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  1.  6
    D. W. Hamlyn & Martha Craven Nussbaum (1980). Aristotle's De Motu Animalium. Philosophical Quarterly 30 (120):246.
  2.  18
    D. W. Hamlyn (1971). The Theory of Knowledge. London,Macmillan.
  3.  4
    T. E. Wilkerson & D. W. Hamlyn (1980). Experience and the Growth of Understanding. Philosophical Quarterly 30 (118):92.
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  4.  94
    D. W. Hamlyn (1955). Quantification, Variables and Pronouns. Analysis 16 (2):33 - 36.
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  5. A. M. Quinton, P. H. Nowell-Smith, William Kneale, Stephen Toulmin, T. R. Miles, P. F. Strawson, D. W. Hamlyn, J. Harrison, Richard Robinson, A. C. Crombie, R. Peters, E. C. Mossner, A. M. Honoré & W. J. Rees (1954). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 63 (252):546-576.
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  6.  18
    D. W. Hamlyn (1980). Schopenhauer. Routledge.
    This book is available either individually, or as part of the specially-priced Arguments of the Philosphers Collection.
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  7.  43
    D. W. Hamlyn (1983). Perception, Learning, and the Self: Essays in the Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge & K. Paul.
    INTRODUCTION If there is one underlying implication in the following essays it is the inadequacy of the information-processing model for cognitive ...
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  8.  10
    D. W. Hamlyn (1977). The Concept of Information in Gibson' S Theory of Perception. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 7 (1):5–16.
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  9.  12
    D. W. Hamlyn (1996). The Concept of a University. Philosophy 71 (276):205 - 218.
    To those who think that an institution must be a function of its history it must seem a considerable anomaly that when universities were first set up in the Middle Ages their main aim, apart from being communities of scholars, was to produce theologians, lawyers and doctors of medicine. For arts and what then had some connection with what we now know as science, as incorporated in the traditional seven liberal arts of grammar, logic and rhetoric, followed by arithmetic, geometry, (...)
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  10. D. W. Hamlyn (1951). Psychological Explanation and the Gestalt Hypothesis. Mind 60 (240):506-520.
  11.  64
    D. W. Hamlyn (1954). A Note on Experience. Analysis 14 (4):90 - 94.
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  12. D. W. Hamlyn (1962). The Correspondence Theory of Truth. Philosophical Quarterly 12 (48):193-205.
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  13.  45
    D. W. Hamlyn (1978). Perception and Agency. The Monist 61 (4):536-547.
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  14.  1
    D. W. Hamlyn, Clarence Irving Lewis, John D. Goheen & John L. Mothershead (1972). Collected Papers of Clarence Irving Lewis. Philosophical Quarterly 22 (86):68.
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  15. D. W. Hamlyn (1967). A Priori and a Posteriori. In Paul Edwards (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Philosophy. New York, Macmillan 1--105.
     
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  16.  17
    D. W. Hamlyn (1965). Aristotle's Treatment of Time. The Classical Review 15 (03):287-.
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  17.  10
    D. W. Hamlyn (1971). Unconscious Intentions. Philosophy 46 (175):12 - 22.
    Is it possible to do something intentionally and yet be unconscious of so doing? Many philosophers would answer ‘No’ to this question on the grounds that it is of the essence of intention that if we do something intentionally we do it knowing what we are doing.
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  18. D. W. Hamlyn (1989). The Pelican History of Western Philosophy. Penguin.
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  19.  42
    D. W. Hamlyn (1978). The Phenomena of Love and Hate. Philosophy 53 (203):5 - 20.
    There has been a good deal of interest in recent years in what Franz Brentano had to say about the notion of ‘intentional objects’ and about intentionality as a criterion of the mental. There has been less interest in his classification of mental phenomena. In his Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint Brentano asserts and argues for the thesis that mental phenomena can be classified in terms of three kinds of mental act or activity, all of which are directed towards an (...)
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  20.  5
    D. W. Hamlyn (1987). A History of Western Philosophy. Viking.
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  21.  57
    D. W. Hamlyn (1956). Analytic Truths. Mind 65 (259):359-367.
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  22.  31
    D. W. Hamlyn (1968). Koine Aisthesis. The Monist 52 (2):195-209.
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  23.  10
    D. W. Hamlyn (1964). Aquinas on the Phϒsics. The Classical Review 14 (03):267-.
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  24.  16
    D. W. Hamlyn (1989). Education and Wittgenstein's Philosophy. Journal of Philosophy of Education 23 (2):213–222.
  25.  4
    D. W. Hamlyn (1986). “Higher Criticism” of Behaviorism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):705.
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  26.  49
    D. W. Hamlyn (1961). On Necessary Truth. Mind 70 (280):514-525.
  27.  49
    D. W. Hamlyn (2005). Consciousness and its Objects. Philosophical Investigations 28 (4):380–384.
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  28.  22
    D. W. Hamlyn (1990). Aristotle on Dialectic. Philosophy 65 (254):465 - 476.
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  29.  16
    D. W. Hamlyn (1965). Aristotle's Treatment of Time Paul F. Conen, S.J.: Die Zeittheorie des Aristoteles. (Zetemata, Heft 35.) Pp. Viii + 185. Munich: Beck, 1964. Paper, DM. 26. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 15 (03):287-288.
