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Daniel Smilek [19]D. Smilek [7]Dan Smilek [3]
  1. David R. Thomson, Paul Seli, Derek Besner & Daniel Smilek (2014). On the Link Between Mind Wandering and Task Performance Over Time. Consciousness and Cognition 27:14-26.
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  2. James Allan Cheyne, Jonathan S. A. Carriere & Dan Smilek (2013). Age Differences in Attention Lapses Mask Age Differences in Memory Failures: A Methodological Note on Suppression. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    Although objective measures of memory performance typically indicate memory declines with age, self-reported memory failures often show no relation to age. In contrast, self-reported attention failures are reliably negatively correlated with age. This contrast suggests the possibility that age-related awareness and reporting of memory failures might be masked by a concurrent decrease in attention failures, which would reduce encoding failures with age and hence reduce perceived memory failures. Self-reported problems of attention and memory were evaluated in two samples with the (...)
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  3. Tanya R. Jonker, Paul Seli, James Allan Cheyne & Daniel Smilek (2013). Performance Reactivity in a Continuous-Performance Task: Implications for Understanding Post-Error Behavior. Consciousness and Cognition 22 (4):1468-1476.
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  4. Paul Seli, Jonathan S. A. Carriere, Merrick Levene & Dan Smilek (2013). How Few and Far Between? Examining the Effects of Probe Rate on Self-Reported Mind Wandering. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    We examined whether the temporal rate at which thought probes are presented affects the likelihood that people will report periods of mind wandering. To evaluate this possibility, we had participants complete a sustained-attention task (the Metronome Response Task; MRT) during which we intermittently presented thought probes. Critically, we varied the average time between probes (i.e., probe rate) across participants, allowing us to examine the relation between probe rate and mind-wandering rate. We observed a positive relation between these variables, indicating that (...)
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  5. Trish L. Varao Sousa, Jonathan S. A. Carriere & Dan Smilek (2013). The Way We Encounter Reading Material Influences How Frequently We Mind Wander. Frontiers in Psychology 4.
    We examined whether different encounters of reading material influence the likelihood of mind wandering, memory for the material, and the ratings of interest in the material. In a within-subjects design participants experienced three different reading encounters: 1) reading a passage aloud, 2) listening to a passage being read to them, and 3) reading a passage silently. Throughout each reading encounter probes were given in order to identify mind wandering. After finishing the passage participants also rated how interesting it was and (...)
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  6. Leanne Quigley, Andrea L. Nelson, Jonathan Carriere, Daniel Smilek & Christine Purdon (2012). The Effects of Trait and State Anxiety on Attention to Emotional Images: An Eye-Tracking Study. Cognition and Emotion 26 (8):1390-1411.
  7. Paul Seli, James Allan Cheyne & Daniel Smilek (2012). Attention Failures Versus Misplaced Diligence: Separating Attention Lapses From Speed–Accuracy Trade-Offs. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):277-291.
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  8. Grayden Jf Solman, J. Allan Cheyne & Daniel Smilek (2012). Found and Missed: Failing to Recognize a Search Target Despite Moving It. Cognition 123 (1):100-118.
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  9. Kevin Barton, Jonathan Fugelsang & Daniel Smilek (2011). Inhibiting Beliefs Demands Attention. Thinking and Reasoning 15 (3):250-267.
    Research across a variety of domains has found that people fail to evaluate statistical information in an atheoretical manner. Rather, people tend to evaluate statistical information in light of their pre-existing beliefs and experiences. The locus of these biases continues to be hotly debated. In two experiments we evaluate the degree to which reasoning when relevant beliefs are readily accessible (i.e., when reasoning with Belief-Laden content) versus when relevant beliefs are not available (i.e., when reasoning with Non-Belief-Laden content) differentially demands (...)
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  10. James Allan Cheyne, Jonathan S. A. Carriere, Grayden J. F. Solman & Daniel Smilek (2011). Challenge and Error: Critical Events and Attention-Related Errors. Cognition 121 (3):437-446.
