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Profile: Duncan Pritchard (University of Edinburgh)
Profile: David James Pritchard
  1. Gwendolyn Cazander, David I. Pritchard, Yamni Nigam, Willi Jung & Peter H. Nibbering (unknown). Prospects & Overviews. Bioessays 35:0000-0000.
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  2. Duncan Pritchard, Contents.
    It is nowadays taken for granted that the core radical sceptical arguments all pivot upon the principle that the epistemic operator in question is ‘closed’ under known entailments. Accordingly, the standard anti-sceptical project now involves either denying closure or retaining closure by amending how one understands other elements of the sceptical argument. However, there are epistemic principles avail- able to the sceptic which are logically weaker than closure but achieve the same result. Accordingly the contemporary debate fails to engage with (...)
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  3. Duncan Pritchard, Contemporary Anti-Scepticism.
    This paper examines the relevance of Wittgenstein’s On Certainty to the contemporary debate regarding the problem of radical scepticism. In particular, it considers two accounts in the recent literature which have seen in Wittgenstein’s remarks on “hinge propositions” in On Certainty the basis for a primarily epistemological anti-sceptical thesis—viz., the inferential contextualism offered by Michael Williams and the ‘unearned warrant’ thesis defended by Crispin Wright. Both positions are shown to be problematic, both as interpretations of Wittgenstein and as anti-sceptical theses. (...)
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  4. Duncan Pritchard, Metaphilosophy.
    AESTRACT: The recent movement towards virtue-theoretic treatments of epistemological concepts can be understood in terms of the desire to eliminate epistemic luck. Significantly, however, it is argued that the two main varieties of virtue epistemology are responding to different types of epistemic luck. In particular, whilst proponents of reliabilism-based virtue theories have been focusing on the problem of what I call "veritic" epistemic luck, non-reliabilism-based virtue theories have instead been concerned with a very different type of epistemic luck, what I (...)
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  5. Duncan Pritchard, Oof.
    6 ABSTRACT. I outline GrecoÕs response to the Pyrrhonian challenge to 7 epistemic externalist theories of knowledge and offer two points of criticism. 8 I also argue, however, that there is an account of epistemic luck available 9 which can cast some light on the dispute that Greco is concerned with, and..
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  6. Duncan Pritchard, Contextualism, Scepticism and Warranted Assertibility Manoeuvres.
    Attributer contextualists maintain that the verb 'knows' is context-sensitive in the sense that the truth conditions of a sentence of the form "S knows that p" can be dependent upon the ascriber's context. One natural objection against attributer contextualism is that it confuses the impropriety of certain assertions which ascribe knowledge to agents with the falsity of those assertions. In an influential article, Keith DeRose has defended attributer contextualism against this charge by proposing constraints on what he calls "warranted assertibility (...)
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  7. Duncan Pritchard, Published in Dialectica 55 (2001), 327-49.
    Perhaps the most dominant anti-sceptical proposal in the recent literatureadvanced by such figures as Stewart Cohen, Keith DeRose and David Lewisis the contextualist response to radical scepticism. Central to the contextualist thesis is the claim that, unlike other non-contextualist anti-sceptical theories, contextualism offers a dissolution of the sceptical paradox that respects our common sense epistemological intuitions. Taking DeRose’s view as representative of the contextualist position, it is argued that instead of offering us an intuitive response to scepticism, contextualism is actually (...)
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  8. Duncan Pritchard, Wittgenstein on Scepticism.
    An overview of Wittgenstein’s remarks on scepticism in On Certainty is offered, especially with regard to the notion of a “hinge proposition”. Several possible interpretations of the anti-sceptical import of this text are then critically assessed, with each view situated within the contemporary literature on scepticism.
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  9. Duncan Pritchard (ed.) (forthcoming). Oxford Bibliographies Online: Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
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  10. Duncan Pritchard (ed.) (forthcoming). What is This Thing Called Philosophy? Routledge.
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  11. Duncan Pritchard & Chris Ranalli (forthcoming). Putnam on Brains-in-Vats and Radical Skepticism. In Sanford Goldberg (ed.), Putnam on Brains in Vats. Cambridge University Press.
  12. Duncan Pritchard & Chris Ranalli (forthcoming). Disjunctivism and Scepticism. In Baron Reed & Diego E. Machuca (eds.), Skepticism: From Antiquity to the Present. Bloomsbury.
