Search results for 'DNA' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  10
    Doogab Yi (2008). Cancer, Viruses, and Mass Migration: Paul Berg's Venture Into Eukaryotic Biology and the Advent of Recombinant DNA Research and Technology, 1967-1980. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 41 (4):589 - 636.
    The existing literature on the development of recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering tends to focus on Stanley Cohen and Herbert Boyer's recombinant DNA cloning technology (...)and its commercialization starting in the mid-1970s. Historians of science, however, have pointedly noted that experimental procedures for making recombinant DNA molecules were initially developed by Stanford biochemist Paul Berg and his colleagues, Peter Lobban and A. Dale Kaiser in the early 1970s. This paper, recognizing the uneasy disjuncture between scientific authorship and legal invention in the history of recombinant DNA technology, investigates the development of recombinant DNA technology in its full scientific context. I do so by focusing on Stanford biochemist Berg's research on the genetic regulation of higher organisms. As I hope to demonstrate, Berg's new venture reflected a mass migration of biomedical researchers as they shifted from studying prokaryotic organisms like bacteria to studying eukaryotic organisms like mammalian and human cells. It was out of this boundary crossing from prokaryotic to eukaryotic systems through virus model systems that recombinant DNA technology and other significant new research techniques and agendas emerged. Indeed, in their attempt to reconstitute 'life' as a research technology, Stanford biochemists' recombinant DNA research recast genes as a sequence that could be rewritten thorough biochemical operations. The last part of this paper shifts focus from recombinant DNA technology's academic origins to its transformation into a genetic engineering technology by examining the wide range of experimental hybridizations which occurred as techniques and knowledge circulated between Stanford biochemists and the Bay Area's experimentalists. Situating their interchange in a dense research network based at Stanford's biochemistry department, this paper helps to revise the canonized history of genetic engineering's origins that emerged during the patenting of Cohen-Boyer's recombinant DNA cloning procedures. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   12 citations  
  2.  3
    Miguel García-Sancho (2010). A New Insight Into Sanger's Development of Sequencing: From Proteins to DNA, 1943-1977. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 43 (2):265 - 323.
    Fred Sanger, the inventor of the first protein, RNA and DNA sequencing methods, has traditionally been seen as a technical scientist, engaged in laboratory bench work and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  3.  30
    Ayman Shabana (2012). Paternity Between Law and Biology: The Reconstruction of the Islamic Law of Paternity in the Wake of Dna Testing. Zygon 47 (1):214-239.
    Abstract: The discovery of DNA paternity tests has stirred a debate concerning the definition of paternity and whether the grounds for such a definition are legal or (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  4.  36
    David B. Resnik (2001). DNA Patents and Scientific Discovery and Innovation: Assessing Benefits and Risks. Science and Engineering Ethics 7 (1):29-62.
    This paper focuses on the question of whether DNA patents help or hinder scientific discovery and innovation. While DNA patents create a wide variety of possible benefits (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  5.  26
    Marcia J. Weiss (2004). Beware! Uncle Sam has Your DNA: Legal Fallout From its Use and Misuse in the U.s. [REVIEW] Ethics and Information Technology 6 (1):55-63.
    Technology has provided state and federal governments with huge collections of DNA samples and identifying profiles stored in databanks. That information can be used to solve crimes (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  6.  29
    Pierre-Luc Germain, Emanuele Ratti & Federico Boem (2014). Junk or Functional DNA? ENCODE and the Function Controversy. Biology and Philosophy 29 (6):807-831.
    In its last round of publications in September 2012, the Encyclopedia Of DNA Elements (ENCODE) assigned a biochemical function to most of the human genome, which was (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  20
    Amade M'charek (2008). Silent Witness, Articulate Collective: Dna Evidence and the Inference of Visible Traits. Bioethics 22 (9):519-528.