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  11. Daniel Smilek, Alicia Callejas, Mike J. Dixon & Philip M. Merikle (2010). Corrigendum to “Ovals of Time: Time–Space Associations in Synaesthesia” [Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2008) 507–519]. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):504-.
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  12. J. Allan Cheyne, Grayden J. F. Solman, Jonathan S. A. Carriere & Daniel Smilek (2009). Anatomy of an Error: A Bidirectional State Model of Task Engagement/Disengagement and Attention-Related Errors. Cognition 111 (1):98-113.
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  13. Kevin Barton, Jonathan Fugelsang & Daniel Smilek (2009). Inhibiting Beliefs Demands Attention. Thinking and Reasoning 15 (3):250 – 267.
    Research across a variety of domains has found that people fail to evaluate statistical information in an atheoretical manner. Rather, people tend to evaluate statistical information in light of their pre-existing beliefs and experiences. The locus of these biases continues to be hotly debated. In two experiments we evaluate the degree to which reasoning when relevant beliefs are readily accessible (i.e., when reasoning with Belief-Laden content) versus when relevant beliefs are not available (i.e., when reasoning with Non-Belief-Laden content) differentially demands (...)
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  14. James Allan Cheyne, Jonathan S. A. Carriere & Daniel Smilek (2009). Absent Minds and Absent Agents: Attention-Lapse Induced Alienation of Agency. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):481-493.
  15. J. Carriere, J. Cheyne & D. Smilek (2008). Everyday Attention Lapses and Memory Failures: The Affective Consequences of Mindlessness. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):835-847.
  16. D. Smilek, J. Eastwood, M. Reynolds & A. Kingstone (2008). Metacognition and Change Detection: Do Lab and Life Really Converge? Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):1056-1061.
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  17. Daniel Smilek & Mike J. Dixon (2008). Two Complementary Perspectives on Synaesthesia. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (10):364-366.
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  18. D. Smilek, A. CAllejas, M. Dixon & P. Merikle (2007). Ovals of Time: Time-Space Associations in Synaesthesia. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (2):507-519.
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  19. Daniel Smilek, John D. Eastwood, Michael G. Reynolds & Alan Kingstone (2007). Metacognitive Errors in Change Detection: Missing the Gap Between Lab and Life. Consciousness and Cognition 16 (1):52-57.
  20. James A. Cheyne, Jonathan S. A. Carriere & Daniel Smilek (2006). Absent-Mindedness: Lapses of Conscious Awareness and Everyday Cognitive Failures. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):578-592.
  21. D. Smilek, A. Callejas, P. Merikle & M. Dixon (2006). Ovals of Time: Space±Time Synesthesia. Consciousness and Cognition 16:507-519.
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  22. John D. Eastwood & Daniel Smilek (2005). Functional Consequences of Perceiving Facial Expressions of Emotion Without Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):565-584.
  23. Philip M. Merikle & Daniel Smilek (2001). Perception Without Awareness: Perspectives From Cognitive Psychology. Cognition 79 (1):115-34.
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  24. M. Dixon, Daniel Smilek, C. Cudahy & Philip M. Merikle (2000). Five Plus Two Equals Yellow: Mental Arithmetic in People with Synaesthesia is Not Coloured by Visual Experience. Nature 406.
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  25. J. D. Eastwood, D. Smilek & P. M. Merikle (2000). Attentional Guidance Based on a Preattentive Analysis of Emotional Expression. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S53 - S53.
     
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  26. D. Smilek, M. J. Dixon, C. Cudahy & P. M. Merikle (2000). Digit-Colour Synaesthesia: An Investigation of Extraordinary Conscious Experiences. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (2):S39 - S39.
     
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  27. Daniel Smilek, Jonathan Eastwood & Philip M. Merikle (2000). Does Unattended Information Facilitate Change Detection? Journal of Experimental Psychology 26:480-487.