    An overview of the import of disjunctivism to the problem of radical scepticism is offered. In particular, the disjunctivist account of perceptual experience is set out, along with the manner in which it intersects with related positions such as naïve realism and intentionalism, and it is shown how this account can be used to a motivate an anti-sceptical proposal. In addition, a variety of disjunctivism known as epistemological disjunctivism is described, and it is explained how this proposal offers a further (...)
     
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  13. J. Adam Carter, Jesper Kallestrup, S. Orestis Palermos & Duncan Pritchard (2014). Varieties of Externalism. Philosophical Issues 24 (1):63-109.
    Our aim is to provide a topography of the relevant philosophical terrain with regard to the possible ways in which knowledge can be conceived of as extended. We begin by charting the different types of internalist and externalist proposals within epistemology, and we critically examine the different formulations of the epistemic internalism/externalism debate they lead to. Next, we turn to the internalism/externalism distinction within philosophy of mind and cognitive science. In light of the above dividing lines, we then examine first (...)
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  14. J. Adam Carter & Duncan Pritchard (2014). Knowledge‐How and Cognitive Achievement. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 88 (1).
    According to reductive intellectualism, knowledge-how just is a kind of propositional knowledge (e.g., Stanley & Williamson 2001; Stanley 2011a, 2011b; Brogaard, 2008a, 2008b, 2009, 2011, 2009, 2011). This proposal has proved controversial because knowledge-how and propositional knowledge do not seem to share the same epistemic properties, particularly with regard to epistemic luck. Here we aim to move the argument forward by offering a positive account of knowledge-how. In particular, we propose a new kind of anti-intellectualism. Unlike neo-Rylean anti-intellectualist views, according (...)
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  15. Jesper Kallestrup & Duncan Pritchard (2014). Virtue Epistemology and Epistemic Twin Earth. European Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):335-357.
    A popular form of virtue epistemology—defended by such figures as Ernest Sosa, Linda Zagzebski and John Greco—holds that knowledge can be exclusively understood in virtue-theoretic terms. In particular, it holds that there isn't any need for an additional epistemic condition to deal with the problem posed by knowledge-undermining epistemic luck. It is argued that the sustainability of such a proposal is called into question by the possibility of epistemic twin earth cases. In particular, it is argued that such cases demonstrate (...)
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  16. Duncan Pritchard (2014). The Modal Account of Luck. Metaphilosophy 45 (4-5):594-619.
    This essay offers a rearticulation and defence of the modal account of luck that the author developed in earlier work (e.g., Pritchard 2005). In particular, the proposal is situated within a certain methodology, a component of which is paying due attention to the cognitive science literature on luck (and risk) ascriptions. It is shown that with the modal account of luck properly articulated it can adequately deal with some of the problems that have recently been offered against it, and that (...)
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  17. Duncan Pritchard & Lee John Whittington (2014). Introductory Note. Metaphilosophy 45 (4-5):475-476.
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  18. Cameron Boult & Duncan Pritchard (2013). Wittgensteinian Anti-Scepticism and Epistemic Vertigo. Philosophia 41 (1):27-35.
    We offer an overview of what we take to be the main themes in Annalisa Coliva’s book, Moore and Wittgenstein: Scepticism, Certainty and Common Sense. In particular, we focus on the ‘framework reading’ that she offers of Wittgenstein’s On Certainty and its anti-sceptical implications. While broadly agreeing with the proposal that Coliva puts forward on this score, we do suggest one important supplementation to the view—viz., that this way of dealing with radical scepticism needs to be augmented with an account (...)
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  19. J. Adam Carter & Duncan Pritchard (2013). Knowledge‐How and Epistemic Luck. Noûs 47 (4).
    Reductive intellectualists (e.g., Stanley & Williamson ; Stanley ; ; Brogaard ; ; ) hold that knowledge-how is a kind of knowledge-that. For this thesis to hold water, it is obviously important that knowledge-how and knowledge-that have the same epistemic properties. In particular, knowledge-how ought to be compatible with epistemic luck to the same extent as knowledge-that. It is argued, contra reductive intellectualism, that knowledge-how is compatible with a species of epistemic luck which is not compatible with knowledge-that, and thus (...)
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  20. Gwendolyn Cazander, David I. Pritchard, Yamni Nigam, Willi Jung & Peter H. Nibbering (2013). Multiple Actions of Lucilia Sericata Larvae in Hard‐to‐Heal Wounds. Bioessays 35 (12):1083-1092.