    DNA profiling is a well-established technology for use in the criminal justice system, both in courtrooms and elsewhere. The fact that DNA profiles are based on (...)non-coding DNA and do not reveal details about the physical appearance of an individual has contributed to the acceptability of this type of evidence. Its success in criminal investigation, combined with major innovations in the field of genetics, have contributed to a change of role for this type of evidence. Nowadays DNA evidence is not merely about identification, where trace evidence is compared to a sample taken from a suspect. An ever-growing role is anticipated for DNA profiling as an investigative tool, a technique aimed at generating a suspect where there is none. One of these applications is the inference of visible traits. As this article will show, racial classifications are at the heart of this application. The Netherlands and its legal regulation of 'externally visible traits' will serve as an example. It will be shown that, to make this technology work, a large number of actors has to be enrolled and their articulations invited. This indicates that instead of a 'silent witness', a DNA profile should rather be seen as an 'articulate collective'. Based on two cases, I argue that the normativity of visible traits is context-dependent. Taking into account the practices in which technology is put to use alerts us to novel ethical questions raised by their application. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8.  20
    Alexis De Tiège, Koen Tanghe, Johan Braeckman & Yves Van de Peer (2014). From DNA- to NA-Centrism and the Conditions for Gene-Centrism Revisited. Biology and Philosophy 29 (1):55-69.
    First theWeismann barrierand later on Francis Crickscentral dogmaof molecular biology nourished the gene-centric paradigm of life, i.e., the conception of the (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  6
    Doris Schröder & Garrath Williams (2002). DNA-Banken und Treuhandschaft [DNA Banking and Trusteeship]. Ethik in der Medizin 14 (2):84-95.
    Definition of the problem:The frequency and scope of human genetic banking has increased significantly in recent years and is set to expand still further. Two of (...)the major growth areas in medical research, pharmacogenomics and population genetics, rely on large DNA banks to provide extensive, centralised and standardised genetic information as well as clinical and personal data. This development raises ethical concerns. Arguments and conclusion: Our article focuses on the appropriateness of informed consent as a means to safeguard both research subjectsrights and their good will. It will be argued that information requirements are extensive, with regard to non-therapeutic research, feedback, type of consent and possible breaches of confidentiality as well as possible implications for third parties. Given the demand of these requirements and the danger that research facilitated by these huge DNA banks may not reflect public priorities, it is argued that the research needs be steered by trustees to ensure that the altruistic act of sample donation contributes to the public good. (shrink)
    Translate
      Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  18
    Rogeer Hoedemaekers & Wim Dekkers (2002). The Ontological Status of Human DNA: Is It Not First and Foremost a Biological ``File Self''? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (4-5):377-395.
    This paper investigates which of the variouslegal notions proposed for human DNA is themost appropriate from an ontological viewpointunique legal status, private property, commonproperty, person, or (...) information. The focus is onthe difficulties that private property, commonproperty and person present. By usingHarré''s notion of ``file-self'''' we arguethat, ontologically, the most appropriate legalnotion to be applied is information. This hasconsequences for storage, control and use ofgenetic information as well as identifiablehuman body material. (shrink)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  2
    Áurea Anguera de Sojo, Juan Ares, María Aurora Martínez, Juan Pazos, Santiago Rodríguez & José Gabriel Zato (2014). Serendipity and the Discovery of DNA. Foundations of Science 19 (4):387-401.
    This paper presents the manner in which the DNA, the molecule of life, was discovered. Unlike what many people, even biologists, believe, it was Johannes Friedrich Miescher (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  1
    Marianne Boenink & Simone van der Burg (2010). Informed Decision Making About Predictive DNA Tests: Arguments for More Public Visibility of Personal Deliberations About the Good Life. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 13 (2):127-138.
    Since its advent, predictive DNA testing has been perceived as a technology that may have considerable impact on the quality of peoples life. The decision whether (...)or not to use this technology is up to the individual client. However, to enable well considered decision making both the negative as well as the positive freedom of the individual should be supported. In this paper, we argue that current professional and public discourse on predictive DNA-testing is lacking when it comes to supporting positive freedom, because it is usually framed in terms of risk and risk management. We show how thisrisk discoursesteers thinking on the good life in a particular way. We go on to argue that empirical research into the actual deliberation and decision making processes of individuals and families may be used to enrich the environment of personal deliberation in three ways: (1) it points at a richer set of values that deliberators can take into account, (2) it acknowledges the shared nature of genes, and (3) it shows how one might frame decisions in a non-binary way. We argue that the public sharing and discussing of stories about personal deliberations offers valuable input for others who face similar choices: it fosters their positive freedom to shape their view of the good life in relation to DNA-diagnostics. We conclude by offering some suggestions as to how to realize such public sharing of personal stories. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. John Richards (ed.) (1978). Recombinant Dna: Science, Ethics, and Politics. Academic Press.
