Search results for 'Daesuk Han' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Daesuk Han (2011). Wittgenstein and the Real Numbers. History and Philosophy of Logic 31 (3):219-245.score: 240.0
    When it comes to Wittgenstein's philosophy of mathematics, even sympathetic admirers are cowed into submission by the many criticisms of influential authors in that field. They say something to the effect that Wittgenstein does not know enough about or have enough respect for mathematics, to take him as a serious philosopher of mathematics. They claim to catch Wittgenstein pooh-poohing the modern set-theoretic extensional conception of a real number. This article, however, will show that Wittgenstein's criticism is well grounded. A real (...)
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  2. Daesuk Han (2013). Wittgenstein on Russell's Theory of Logical Types. Journal of Philosophical Research 38:115-146.score: 240.0
    Wittgenstein criticizes Russell’s theory of logical types for involving the idea that our language must be anchored in extra-linguistic entities so that it makes a meaningful combination of signs. Calling it the “fallacy of meaning,” Wittgenstein self-consciously remains within the realm of signs. This issue of meaning vs. sign, however, has not been understood correctly, partly because of being viewed through the distorting lens of Russell. Siding with Wittgenstein, I will argue that our language does not go wrong because of (...)
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  3. Cha-gyŏng Han (2008). Hanʼguk Chʻŏrhak Ŭi Maek. Ihwa Yŏja Taehakkyo Chʻulpʻanbu.score: 180.0
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  4. Sŭng-jo Han (1976). Hanʼguk Minjujuŭi Wa Chŏngchʻi Palchŏn.score: 180.0
     
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  5. Qingxiang Han (2011). Han Qingxiang Lun Wen Xuan. Zhonghua Shu Ju.score: 180.0
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  6. Chong-man Han (2009). Pulgyo Wa Han'guk Sasang. Pulgyo Ch'unch'usa.score: 180.0
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  7. Myŏn-hŭi Han (2009). Tong Asia Ŭi Munmyŏng Kwa Han 'Guk Ŭi Saengt'aejuŭi =. Ch'ŏrhak Kwa Hyŏnsilsa.score: 180.0
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  8. Alejandro Bárcenas (2013). Han Fei's Enlightened Ruler. Asian Philosophy 23 (3):236-259.score: 24.0
    In this essay I revise, based on the notion of the ‘enlightened ruler’ or mingzhu and his critique of the literati of his time, the common belief that Han Fei was an amoralist and an advocate of tyranny. Instead, I will argue that his writings are dedicated to advising those who ought to rule in order to achieve the goal of a peaceful and stable society framed by laws in accordance with the dao.
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  9. Alejandro Bárcenas (2012). Xunzi and Han Fei on Human Nature. International Philosophical Quarterly 52 (2):135-148.score: 24.0
    It is commonly accepted that Han Fei studied under Xunzi sometime during the late third century BCE. However, there is surprisingly little dedicated to the in-depth study of the relationship between Xunzi’s ideas and one of his best-known followers. In this essay I argue that Han Fei’s notion of xing, commonly translated as human nature, was not only influenced by Xunzi but also that it is an important feature of his political philosophy.
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  10. Eric Hutton (2008). Han Feizi's Criticism of Confucianism and its Implications for Virtue Ethics. Journal of Moral Philosophy 5 (3):423-453.score: 24.0
    Several scholars have recently proposed that Confucianism should be regarded as a form of virtue ethics. This view offers new approaches to understanding not only Confucian thinkers, but also their critics within the Chinese tradition. For if Confucianism is a form of virtue ethics, we can then ask to what extent Chinese criticisms of it parallel criticisms launched against contemporary virtue ethics, and what lessons for virtue ethics in general might be gleaned from the challenges to Confucianism in particular. This (...)
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  11. David Elstein (2011). Han Feizi's Thought and Republicanism. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):167-185.score: 24.0
    Feizi’s philosophy is usually represented as an amoral autocracy where the ruler is the sole political power and runs the state by controlling the people through rewards and punishments. While his system is formally autocratic, this article argues that the purpose behind this system bears some similarity to the republican political ideal of non-domination. In this interpretation, Han Feizi makes the ruler the sole power to mitigate the danger of the state being dominated by ministers. He does not employ republican (...)
