
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  29. David Michael Levin (2001). Los filósofos y la danza. A Parte Rei: Revista de Filosofía 14:7.
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  30. David Michael Levin (2001). What Measure Now? A Survivor's Reflections on the Holocaust. Philosophy Today 45 (2):175-186.
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  31. Paul Skokowski, Daniel J. Simons, Christopher F. Chabris, Tatiana Schnur, Daniel T. Levin, Boris Kotchoubey, Andrea Kübler, Ute Strehl, Niels Birbaumer & Jürgen Fell (2001). Nachshon Meiran, Bernhard Hommel, Uri Bibi, and Idit Lev. Consciousness and Control in Task. Consciousness and Cognition 10:598.
     
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  32. Daniel T. Levin, Nausheen Momen, Sarah B. Drivdahl & Daniel J. Simons (2000). Change Blindness Blindness: The Metacognitive Error of Overestimating Change-Detection Ability. Visual Cognition 7 (1):397-412.
  33. Frank C. Keil, Daniel T. Levin, Bethany A. Richman & Grant Gutheil (1999). Mechanism and Explanation in the Development of Biological Thought: The Case of Disease. In D. Medin & S. Atran (eds.), Folkbiology. Mit Press.
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  34. David Michael Levin (1999). A Reading of Neumann and Merleau-Ponty. In Roger Brooke (ed.), Pathways Into the Jungian World: Phenomenology and Analytical Psychology. Routledge.
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  35. David Michael Levin (1999). A Responsive Voice. Chiasmi International 1:65-102.
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  36. David Michael Levin (1999). The Ontological Dimension of Embodiment: Heidegger's Thinking of Being. In Simon Critchley (ed.), The Body: Classic and Contemporary Readings. Blackwell Publishers.
     
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  37. David Michael Levin (1999). Una voce in risposta (riassunto). Chiasmi International 1:103-103.
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  38. David Michael Levin (1999). Une voix qui répond (résumé). Chiasmi International 1:103-103.
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  39. David Michael Levin (1998). Singing the World: Merleau-Ponty's Phenomenology of Language. Philosophy Today 42 (3):319-336.
    Drawing on Merleau-Ponty's recognition of a prepersonal stage and dimension of our embodied experience to carry forward his phenomenology of language, this essay elaborates the significance of Merleau-Ponty's phrase "singing the world" and gives new inspiration to the metaphysical longing for a revelation of the "origin" of language, displacing this "origin" from its mythic sites to let it be heard within our experience of speaking. This experience is both diachronic (stages) and synchronic (structural dimensions): first, our prepersonal attunement to the (...)
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  40. David Michael Levin (1998). Tracework: Myself and Others in the Moral Phenomenology of Merleau-Ponty and Levinas. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 6 (3):345 – 392.
    In this study, I examine the significance of the trace and its legibility in the phenomenologies of Merleau-Ponty and Levinas, showing that this trope plays a more significant role in Merleau-Ponty's thinking than has been recognized heretofore and that it constitutes a crucial point of contact between Merleau-Ponty and Levinas. But this point of contact is also, in both their philosophies, a site where their thinking is compelled to confront its limits and the enigmas involved in the description of the (...)
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  41. David Levin (ed.) (1997). Language Beyond Postmodernism: Saying and Thinking in Gendlin Philosophy. Northwestern University Press.
    Eugene Gendlin's contribution to the theory of language is the focus of this collection of essays edited by David Michael Levin.
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  42. David Michael Levin (1997). Critical Comments On Hatab's A Nietzschean Defense of Democracy. New Nietzsche Studies 2 (1-2):123-134.
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  43. David Michael Levin (1997). Liberating Experience From the Vice of Structuralism: The Methods of Merleau-Ponty and Nagarjuna. Philosophy Today 41 (1):96-111.
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  44. Daniel J. Simons & Daniel T. Levin (1997). Change Blindness. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (1):241-82.
  45. Alan E. Tomkinson & David S. Levin (1997). Mammalian DNA Ligases. Bioessays 19 (10):893-901.
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  46. D. M. Levin (1996). What-Is? On Mimesis and the Logic of Identity and Difference in Heidegger and the Frankfurt School. International Studies in Philosophy 28 (4):41-60.
  47. David Michael Levin (1996). What-Is? International Studies in Philosophy 28 (4):41-60.
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  48. David Michael Levin (1995). Samuel Judah Todes 1927-1994. Proceedings and Addresses of the American Philosophical Association 69 (2):115 - 116.
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  49. David Michael Levin (1994). Making Sense: The Work of Eugene Gendlin. [REVIEW] Human Studies 17 (3):343 - 353.
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  50. Dm Levin (1994). Making Sense-the Work of Gendlin, Eugene. Human Studies 17 (3):343-353.
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