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  21. Matthew Chrisman, Duncan Pritchard, Jane Suilin Lavelle, Michela Massimi, Alasdair Richmond & Dave Ward (2013). Philosophy for Everyone. Routledge.
    Philosophy for Everyone begins by explaining what philosophy is before exploring the questions and issues at the foundation of this important subject. Key topics and their areas of focus include: Epistemology - what our knowledge of the world and ourselves consists in, and how we come to have it; Philosophy of Science - foundational conceptual issues in scientific research and practice; Philosophy of Mind - what it means for something to have a mind, and how minds should be understood and (...)
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  22. Jesper Kallestrup & D. H. Pritchard (2013). The Power, and Limitations, of Virtue Epistemology. In Ruth Groff & John Greco (eds.), Powers and Capacities in Philosophy: The New Aristotelianism. Routledge. 248--269.
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  23. Spyrion Orestis Palermos & Duncan Pritchard (2013). Extended Knowledge and Social Epistemology. Social Epistemology Review and Reply Collective (8):105-120.
    The place of social epistemology within contemporary philosophy, as well as its relation to other academic disciplines, is the topic of an ongoing debate. One camp within that debate holds that social epistemology should be pursued strictly from within the perspective of individualistic analytic epistemology. In contrast, a second camp holds that social epistemology is an interdisciplinary field that should be given priority over traditional analytic epistemology, with the specific aim of radically transforming the latter to fit the results and (...)
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  24. Duncan Pritchard (2013). Epistemic Virtue and the Epistemology of Education. Journal of Philosophy of Education 47 (2):236-247.
    A certain conception of the relevance of virtue epistemology to the philosophy of education is set out. On this conception, while the epistemic goal of education might initially be promoting the pupil's cognitive success, it should ultimately move on to the development of the pupil's cognitive agency. A continuum of cognitive agency is described, on which it is ultimately cognitive achievement, and thus understanding, which is the epistemic goal of education. This is contrasted with a view on which knowledge is (...)
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  25. Duncan Pritchard & Chris Ranalli (2013). Rorty, Williams, and Davidson: Skepticism and Metaepistemology. Humanities 2 (3):351-368.
    We revisit an important exchange on the problem of radical skepticism between Richard Rorty and Michael Williams. In his contribution to this exchange, Rorty defended the kind of transcendental approach to radical skepticism that is offered by Donald Davidson, in contrast to Williams’s Wittgenstein-inspired view. It is argued that the key to evaluating this debate is to understand the particular conception of the radical skeptical problem that is offered in influential work by Barry Stroud, a conception of the skeptical problem (...)
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  26. Andy Clark, Duncan Pritchard & Krist Vaesen (2012). Extended Cognition and Epistemology. Philosophical Explorations 15 (2):87 - 90.
    Philosophical Explorations, Volume 15, Issue 2, Page 87-90, June 2012.
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  27. Jesper Kallestrup & Duncan Pritchard (2012). Robust Virtue Epistemology and Epistemic Anti-Individualism. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 93 (1):84-103.
    According to robust virtue epistemology, knowledge is a cognitive achievement, where this means that the agent's cognitive success is because of her cognitive ability. One type of objection to robust virtue epistemology that has been put forward in the contemporary literature is that this view has problems dealing with certain kinds of testimonial knowledge, and thus that it is in tension with standard views in the epistemology of testimony. We build on this critique to argue that insofar as agents epistemically (...)
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  28. Eric T. Kerr & Duncan Pritchard (2012). Skepticism and Information. In Hilmi Demir (ed.), Philosophy of Engineering and Technology Volume 8. Springer.
    Philosophers of information, according to Luciano Floridi (The philosophy of information. Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2010, p 32), study how information should be “adequately created, processed, managed, and used.” A small number of epistemologists have employed the concept of information as a cornerstone of their theoretical framework. How this concept can be used to make sense of seemingly intractable epistemological problems, however, has not been widely explored. This paper examines Fred Dretske’s information-based epistemology, in particular his response to radical epistemological (...)
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  29. D. Pritchard (2012). In Defence of Modest Anti-Luck Epistemology. In Kelly Becker & Tim Black (eds.), The Sensitivity Principle in Epistemology. Cambridge University Press. 173--192.
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  30. Duncan Pritchard (2012). Anti-Luck Virtue Epistemology. Journal of Philosophy 109 (3):247-279.