  14. Gerald Weissmann (2009). Mortal and Immortal Dna: Science and the Lure of Myth. Bellevue Literary Press.
    Mortal and immortal DNA : Craig Venter and the lure of "lamia" -- Homeopathy : Holmes, hogwarts, and the Prince of Wales -- Citizen Pinel and the madman at Bellevue (...) -- The experimental pathology of stress : Hans Selye to Paris Hilton -- Gore's fever and Dante's Inferno : Chikungunya reaches Ravenna -- Giving things their proper names : Carl Linnaeus and W.H. Auden -- Spinal irritation and fibromyalgia : Lincoln's surgeon general and the three graces -- Tithonus and the fruit fly : new science and old myths -- Swiftboating "America the beautiful" : Katharine Lee Bates and a Boston marriage -- Nothing makes sense in medicine except in the light of biology -- Apply directly to the forehead : Holmes, Zola, and Hennapecia -- Elizabeth Blackwell breaks the bonds -- Chronic lyme disease and medically unexplained syndromes -- Eugenics and the immigrant : Rosalyn Yalow and Rita Levi-Montalcini -- Science in the Middle East : Robert Koch and the cholera war -- How to win a Nobel prize : thinking inside and outside the box -- Homer Smith and the lungfish : the last gasp of intelligent design -- DDT is back : let us spray! -- Academic boycotts and the Royal Society -- Teach evolution, learn science : John William Draper and the "bone bill" -- Diderot and the yeti crab : the encyclopedias of life -- Dengue fever in Rio : Macumba versus Voltaire. (shrink)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15.  9
    Ricard V. Solé (2010). Genome Size, SelfOrganization and DNA's Dark Matter. Complexity 16 (1):20-23.
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  16. Reed Richter, DNA, Masterpieces, and Abortion: Shifting the Grounds of the Debate.
    Writers, philosophers, and theologians have oft made the comparison between being a mature human being and a masterpiece work of art or design. Employing the analogy between (...)
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  2
    Susan M. Rosenberg, Chandan Shee, Ryan L. Frisch & P. J. Hastings (2012). StressInduced Mutation Via DNA Breaks in Escherichia Coli: A Molecular Mechanism with Implications for Evolution and Medicine. Bioessays 34 (10):885-892.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  18.  2
    James P. Reddington, Duncan Sproul & Richard R. Meehan (2014). DNA Methylation Reprogramming in Cancer: Does It Act by ReConfiguring the Binding Landscape of Polycomb Repressive Complexes? Bioessays 36 (2):134-140.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19.  1
    Keith E. Szulwach & Peng Jin (2014). Integrating DNA Methylation Dynamics Into a Framework for Understanding Epigenetic Codes. Bioessays 36 (1):107-117.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20.  3
    Gloria G. Fortes, Camilla F. Speller, Michael Hofreiter & Turi E. King (2013). Phenotypes From Ancient DNA: Approaches, Insights and Prospects. Bioessays 35 (8):690-695.
  21.  2
    Andrei Kuzminov (2013). Inhibition of DNA Synthesis Facilitates Expansion of LowComplexity Repeats. Bioessays 35 (4):306-313.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22.  34
    Paul Z. Goldstein & Rob DeSalle (2011). Integrating DNA Barcode Data and Taxonomic Practice: Determination, Discovery, and Description. Bioessays 33 (2):135-147.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23.  29
    Monika Piotrowska (2009). The Theoretical Costs of DNA Barcoding. Biological Theory 4 (3):235-239.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24.  9
    Kim L. Beckmann (1999). DNA Fingerprinting and the Offertory Prayer: A Sermon. Zygon 34 (3):537-541.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  5
    Benoit Miotto & Yacine Graba (2010). Control of DNA Replication: A New Facet of Hox Proteins? Bioessays 32 (9):800-807.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26.  5
    Dvir Aran & Asaf Hellman (2014). Unmasking Risk Loci: DNA Methylation Illuminates the Biology of Cancer Predisposition. Bioessays 36 (2):184-190.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27.  2
    Thomas G. Hofmann, Carolina Glas & Nadja Bitomsky (2013). HIPK2: A Tumour Suppressor That Controls DNA DamageInduced Cell Fate and Cytokinesis. Bioessays 35 (1):55-64.