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  30. D. W. Hamlyn (1993). KENNY, ANTHONY Aristotle on the Perfect Life. [REVIEW] Philosophy 68:250.
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  31.  2
    D. W. Hamlyn & Eric D'Arcy (1965). Human Acts: An Essay in Their Moral Evaluation. Philosophical Quarterly 15 (59):185.
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  32.  16
    D. W. Hamlyn (1966). Aristotle's Syllogistic Kurt Ebbinghaus: Ein formales Modell der Syllogistik des Aristoteles. (Hypomnemata, 9.) Pp. 85. Göttingen: Vandenhoeck & Ruprecht, 1964. Paper, DM. 14. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 16 (01):34-35.
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  33.  14
    D. W. Hamlyn (1963). The Logic of the Stoics. The Classical Review 13 (01):55-.
  34.  13
    D. W. Hamlyn (1965). Aristotle's Treatment of Value Whitney J. Oates: Aristotle and the Problem of Value. Pp. X + 387. Princeton: University Press (London: Oxford University Press), 1963. Cloth, 68s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 15 (01):38-40.
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  35.  32
    D. W. Hamlyn (1961). Aristotle on Predication. Phronesis 6 (1):110-126.
  36.  24
    D. W. Hamlyn (1968). Aristotle and Platonism G. E. L. Owen: The Platonism of Aristotle. (British Academy: Dawes Hicks Lecture in Philosophy, 1965.) Pp. 26. London: Oxford University Press. Paper, 5s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 18 (01):40-41.
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  37.  37
    D. W. Hamlyn (1976). Aristotelian Epagoge. Phronesis 21 (2):167 - 184.
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  38.  11
    D. W. Hamlyn (1963). Aristotle's Theory of Motion Matthias Schramm: Die Bedeutung der Bewegungslehre des Aristoteles für seine beiden Lösungen der zenonischen Paradoxie. (Philosophische Abhandlungen, xix.) Frankfurt-am-Main: Klostermann, 1962. Paper, DM. 29.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 13 (03):287-288.
  39.  7
    D. W. Hamlyn (1970). Noam Chomsky, "Language and Mind". [REVIEW] Metaphilosophy 1:268.
  40.  11
    D. W. Hamlyn (1971). Schopenhauer on the Principle of Sufficient Reason. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 5:145-162.
    ‘The Principle of Sufficient Reason in all its forms is the sole principle and the sole support of all necessity. For necessity has no other true and distinct meaning than that of the infallibility of the consequence when the reason is posited. Accordingly every necessity is conditioned ; absolute, i.e. unconditioned, necessity therefore is a contradicto in adjecto . For to be necessary can never mean anything but to result from a given reason.’ These words are taken from the beginning (...)
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  41.  12
    D. W. Hamlyn (1985). Need Philosophy of Education Be so Dreary? Journal of Philosophy of Education 19 (2):159–165.
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  42.  25
    D. W. Hamlyn (1992). Book Review:Schopenhauer: The Human Character. John E. Atwell. [REVIEW] Ethics 102 (2):410-.
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  43.  9
    D. W. Hamlyn & George Chatalian (1992). Epistemology and Skepticism: An Enquiry Into the Nature of Epistemology. Philosophical Quarterly 42 (169):501.
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  44.  24
    D. W. Hamlyn (1962). Space and Sight: The Perception of Space and Shape in the Congenitally Blind Before and After Operation. By M. Von Senden. (Methuen. 1960. Pp. 348. Price 42s.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 37 (139):80-.
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  45.  1
    D. W. Hamlyn & Charles Taylor (1991). Sources of the Self: The Making of the Modern Identity. British Journal of Educational Studies 39 (1):101.
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  46.  23
    D. W. Hamlyn (1983). Schopenhauer on the Will in Nature. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 8 (1):457-467.
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  47.  3
    D. W. Hamlyn (1981). Cognitive Systems, ‘Folk Psychology’, and Knowledge. Cognition 10 (1-3):115-118.
  48.  23
    D. W. Hamlyn (1962). Galen's Logic Jurgen Mau: Galen, Einführung in die Logik. Kritisch-exegetischer Kommentar mit deutscher Übersetzung. Pp. xii+69+27. Berlin: Akademie-Verlag, 1960. Paper, DM. 12.50. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 12 (03):209-210.
  49.  18
    D. W. Hamlyn (1964). The Clarendon Categories and de Interpretatione J. L. Ackrill: Aristotle, Categories and De Interpretatione: Translated with Notes and Glossary. (Clarendon Aristotle Series.) Pp. Vi + 162. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1963. Cloth, 25s. Net. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 14 (03):264-265.
  50.  11
    D. W. Hamlyn (1955). The Communion of Forms and the Development of Plato's Logic. Philosophical Quarterly 5 (21):289-302.
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