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D. Z. Phillips [140]David Phillips [40]D. C. Phillips [37]Derek L. Phillips [8]
Dawn M. Phillips [8]Dayton Z. Phillips [3]Donald F. Phillips [3]Denis Charles Phillips [2]

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Profile: David Phillips
Profile: David Phillips
Profile: David Phillips (University of Houston)
Profile: Dawn M Wilson (nee Phillips) (University of Hull)
  1. Dawn M. Phillips, Reading Literature and Doing Philosophy.
    In this paper I make a comparison between the imaginative activity of reading literature and the elucidatory activity of doing philosophy. My aim is to highlight significant features of a non-traditional view of philosophical method – inspired by Wittgenstein.
     
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  2. Dawn M. Phillips, Authorship, Responsibility and Denial.
    I examine a collection of different issues: language-use, authorship, responsibility, persons and first-person self-reference (the use of the term “I”). I begin by explaining why these separate issues have seized my imagination. Then I talk about some connections that I think we can make between the different issues and explain why these connections raise some philosophically interesting questions. I then focus on one specific issue – the question of whether or not an author can deny responsibility for his or her (...)
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  3. William Mahrt, Halsey Rayden, Herbert Lindenberger, Albert Gelpi, Gregson Davis, Diane Middlebrook, David Kennedy & Dennis Phillips (forthcoming). Statements Prepared for the Meeting of the Faculty Senate on 18 February, 1988. Minerva.
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  4. D. C. Phillips (forthcoming). On Castigating Constructivists. Philosophy of Education.
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  5. D. C. Phillips & C. B. J. Macmillan (forthcoming). The Hidden Curriculum and the Latent Functions of Schooling: Two Overlapping Perspectives. 1. Why the Hidden Curriculum is Hidden. Philosophy of Education: Proceedings of the Thirty-Sixth Annual Meeting of the Philosophy of Education Society.
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  6. Dr Mary Phillips, Mrs Jennifer Jackson Midgley, Piers Benn & Antony Flew (forthcoming). Puzzles and Posers. Cogito.
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  7. D. Z. Phillips (ed.) (2014). Moral Reasoning Vol 2. Routledge.
    First published in 2003. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  8. David Phillips (2014). Sympathy for the Error Theorist: Parfit and Mackie. [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 17 (3):559-566.
    Derek Parfit claims that “Williams and Mackie…do not use the normative concepts that I and other Non-Naturalists use.” Whatever we think of Parfit’s interpretation of Williams, his interpretation of Mackie should be rejected. For understandable historical reasons, Mackie’s texts are ambiguous. But if we apply to the interpretation of Mackie the same principle of charity Parfit employs in interpreting Williams, we find decisive reason to interpret Mackie as using the same normative concepts as Non-Naturalists.
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  9. David Phillips (2013). Replies to Crisp, Shaver and Skelton. Revue D’Études Benthamiennes 12.
    It is a great privilege to have one’s work critiqued by such a distinguished trio of philosophers and Sidgwick scholars. I owe further debts to Anthony and Rob, who were the OUP referees for my book. As will have been quite evident from the preceding discussion, they would not want to be held responsible for the book’s detailed contents, on which they gave me much excellent commentary. But, in thanking them here, I do want to say in particular that it (...)
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  10. David Phillips (2013). Sidgwickian Ethics – An Overview. Revue D’Études Benthamiennes 12.
    My aim in Sidgwickian Ethics is to interpret and evaluate the central argument of The Methods of Ethics, in a way that brings out the important conceptual and historical connections between Sidgwick’s views and contemporary moral philosophy. Sidgwick defines a “method of ethics” as “any rational procedure by which we determine what individual human beings ‘ought’ – or what it is ‘right’ for them – to do, or to seek to realise by voluntary action” (ME 1). He finds just three (...)
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  11. David J. Phillips (2013). R. Osborne Athens and Athenian Democracy. Pp. Xx + 462, Ills, Maps. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2010. Paper, £24.99, US$44 (Cased, £66, US$108). ISBN: 978-0-521-60570-0 (978-0-521-84421-5 Hbk). [REVIEW] The Classical Review 63 (2):500-502.
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  12. D. C. Phillips (2012). Dealing “Competently with the Serious Issues of the Day”: How Dewey (and Popper) Failed. Educational Theory 62 (2):125-142.
    In Reconstruction in Philosophy, John Dewey issued an eloquent call for contemporary philosophy to become more relevant to the pressing problems facing society. Historically, the philosophy of a period had been appropriate to social conditions (indeed, this is why it had developed as a discipline), but despite the vast changes in the contemporary world and the complex challenges confronting it philosophy had remained ossified. Karl Popper also was dissatisfied with contemporary philosophy, which he regarded as too often focusing upon “minute” (...)
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  13. David Phillips (2011). Sidgwickian Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Introduction -- Sidgwick's metaethics -- Sidgwick's moral epistemology -- Utilitarianism versus dogmatic intuitionism -- Utilitarianism versus egoism.
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  14. David Phillips (2011). Sidgwick on Promises. In Hanoch Sheinman (ed.), Promises and Agreements: Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.
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  15. David Phillips (2011). The Individual and the Social: A Comparative Study of Quality of Life, Social Quality and Human Development Approaches. International Journal of Social Quality 1 (1):71-89.
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  16. D. Z. Phillips (2010). God Remembers" or "Like Tears in Rain?". In Randy Ramal (ed.), Metaphysics, Analysis, and the Grammar of God: Process and Analytic Voices in Dialogue. Mohr Siebeck.
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  17. Diarmuid Costello & Dawn M. Phillips (2009). Automatism, Causality and Realism: Foundational Problems in the Philosophy of Photography. Philosophy Compass 4 (1):1-21.
    This article contains a survey of recent debates in the philosophy of photography, focusing on aesthetic and epistemic issues in particular. Starting from widespread notions about automatism, causality and realism in the theory of photography, the authors ask whether the prima facie tension between the epistemic and aesthetic embodied in oppositions such as automaticism and agency, causality and intentionality, realism and fictional competence is more than apparent. In this context, the article discusses recent work by Roger Scruton, Dominic Lopes, Kendall (...)
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  18. D. C. Phillips (2009). Empirical Educational Research : Charting Philosophical Disagreements in an Undisciplined Field. In Harvey Siegel (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Education. Oxford University Press.
     