  28.  2
    Alexander Vologodskii (2010). DNA Supercoiling Helps to Unlink Sister Duplexes After Replication. Bioessays 32 (1):9-12.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29.  2
    Herman T. Tavani & Maria Bottis (2010). The Consent Process in Medical Research Involving DNA Databanks: Some Ethical Implications and Challenges. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 40 (2):11-21.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30.  1
    Wolfram Henn (1998). Der DNA-ChipSchlüsseltechnologie Für Ethisch Problematische Neue Formen Genetischen Screenings? Ethik in der Medizin 10 (3):128-137.
    Definition of the problem: The development of molecular genetics has provided tools not only for the diagnosis of genetic diseases and disease dispositions in affected individuals, but (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31.  1
    Björn Schumacher (2009). TranscriptionBlocking DNA Damage in Aging: a Mechanism for Hormesis. Bioessays 31 (12):1347-1356.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  8
    Shawneequa L. Callier (2012). Swabbing Students: Should Universities Be Allowed to Facilitate Educational DNA Testing? American Journal of Bioethics 12 (4):32-40.
    Recognizing the profound need for greater patient and provider familiarity with personalized genomic medicine, many university instructors are including personalized genotyping as part of their curricula. During (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  33.  15
    Ryan J. Taft, Michael Pheasant & John S. Mattick (2007). The Relationship Between NonProteinCoding DNA and Eukaryotic Complexity. Bioessays 29 (3):288-299.
    There are two intriguing paradoxes in molecular biology-the inconsistent relationship between organismal complexity and (1) cellular DNA content and (2) the number of protein-coding genes-referred (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  34.  80
    C. Kenneth Waters, Beyond Theoretical Reduction and Layer-Cake Antireduction: How DNA Retooled Genetics and Transformed Biological Practice.
    Watson and Cricks discovery of the structure of DNA led to developments that transformed many biological sciences. But what were the relevant developments and how did (...)they transform biology? Much of the philosophical discussion concerning this question can be organized around two opposing views: theoretical reductionism and layer-cake antireductionism. Theoretical reductionist and their anti-reductionist foes hold two assumptions in common. First, both hold that biological knowledge is structured like a layer cake, with some biological sciences, such as molecular biology cast at lower levels of organization, and others, such as classical genetics, cast at higher levels. Second, both assume that scientific knowledge is structured by theory and that the productivity of scientific research depends on whether the underlying theory identifies the fundamentals upon which the phenomena to be explained and investigated depend. In the first part of this paper, I challenge these assumptions. In the second part, I show how recasting the basic theory of classical genetics made it possible to retool the methodologies of genetics. It was the investigative power of these retooled methodologies, and not the explanatory power of a gene-based theory, that transformed biology. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  35.  9
    P. A. Melas, L. K. Sjoholm, T. Forsner, M. Edhborg, N. Juth, Y. Forsell & C. Lavebratt (2010). Examining the Public Refusal to Consent to DNA Biobanking: Empirical Data From a Swedish Population-Based Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (2):93-98.