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  31. Duncan Pritchard (2012). Epistemological Disjunctivism. Oxford University Press.
    Epistemological disjunctivism in outline -- Favouring versus discriminating epistemic support -- Radical scepticsim.
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  32. Duncan Pritchard (2012). On Meta-Epistemology. The Harvard Review of Philosophy 18 (1):91-108.
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  33. Duncan Pritchard (2012). Wittgenstein and the Groundlessness of Our Believing. Synthese 189 (2):255-272.
    In his final notebooks, published as On Certainty , Wittgenstein offers a distinctive conception of the nature of reasons. Central to this conception is the idea that at the heart of our rational practices are essentially arational commitments. This proposal marks a powerful challenge to the standard picture of the structure of reasons. In particular, it has been thought that this account might offer us a resolution of the traditional scepticism/anti-scepticism debate. It is argued, however, that some standard ways of (...)
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  34. Sven Bernecker & Duncan Pritchard (eds.) (2011). The Routledge Companion to Epistemology. Routledge.
    Designed to fit the most comprehensive syllabus in the discipline, this text will be an indispensible resource for anyone interested in this central area of ...
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  35. Mikkel Gerken, Jesper Kallestrup, Klemens Kappel & Duncan Pritchard (2011). Introduction: Social Cognitive Ecology and Its Role in Social Epistemology. Episteme 8 (1):1-5.
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  36. Diego Machuca & Duncan Pritchard (2011). Editorial Note. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 1 (2):77-77.
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  37. Diego Machuca & Duncan Pritchard (2011). Editors' Note. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 1 (1):1-2.
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  38. R. McKenna & D. Pritchard (2011). The Case for Contextualism: Knowledge, Skepticism, and Context. Philosophical Review 120 (3):455-460.
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  39. D. H. Pritchard (2011). Wittgensteinian Quasi-Fideism. Oxford Studies in Philosophy of Religion 4:145-159.
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  40. Duncan Pritchard (2011). Epistemological Disjunctivism and the Basis Problem. Philosophical Issues 21 (1):434-455.
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  41. Duncan Pritchard (2011). Evidentialism, Internalism, Disjunctivism. In Trent Dougherty (ed.), Evidentialism and its Discontents. Oxford University Press.
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  42. Duncan Pritchard (2011). Epistemology. Wittgenstein on Scepticism. In Oskari Kuusela & Marie McGinn (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Wittgenstein. Oup Oxford.
  43. Duncan Pritchard (2011). Knowledge or Just a Lucky Guess? The Philosophers' Magazine 55 (55):66-71.
    Our judgements about luck – and about related things, like risk – are for the most part sensitive to what is happening in close possible worlds rather than probabilities.
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  44. Duncan Pritchard (2011). Mikkel Gerken, Jesper Kallestrup, Klemens Kappel, And. Episteme 8:1-5.
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  45. Duncan Pritchard (2011). What is the Swamping Problem? In Andrew Reisner & Asbjørn Steglich-Petersen (eds.), Reasons for Belief. Cambridge University Press.
     
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  46. Duncan Pritchard & Sven Bernecker (eds.) (2011). The Routledge Companion to Epistemology. Routledge.
    Epistemology, the philosophy of knowledge, is at the core of many of the central debates and issues in philosophy, interrogating the notions of truth, objectivity, trust, belief and perception. The Routledge Companion to Epistemology provides a comprehensive and the up-to-date survey of epistemology, charting its history, providing a thorough account of its key thinkers and movements, and addressing enduring questions and contemporary research in the field. Organized thematically, the Companion is divided into ten sections: Foundational Issues, The Analysis of Knowledge, (...)
     
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  47. Sven Bernecker & Duncan Pritchard (eds.) (2010). Routledge Companion to Epistemology. New York: Routledge.
    Designed to fit the most comprehensive syllabus in the discipline, this text will be an indispensible resource for anyone interested in this central area of ...
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  48. Adrian Haddock, Alan Millar & Duncan Pritchard (eds.) (2010). Social Epistemology. Oxford University Press, USA.
    The fifteen new essays presented in this volume aim to show the fertility and variety of social epistemology and to set the agenda for future research.
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  49. Duncan Pritchard (2010). Absurdity, Angst, and the Meaning of Life. The Monist 93 (1):3-16.
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  50. Duncan Pritchard (2010). Achievements, Luck and Value. Think 9 (25):19-30.
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