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  19. D. Z. Phillips (2009). What Can I Know? In Steven M. Cahn (ed.), Exploring Philosophy: An Introductory Anthology. Oxford University Press.
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  20. Dawn M. Phillips (2009). Fixing the Image: Re-Thinking the 'Mind-Independence' of Photographs. Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 6 (2):1-22.
    We are told by philosophers that photographs are a distinct category of image because the photographic process is mind-independent. Furthermore, that the experience of viewing a photograph has a special status, justified by a viewer’s knowledge that the photographic process is mind-independent. Versions of these ideas are central to discussions of photography in both the philosophy of art and epistemology and have far-reaching implications for science, forensics and documentary journalism. Mind-independence (sometimes ‘belief independence’) is a term employed to highlight what (...)
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  21. Dawn M. Phillips (2009). Photography and Causation: Responding to Scruton's Scepticism. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (4):327-340.
    According to Roger Scruton, it is not possible for photographs to be representational art. Most responses to Scruton’s scepticism are versions of the claim that Scruton disregards the extent to which intentionality features in photography; but these cannot force him to give up his notion of the ideal photograph. My approach is to argue that Scruton has misconstrued the role of causation in his discussion of photography. I claim that although Scruton insists that the ideal photograph is defined by its (...)
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  22. D. C. Phillips, Philosophy of Education. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  23. Dana Phillips (2008). Investigating the Shared Background Required for Argument: A Critique of Fogelin's Thesis on Deep Disagreement. Informal Logic 28 (2):86-101.
    Robert Fogelin claims that interlocutors must share a framework of background beliefs and commitments in order to fruitfully pursue argument. I refute Fogelin’s claim by investigating more thoroughly the shared background required for productive argument. I find that this background consists not in any common beliefs regarding the topic at hand, but rather in certain shared pro-cedural commitments and competencies. I suggest that Fogelin and his supporters mistakenly view shared beliefs as part of the required background for productive argument because (...)
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  24. D. Z. Phillips (2007). William Hasker's Avoidance of the Problems of Evil and God (Or: On Looking Outside the Igloo). [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 62 (1):33 - 42.
    Our Book Review Editor, James Keller, invited William Hasker to write a review of the Book by D.Z. Phillips, The Problem of Evil and the Problem of God and then in consultation with the Editor-in-Chief invited Phillips to respond. Aware of both their respect for each other and their philosophical differences we planned that Hasker’s review and Phillips’ response would appear in the same issue of the International Journal for Philosophy of Religion. Unfortunately that was not to be. Dewi, as (...)
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  25. David Phillips (2007). Mackie on Practical Reason. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (5):457 - 468.
    I argue that John Mackie’s treatment of practical reason is both attractive and unjustly neglected. In particular, I argue that it is importantly different from, and much more plausible than, the kind of instrumentalist approach famously articulated by Bernard Williams. This matters for the interpretation of the arguments for Mackie’s most famous thesis: moral scepticism, the claim that there are no objective values. Richard Joyce has recently defended a version or variant of moral scepticism by invoking an instrumentalist theory like (...)
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  26. David D. Phillips (2007). Trauma Ek Pronoias in Athenian Law. Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:74-.
    This article presents a comprehensive study of the offence of trauma ek pronoias (intentional wounding) in Athenian law. Part I catalogues every occurrence of the words traËma and titr¿skv in the Attic orators and concludes that the requisite physical element of trauma ek pronoias was the use of a weapon. Part II analyses all attested trauma lawsuits and concludes that the requisite mental element of the offence was a bare intent to wound. Part III addresses the procedural evidence for trauma (...)
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  27. David Phillips & Klaus Wiegerling (2007). Introduction to IRIE Vol. 8‖. International Review of Information Ethics 8:5-6.
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  28. Dawn M. Phillips (2007). Complete Analysis and Clarificatory Analysis in Wittgenstein's Tractatus. In Michael Beaney (ed.), The Analytic Turn: Analysis in Early Analytic Philosophy and Phenomenology. Routledge. 164.
    I examine the relationship between complete analysis and clarificatory analysis and explain why Wittgenstein thought he required both in his account of how to solve the problems of philosophy. I first describe Wittgenstein’s view of how philosophical confusions arise, by explaining how it is possible to misunderstand the logic of everyday language. I argue that any method of logical analysis in the Tractatus will inevitably be circular, but explain why this does not threaten the prospect of solving philosophical problems. I (...)
     