    Objectives To investigate empirically the motivations for not consenting to DNA biobanking in a Swedish population-based study and to discuss the implications. Design Structured questionnaires and (...)semistructured interviews. Setting A longitudinal epidemiological project (PART) ongoing since 1998 in Stockholm, Sweden. The DNA-collection wave took place during 20067. Participants 903 individuals completed the questionnaire (participation rate 36%) and 23 were interviewed. All individuals had participated in both non-genetic waves of the project, but refused to contribute saliva samples during the DNA-collection wave. Main outcome measures Motivations behind refusing to consent to DNA biobanking, with subsequent focus on participants' explanations regarding this unwillingness. Results Public refusal to consent to DNA biobanking, as revealed by the questionnaire, was mainly explained by a lack of personal relevance of DNA contribution and feelings of discomfort related to the DNA being used for purposes other than the respective study. Interviews of individuals representing the second motivation, revealed a significant mistrust of DNA biobank studies. The underlying beliefs and attitudes were associated with concerns about integrity, privacy, suspiciousness and insecurity. However, most interviewees were supportive of genetic research per se and interpreted their mistrust in the light of distressing environmental influences. Conclusion The results suggest a need for guidelines on benefit sharing, as well as trustworthy and stable measures to maintain privacy, as a means for increasing personal relevance and trust among potential participants in genetic research. Measures taken from biobanks seem insufficient in maintaining and increasing trust, suggesting that broader societal measures should be taken. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  36.  50
    Samuel Schindler (2008). Model, Theory, and Evidence in the Discovery of the DNA Structure. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 59 (4):619-658.
    In this paper, I discuss the discovery of the DNA structure by Francis Crick and James Watson, which has provoked a large historical literature but has yet (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  37.  5
    U. Deichmann (2004). Early Responses to Avery Et Al.'s Paper on DNA as Hereditary Material. Historical Studies in the Physical and Biological Sciences 34 (2):207-232.
    Averys et al. ’s 1944 paper provides the first direct evidence of DNA having gene-like properties and marks the beginning of a new phase in early (...) molecular genetics (with a strong focus on chemistry and DNA). The study of its reception shows that on the whole, Averys results were immediately appreciated and motivated new research on transformation, the chemical nature of DNAs biological specificity and bacteria genetics. It shows, too, that initial problems of transferring transformation to other systems and prominent criticism of its results nurtured skepticism. Averys experiment was downplayed and neglected particularly by many of those scientists who worked in the new fields of biochemical and biophysical genetics, genetic phage, and TMV research. This was not due to the fact that the implications of the paper could not be connected to generally accepted knowledge. Contrary to a widespread belief, the assumed uniformity of DNA as opposed to proteins was not used as an argument against the validity of Averys et al.’s finding. The indifference rather reflected, among other things, the disciplinary gap between the chemically oriented microbiologists and the old and new geneticists who remained committed to genetic and physical methods (in particular x-ray studies) and clung to the assumption that proteins were the sole carriers of biological specificity. The responses to Averys et al.’s paper show how different research interests in the areas between microbiology, genetics, and biochemistry interacted with the prejudices, dogmas, individual farsightedness or short-sightedness, and scientific authority during a pivotal period of early molecular biology. (shrink)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  38.  3
    James Marcum (2002). From Heresy to Dogma in Accounts of Opposition to Howard Temin's DNA Provirus Hypothesis. History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 24 (2):165 - 192.
    In 1964 the Wisconsin virologist Howard Temin proposed the DNA provirus hypothesis to explain the mechanism by which a cancer-producing virus containing only RNA infects and (...)transforms cells. His hypothesis reversed the flow of genetic information, as ordained by the central dogma of molecular biology. Although there was initial opposition to his hypothesis it was widely accepted, after the discovery of reverse transcriptase in 1970. Most accounts of Temin's hypothesis after the discovery portray the hypothesis as heretical, because it challenged the central dogma. Temin himself in his Nobel Prize speech of 1975 narrates a similar story about its reception. But are these accounts warranted? I argue that members of the virology community opposed Temin's provirus hypothesis not simply because it was a counterexample to the central dogma, but more importantly because his experimental evidence for supporting it was inconclusive. Furthermore, I propose that these accounts of opposition to the DNA provirus hypothesis as heretical, written by Temin and others after the discovery of reverse transcriptase, played a significant role in establishing retrovirology as a specialized field. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  39.  14
    Michael Lynch (2013). Science, Truth, and Forensic Cultures: The Exceptional Legal Status of DNA Evidence. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 44 (1):60-70.