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  12. Chang-Hee Son (2000). Haan (Han, Han) of Minjung Theology and Han (Han, Han) of Han Philosophy: In the Paradigm of Process Philisophy and Metaphysics of Relatedness. University Press of America.score: 24.0
    For Pyun, Minjung theology is a "religion-neglect" and indigenization theology or han philosophy is "politics-neglect." However, he conceded that ...
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  13. Henrique Schneider (2013). Han Fei, De, Welfare. Asian Philosophy 23 (3):260-274.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the relation of order and welfare for Han Fei's philosophy. It will be claimed that the Legalist did indeed show concern for the overall quality of life of society, claiming that his model state would lead to a substantial increase for the individual's welfare. On the other hand, although he acknowledges (and cares) for these positive consequences, Han Fei does not attach any value for legitimizing the system he proposes to them. Even if there were any value (...)
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  14. Aloysius P. Martinich (2014). Political Theory and Linguistic Criteria in Han Feizi's Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):379-393.score: 24.0
    Han Feizi’s 韓非子 thought, I argue, contains a political theory that justifies principled, law-governed government. A key element of his theory is a solution to the problem of rectifying names. He recognized that the same word can have varying criteria of application depending on the purpose of the practice that requires a criterion. Some criteria for a practice are good and some bad. A wise ruler knows which criteria are good and appropriate to ruling. His view is illuminated by considering (...)
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  15. Roger Boesche (2005). Han Feizi's Legalism Versus Kautilya's Arthashastra. Asian Philosophy 15 (2):157 – 172.score: 18.0
    Writing only decades apart, Han Feizi (ca. 250 BCE) and Kautilya (ca. 300 BCE) were two great political thinkers who argued for strong leaders, king or emperor, to unify warring states and bring peace, who tried to show how a ruler controls his ministers as well as the populace, defended the need for spies and violence, and developed the key ideas needed to support the bureaucracies of the emerging and unified states of China and India respectively. Whereas both thinkers disliked (...)
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  16. Paul R. Goldin (2001). Han Fei's Doctrine of Self-Interest. Asian Philosophy 11 (3):151 – 159.score: 18.0
    Chapter 49 of the Han Feizi, entitled 'Wudu' ('The Five Vermin'), includes one of the earliest discussions in Chinese history of the concepts of gong and si: Han Fei (d. 233 B.C.) takes si to mean 'acting in one's own interest'. Gong is simply what opposes si. 'Acting in one's own interest' is not inherently reprehensible in Han Fei's view; but a ruler must remember why ministers propose their policies: they are concerned only with enriching themselves, and look upon the (...)
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  17. Wonsuk Chang (2012). Ch'oe Han-Gi's Confucian Philosophy of Experience: New Names for Old Ways of Thinking. Philosophy East and West 62 (2):186-196.score: 18.0
    In this article, it is argued that Ch'oe Han-gi (1803-1877), a Korean Confucian scholar from the late Chosŏn, can be credited with finding the full philosophical significance of the notion of experience (kyŏnghŏm). At the same time, his philosophy of experience can be interpreted adequately in the context of not British empiricist but Confucian philosophical assumptions. There is both continuity and discontinuity in Ch'oe's relation to Confucian tradition. Unlike the Confucian traditionalist, he admitted that inherited knowledge and practice are potentially (...)
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  18. Peter R. Moody (1979). The Legalism of Han Fei-Tzu and Its Affinities with Modern Political Thought. International Philosophical Quarterly 19 (3):317-330.score: 18.0
    The legalism of han fei-Tzu has affinities with much of modern political thought, Particularly in its denial of an objective morality. Because legalism is modernism unmoralized, It shows clearly some of the less savory implications of the truisms we accept. Han fei's ideas are interesting in their own right, But it is also interesting to see these ideas in a comparative setting, That we might gain a broader understanding of modern political thought, Both of its merits and its limitations.
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  19. Shiling Xiang (2010). Inquiry Into the Transcendence of Tang Dynasty Confucians to Han Dynasty Confucians and the Transformation of Traditional Confucianism in Terms of Lunyu Bijie. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):471-485.score: 18.0
    Neo-Confucianism of the Han and Tang dynasties is an indispensable part of the history of Chinese philosophy. From Han dynasty Confucians to Tang dynasty Confucians, the study of Confucian classics evolved progressively from textual research to conceptual explanation. A significant sign of this transformation is the book Lunyu Bijie 论语笔解 (A Written Explanation of the Analects), co-authored by Han Yu and Li Ao. Making use of the tremendous room for interpretation within the Analects, the book studied and reorganized the relationship (...)
