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  1. D. R. Cooley (2009). Environmental Tobacco Smoke as Child Abuse or Endangerment: A Case for Expanded Regulation. Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (3):181-201.
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  2. D. R. Cooley (2007). Non-Heterosexuals in Heterosexual Marriages as a Form of Spousal Abuse. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 21 (2):161-179.
    When non-heterosexual spouses come out of the closet to their husbands or wives, attention is generally focused upon the non-heterosexual member of the relationship. He or she is often lauded for having the strength to openly acknowledge and pursue a central component of his or her personal identity.Although the attention is justified in many cases, left unexplained is how the heterosexual spouse was treated prior to the revelation. I argue that many heterosexual-non-heterosexual pairings involve spousal abuse. The maltreatment stems from (...)
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  3. D. R. Cooley (2006). Crimina Carnis and Morally Obligatory Suicide. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 9 (3):327 - 357.
    The common consensus on suicide seems to be that even if taking one's life is permissible on some basis, it cannot be morally obligatory. In fact, one argument often used against Utilitarianism is that the principle sometimes requires individuals to sacrifice themselves for the benefit of others, as in the case of healthy individuals who can donate all their life saving organs to those in need of transplants.However, a plausible philosophical case can be built for morally obligatory suicide. First, although (...)
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  4. D. R. Cooley (2004). The Moral Paradigm Test. Journal of Business Ethics 50 (3):289-294.
    Teaching business ethics classes can often be difficult because many students memorize enough of the moral theories to pass their tests, but never understand the motivating spirit underlying the theories. The result is that students are able to apply the moral principles to various situations, but produce the wrong results due to their illicit biases and rationalizations.What is needed is a practical test, which will strip away as many biases and rationalizations as possible, while at the same time emotionally (...)
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  5. D. R. Cooley (2004). Transgenic Organisms and Some Legal Ethics. Public Affairs Quarterly 18 (2):91-110.
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  6. D. R. Cooley (2004). Transgenic Organisms and the Failure of a Free Market Argument. Business Ethics 13 (4):354-371.
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  7. D. R. Cooley & Gary Goreham (2004). Are Transgenic Organisms Unnatural? Ethics and the Environment 9 (1):46-55.
    : The introduction of transgenic organisms into agriculture has raised a firestorm of controversy. Many view the technology as a pathway to a much better future society, whereas others condemn it for endangering people and the environment. One defective argument against transgenics is the Unnatural Is Unethical argument (UIU). UIU attempts to prove if transgenic organisms are unnatural and all unnatural things are morally bad, then transgenics are morally bad. However, the argument fails once it is shown that there is (...)
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  8. D. R. Cooley, Gary Goreham & George A. Youngs (2004). Practical Moral Codes in the Transgenic Organism Debate. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 17 (6):517-544.
    In one study funded by the United States Department of Agriculture, people from North Dakota were interviewed to discover which moral principles they use in evaluating the morality of transgenic organisms and their introduction into markets. It was found that although the moral codes the human subjects employed were very similar, their views on transgenics were vastly different. In this paper, the codes that were used by the respondents are developed, compared to that of the academically composed Belmont Report, and (...)
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  9. D. R. Cooley (2003). Strict Joint and Several Liability and Justice. Journal of Business Ethics 47 (3):199 - 208.
    The American tort system regularly conducts a sort of lottery in which plaintiffs try to name as many defendants in a tort action as they can in order to collect a large judgment from at least one of them. This procedure is encouraged under strict joint and several liability, which permits plaintiffs to recover greater damages from defendants - usually businesses - with less moral culpability for the tort than poorer defendants, who bear greater culpability. In a case involving the (...)
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  10. D. R. Cooley (2002). False Friends. Journal of Business Ethics 36 (3):195 - 206.
    Due to the competitive nature of business as a whole, it is sometimes difficult to develop moral relationships with others. However, though friendships are possible in business, most relationships must be kept on the lower level of business acquaintanceship.
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  11. D. R. Cooley (2002). So Who's Afraid of Frankenstein Food? Journal of Social Philosophy 33 (3):442–463.
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  12. D. R. Cooley (2002). The Cioms's Distributive Justice Principle: A Reply to Dr Benatar. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (1):11-18.
  13. D. R. Cooley (2001). Distributive Justice and Clinical Trials in the Third World. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (3):151-167.
    One of the arguments against conducting human subject trials inthe Third World adopts a distributive justice principle found ina commentary of the CIOM'S Eighth Guideline for internationalresearch on human subjects. Critics argue that non-participantmembers of the community in which the trials are conducted areexploited because sponsoring agencies do not ensure that theproducts developed have been made reasonably available to theseindividuals.I argue that the distributive principle's wording is too vagueand ambiguous to be used to criticize any trial. Furthermore,the mere fact that (...)
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