    Many epistemological terms, such as investigation, inquiry, argument, evidence, and fact were established in law well before being associated with science. However, while legal proof remained qualified (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  10
    Robin Williams & Paul Johnson (2005). Inclusiveness, Effectiveness and Intrusiveness: Issues in the Developing Uses of DNA Profiling in Support of Criminal Investigations. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 33 (3):545-558.
    The rapid implementation and continuing expansion of forensic DNA databases around the world has been supported by claims about their effectiveness in criminal investigations and challenged by (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  41.  6
    Naama Hirsch & Ramon Y. Birnbaum (2016). Dual Function of DNA Sequences: Protein-Coding Sequences Function as Transcriptional Enhancers. Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 58 (2):182-195.
    The human genome consists of more than 3 billion base pairs built from four different nucleotides that hold the genetic information for the entire organism. The genome (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42.  5
    James A. Shapiro (2006). Genome Informatics: The Role of DNA in Cellular Computations. Biological Theory 1 (3):288-301.
    Cells are cognitive entities possessing great computational power. DNA serves as a multivalent information storage medium for these computations at various time scales. Information is stored in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  43.  12
    Mansel Davies (1990). W. T. Astbury, Rosie Franklin, and DNA: A Memoir. Annals of Science 47 (6):607-618.
    Astbury's role in the X-ray study of DNA; his failure to continue his pioneering appraisal; surprising details of his MRC grant application; and his disinterest in (...) Beighton's DNA photographs demand attention. Rosie Franklin's later involvement and behaviour receive comments, which, as with Astbury, are based on personal knowledge. (shrink)
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  44.  3
    Dario Giacomoni (1993). The Origin of DNA:RNA Hybridization. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 26 (1):89 - 107.
    Besides its use in basic research, the DNA:RNA hybridization technique has helped the development of genetic engineering: it is instrumental in the isolation of specific genes (...)that can be inserted into foreign cells, thus modifying their genetic information. Plants, animals, and microorganisms can now be altered to yield improved crops, pest-resistant plants, and a cheaper source of important proteins or drugs. The social relevance of genetic engineering received official sanction in 1980 when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that genetically modified organisms can be patented. In this article I have tried to describe the discovery of the DNA:RNA hybridization technique as the successful outcome of years of intelligent and patient research in many laboratories, of inductive and deductive processes in the minds of many biologists. The synthesis that led to the final result and to the early development of the technique was made possible by the coming together of two brilliant scientists, Sol Spiegelman and Benjamin Hall. (shrink)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  45.  11
    Tania Simoncelli (2006). Dangerous Excursions: The Case Against Expanding Forensic DNA Databases to Innocent Persons. Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (2):390-397.
    Recent expansions of federal and state law enforcement databanks to include DNA samples and profiles of innocent persons threaten individual privacy, impose unjustifiable costs on society, and (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  46.  24
    Gheorghe Paun & Mario J. Pérez-Jiménez (2003). Recent Computability Models Inspired From Biology: DNA and Membrane Computing. Theoria 18 (1):71-84.
    We briefly present two areas of natural computing, vividly investigated in the recent years: DNA computing and membrane computing. Both of them have the roots in cellular (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47.  7
    E. Suarez (2001). Satellite-DNa: A Case-Study for the Evolution of Experimental Techniques. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 32 (1):31-57.
    The paper tries to show that an evolutionary perspective helps us to address what is called the adaptation problem, that is, the remarkable coherence, and seemingly successful (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  48.  15
    A. Patyn & K. Dierickx (2010). Forensic DNA Databases: Genetic Testing as a Societal Choice. Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (5):319-320.
    In this brief report, the authors argue that while a lot of concerns about forensic DNA databases have been raised using arguments from biomedical ethics, these databases (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  49.  58
    W. Henn (1999). Genetic Screening with the DNA Chip: a New Pandora's Box? Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (2):200-203.
    The ethically controversial option of genetic population screening used to be restricted to a small number of rather rare diseases by methodological limitations which are now about (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50.  7
    Matthieu Queloz (2016). The Double Nature of DNA: Reevaluating the Common Heritage Idea. Journal of Political Philosophy 24 (1):47-66.
    DNA possesses a double nature: it is both an analog chemical compound and a digital carrier of information. By distinguishing these two aspects, this paper aims to (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 1000