Search results for 'D. W. Harding' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. D. W. Harding (1962). Psychological Processes in the Reading of Fiction. British Journal of Aesthetics 2 (2):133-147.score: 870.0
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  2. D. Bertrand, M. Ummel & T. -W. Harding (2002). Le comité européen pour la prévention de la torture : Comment la médecine et le droit peuvent se mettre au service des droits de l'homme. Médecine Et Droit 2002 (56):8-16.score: 810.0
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  3. Andrew D. Harding & Mark W. Connolly (2012). Remediation. Jona’s Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 14 (2):48-52.score: 810.0
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  4. D. Bertrand, M. Ummel & T. W. Harding (1996). Activities of a Unit of Medical Law and Clinical Ethics. International Journal of Bioethics 7:324-325.score: 810.0
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  5. Andrew D. Harding, Mark W. Connolly & Timothy O. Wilkerson (2011). Nurses' Risk Without Using Smart Pumps. Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 13 (1):17-20.score: 810.0
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  6. A. W. Wolters (1943). The Impulse to Dominate. By D. W. Harding. (London: Allen & Unwin. 1941. Pp. 256. Price 7s. 6d.). Philosophy 18 (71):274-.score: 459.0
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  7. D. O. Thomas (1973). W. D. Hudson. The Is-Ought Question, A Collection of Papers on the Central Problem in Moral Philosophy. Pp. 271. (Macmillan, 1969.) Hard Covers £1·75, Paper £1·00. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 9 (1):107.score: 138.0
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  8. Vincent W. J. van Gerven Oei (2013). Fuck Peer Review. Continent 2 (4):251-253.score: 30.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  9. Felipe W. Martinez, Nancy Fumero & Ben Segal (2013). Grande Sertão: Veredas by João Guimarães Rosa. Continent 3 (1):27-43.score: 30.0
    INTRODUCTION BY NANCY FUMERO What is a translation that stalls comprehension? That, when read, parsed, obfuscates comprehension through any language – English, Portuguese. It is inevitable that readers expect fidelity from translations. That language mirror with a sort of precision that enables the reader to become of another location, condition, to grasp in English in a similar vein as readers of Portuguese might from João Guimarães Rosa’s GRANDE SERTÃO: VEREDAS. There is the expectation that translations enable mobility. That what was (...)
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  10. Brett W. Schultz (2011). Gonzo Strategies of Deceit: An Interview with Joaquin Segura. Continent 1 (2):117-124.score: 30.0
    Joaquin Segura. Untitled (fig. 40) . 2007 continent. 1.2 (2011): 117-124. The interview that follows is a dialogue between artist and gallerist with the intent of unearthing the artist’s working strategies for a general public. Joaquin Segura is at once an anomaly in Mexico’s contemporary art scene at the same time as he is one of the most emblematic representatives of a larger shift toward a post-national identity among its youngest generation of artists. If Mexico looks increasingly like a foreclosed (...)
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  11. Klemens Kappel (2002). Challenges to Audi's Ethical Intuitionism. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (4):391-413.score: 27.0
    Robert Audi's ethical intuitionism (Audi, 1997, 1998) deals effectively with standard epistemological problems facing the intuitionist. This is primarily because the notion of self-evidence employed by Audi commits to very little. Importantly, according to Audi we might understand a self-evident moral proposition and yet not believe it, and we might accept a self-evident proposition because it is self-evident, and yet fail to see that it is self-evident. I argue that these and similar features give rise to certain challenges to Audi's (...)
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  12. Graham Harman (2011). The Road to Objects. Continent 3 (1):171-179.score: 27.0
    continent. 1.3 (2011): 171-179. Since 2007 there has been a great deal of interest in speculative realism, launched in the spring of that year at a well-attended workshop in London. It was always a loose arrangement of people who shared few explicit doctrines and no intellectual heroes except the horror writer H.P. Lovecraft, an improbable patron saint for a school of metaphysics. Lovecraft serves as a sort of mascot for the “speculative” part of speculative realism, since his grotesque semi-Euclidean monsters (...)
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  13. Michael Ridge (forthcoming). Naïve Practical Reasoning and the Second-Person Standpoint: Simple Reasons for Simple People? Journal of Value Inquiry:1-14.score: 27.0
    Much contemporary first-order moral theory revolves around the debate between consequentialists and deontologists. Depressingly, this debate often seems to come down to irresolvable first-order intuition mongering about runaway trolleys, drowning children in shallow ponds, lying to murderers at doors, and the like. Prima facie, common sense morality contains both consequentialist and deontological elements, so it may be no surprise that direct appeal to first-order intuitions tend towards stalemate. One might infer from this that we should simply embrace some sort of (...)
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  14. Eileen A. Joy (2013). Disturbing the Wednesday-Ish Business-as-Usual of the University Studium: A Wayzgoose Manifest. Continent 2 (4):260-268.score: 27.0
    In this issue we include contributions from the individuals presiding at the panel All in a Jurnal's Work: A BABEL Wayzgoose, convened at the second Biennial Meeting of the BABEL Working Group. Sadly, the contributions of Daniel Remein, chief rogue at the Organism for Poetic Research as well as editor at Whiskey & Fox , were not able to appear in this version of the proceedings. From the program : 2ND BIENNUAL MEETING OF THE BABEL WORKING GROUP CONFERENCE “CRUISING IN (...)
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  15. Todd W. Griffith & Michael D. Byrne (1996). Qualia: The Hard Problem. In. In Garrison W. Cottrell (ed.), Proceedings of the Eighteenth Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Lawrence Erlbaum. 76--79.score: 27.0
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  16. Benjamin W. Libet (1996). Solutions to the Hard Problem of Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (1):33-35.score: 24.0
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  17. W. Bollée (1990). Āyāranga 2, 16 and Sūyagada 1, 16. Journal of Indian Philosophy 18 (1):29-52.score: 15.0
    Passing the Gāhā in review we may note that in composition (i.e., frequent patchwork) and vocabulary it could very well be a part of the Āyāranga, as Schubring suggested — an idea as ingenious as it is probably difficult to prove. Also, if Gāhā originally was the title of Āyār 2, 16, it is strange for a dozen tri $$\underset{\raise0.3em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\cdot}$}}{s}$$ $$\underset{\raise0.3em\hbox{$\smash{\scriptscriptstyle\cdot}$}}{t}$$ ubh stanzas to be thus called, for if the end leaves were exchanged, the text would hardly be separated from (...)
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