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  20. Wiebke Denecke (2010). The Dynamics of Masters Literature: Early Chinese Thought From Confucius to Han Feizi. Distributed by Harvard University Press.score: 18.0
    Introduction: Chinese philosophy and the translation of disciplines -- The faces of masters literature until the Eastern Han -- Scenes of instruction and master bodies in the Analects -- From scenes of instruction to scenes of construction: Mozi -- Interiority, human nature, and exegesis in Mencius -- Authorship, human nature, and persuasion in Xunzi -- The race for precedence: polemics and the vacuum of traditions in Laozi -- Zhuangzi and the art of negation -- The self-regulating state, paranoia, and rhetoric (...)
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  21. Denis Dutton, Han Van Meegeren.score: 18.0
    The most notorious and celebrated forger of the twentieth century, Han van Meegeren (1889-1947), was born in the Dutch town of Deventer. He was fascinated by drawing as a child, and pursued it despite his father’s disapproval, sometimes spending all his pocket money on art supplies. In high school he was able finally to receive professional instruction, and went on to study architecture, according to his father’s wishes. In 1911 he married Anna de Voogt. His artistic talents were recognized when (...)
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  22. Soon-Ja Yang (2012). Song, Hongbing 宋洪兵, New Studies of Han Feizi's Political Thought 韓非子政治思想再硏究. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (263):266.score: 18.0
    Song, Hongbing 宋洪兵, New Studies of han Feizi’s Political Thought 韓非子政治思想再硏究 Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-4 DOI 10.1007/s11712-012-9265-2 Authors Soon-ja Yang, Inha University, 253 Yonghyeon 4-dong, Nam-gu, Incheon, South Korea 402-751 Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009.
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  23. Eirik Lang Harris (2014). Legalism: Introducing a Concept and Analyzing Aspects of Han Fei's Political Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 9 (3):155-164.score: 18.0
    ‘Legalism’ is a term that has long been used to categorize a group of early Chinese philosophers including, but not limited to, Han Fei (Han Feizi), Shen Dao, Shen Buhai, and Shang Yang. However, the usefulness of this term has been contested for nearly as long. This essay has the goal of introducing the idea of ‘Legalism’ and laying out aspects of the political thought of Han Fei, the most prominent of these thinkers. In this essay, I first lay out (...)
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  24. Michael Nylan (1997). Han Classicists Writing in Dialogue About Their Own Tradition. Philosophy East and West 47 (2):133-188.score: 18.0
    Despite the scathing criticisms leveled at Han philosophy by orthodox Neo-Confucians and their latter-day scholastic followers, the most accurate characterization of many extant pieces of Han philosophical writing would be "critical" (rather than "superstitious") and "probing" (rather than "derivative"). In defense of this statement, three major Han philosophical works are examined, with particular emphasis on the treatment in these works of classical tradition and classical learning. The three works are the "Fa yen" (ca. A.D. 9) by Yang Hsiung, the "Lun (...)
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  25. Henrique Schneider (2012). Reading Han Fei as "Social Scientist&Quot;: A Case-Study in "Historical Correspondence&Quot;. Comparative Philosophy 4 (1).score: 18.0
    Han Fei was one of the main proponents of Legalism in Qin -era China. Although his works are mostly read from a historic perspective, the aim of this paper is to advance an interpretation of Han Fei as a “social scientist”. The social sciences are the fields of academic scholarship that study society and its institutions as a consequence of human behavior. Methodologically, social sciences combine abstract approaches in model-building with empiric investigations, seeking to prove the functioning of the models. (...)