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  29. Dawn M. Phillips (2007). The Real Challenge for an Aesthetics of Photography. In Aaron Ridley & Alex Neill (eds.), Arguing about Art (3rd ed.). Routledge.
    An extract from this unpublished article is published in Neill & Ridley (eds.) Arguing about Art (2007).
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  30. Dougal Phillips (2007). The Self-Torment of the White House Screen: Language, Lyotard and Looking Back at the War on Terror. Colloquy 13:5-19.
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  31. D. Z. Phillips (2006). Religion and Friendly Fire. Ars Disputandi 6:1566-5399.
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  32. Dawn M. Phillips (2006). Clear as Mud. Journal of Philosophical Research 31:277-294.
    In both the Tractatus and the Investigations, Wittgenstein claimed that the aim of philosophy is to achieve clarity: to see clearly the logic or grammar of our language. However, his view of clarity underwent an important change, one of many changes that led Wittgenstein to write, in the preface to the Investigations, that his new ideas “could be seen in the right light only by contrast with and against the background of my old way of thinking.” I argue that certain (...)
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  33. Josh Corngold, Rebecca M. Katz, Anne Newman & D. C. Phillips (2005). The State of the Art. Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (1):123–139.
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  34. D. C. Phillips (2005). Stone/Marshall Wedding Address. Educational Philosophy and Theory 37 (3):301–302.
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  35. D. C. Phillips (2005). The Contested Nature of Empirical Educational Research (and Why Philosophy of Education Offers Little Help). Journal of Philosophy of Education 39 (4):577–597.
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  36. D. Z. Phillips (2005). Index for 2005. Philosophical Investigations 28 (4):399-402.
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  37. D. Z. Phillips (2005). The Holocaust and Language. In John K. Roth (ed.), Genocide and Human Rights: A Philosophical Guide. Palgrave Macmillan. 46--64.
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  38. D. Z. Phillips (2005). Wittgensteinianism: Logic, Reality and God. In William J. Wainwright (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Religion. Oxford University Press. 447--71.
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  39. David Phillips (2005). Hume on Practical Reason. Hume Studies 31 (2):299-316.
    I argue for an interpretation of Hume on practical reason different both from the traditional instrumentalist interpretation and the more recent nihilist interpretation. Both involve reading Hume as making normative claims. On the nihilist interpretation, Hume denies that either passions or actions can violate authoritative norms of reason; on the instrumentalist interpretation, Hume denies that passions can violate authoritative norms of reason, but holds that instrumentally irrational actions violate the one such authoritative norm. I argue instead for a purely psychological (...)
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  40. Debby A. Phillips (2005). Reproducing Normative and Marginalized Masculinities: Adolescent Male Popularity and the Outcast. Nursing Inquiry 12 (3):219-230.
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  41. D. C. Phillips (2004). Two Decades After:“After The Wake: Postpositivistic Educational Thought”. Science and Education 13 (1-2):67-84.
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  42. D. Z. Phillips (2004). John Locke (1632–1704). Efrydiau Athronyddol 67 (1):1-15.
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  43. D. Z. Phillips (2004). Philosophical Investigations. Philosophical Investigations 27 (4):397-400.
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  44. D. Z. Phillips (2004). The Problem of Evil and the Problem of God. Scm Press.
     
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  45. D. Z. Phillips (2004). Warranted Christian Belief. International Studies in Philosophy 36 (1):251-252.
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  46. D. Z. Phillips (2004). Wales, Swansea. Philosophical Investigations 27 (1).
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  47. D. Z. Phillips & Mario Von der Ruhr (eds.) (2004). Language and Spirit. Palgrave Macmillan.
    God is said to be Spirit, but the language of spirit is ignored in contemporary philosophy of religion. As well as exploring the notion of spirit in Hegel, Romanticism and Kierkegaard, participants explore the view that God is a spirit without a body, and the relations between "spirit" and "truth.".
     
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  48. D. Z. Phillips (2003). İlham Dilman. Philosophical Investigations 26 (3):iii–iv.
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