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  26. Masayuki Sato (2013). Did Xunzi's Theory of Human Nature Provide the Foundation for the Political Thought of Han Fei? In Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer. 147--165.score: 18.0
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  27. Masayuki Sato (2013). Studies of the Han Feizi in China, Taiwan, and Japan. In Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer. 257--281.score: 18.0
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  28. Soon-ja Yang (2013). Shen Dao's Theory of Fa and His Influence on Han Fei. In Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer. 47--63.score: 18.0
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  29. Paul R. Goldin (2013). Introduction: Han Fei and the Han Feizi. In , Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer. 1--21.score: 18.0
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  30. Sarah A. Queen (2013). Han Feizi and the Old Master: A Comparative Analysis and Translation of Han Feizi Chapter 20,“Jie Lao,” and Chapter 21,“Yu Lao”. [REVIEW] In Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer. 197--256.score: 18.0
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  31. Yuri Pines (2013). Submerged by Absolute Power: The Ruler's Predicament in the Han Feizi. In Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer. 67--86.score: 18.0
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  32. Albert Galvany (2013). Beyond the Rule of Rules: The Foundations of Sovereign Power in the Han Feizi. In Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer. 87--106.score: 18.0
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  33. Xiaoyan Wang & Jinsuo Zhao (2012). The Cultural Exchange Between Sino-Western: Silk Trade in Han Dynasty. Asian Culture and History 4 (1):p13.score: 18.0
    As we all know, the Silk Road, as a famous ancient transportation route, was a trade line cross-Eurasian continent in history. Its name was from the delivery of silk. However, no Chinese ancient documents mentioned the name of “Silk Road”. German F. V. Richthofen (1933-1905) firstly used the term “Silk Road” in his book China, published in 1877. Afterwards, the name of “Silk Road” has been accepted universally and used by the world widely. The Silk Road was an ancient business (...)
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  34. Eirik Lang Harris (2013). Han Fei on the Role of Morality in Political Philosophy. In Paul R. Goldin (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Han Fei. Springer.score: 18.0
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  35. Grace Ji-Sun Kim (2013). Colonialism, Han, and the Transformative Spirit. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 18.0
    1. Empire, Colonialism, and Globalization -- 2. Consumerism and Overconsumption -- 3. Nature and "Han" -- 4. Transformative Power of the Spirit -- Conclusion.
     
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  36. Han-sik Kim (2006). Hanʼguk Ŭi Kŭndaesŏng: Sirhak Sasang Ŭl Chungsim Ŭro. Paeksan Sŏdang.score: 18.0
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  37. Han Liu (2005). Liu Han Wen Ji =. Shanghai Ci Shu Chu Ban She.score: 18.0
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  38. Han Liu (2004). Liu Han Wen Xuan. Fa Lü Chu Ban She.score: 18.0
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  39. Han-gu Yi (2010). Yŏksajuŭi Wa Panyŏksajuŭi: "Yŏksajuŭi Wa Yŏksa Ch'ŏrhak" Ŭl Kich'o Ro Saeropke Chŏn'gae Han Yŏksajuŭi Ŭi Hyŏndaejŏk Chaegusŏng Kwa Kŭ Pip'an. Ch'ŏrhak Kwa Hyŏnsilsa.score: 18.0
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  40. Qingbao Zeng (ed.) (2007). Quan Shi Xue Yu Han Yu Shen Xue = Hermeneutics and Sino-Christian Theology. Dao Feng Shu She.score: 16.0
    Rudolf Bultmann -- Gerhard Ebeling -- Hans-Georg Gadamer -- Paul Ricoeur -- David Tracy.
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  41. Tongdong Bai (2011). Preliminary Remarks: Han Fei Zi—First Modern Political Philosopher? Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):4-13.score: 15.0
  42. Owen Flanagan & H. U. Jing (2011). Han Fei Zi's Philosophical Psychology: Human Nature, Scarcity, and the Neo-Darwinian Consensus. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):293-316.score: 15.0
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  43. Burton Watson (ed.) (1967). Basic Writings of Mo Tzu, Hsün Tzu, and Han Fei Tzu. Columbia Univ Pr.score: 15.0
    Compiling in one volume the basic writings of these three seminal thinkers of ancient China, each from a different philosophical school, this book reveals the richness and diversity of the ancient Chinese intellectual world.
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  44. Ti Ch'ing (1978). A Reading of Han Fei's "Wu Tu" [Five Vermin]. Contemporary Chinese Thought 10 (1):19-33.score: 15.0
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  45. Gary Gutting (2003). Review of Beatrice Han, Foucault's Critical Project. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2003 (5).score: 15.0
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  46. Peter R. Moody (2011). Han Fei in His Context: Legalism on the Eve of the Qin Conquest. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):14-30.score: 15.0
  47. Chung-Ying Cheng (1983). Metaphysics of Tao and Dialectics of Fa: An Evaluation of HTSC in Relations to Lao Tzu and Han Fei and an Analytical Study of Interrelationships of Tao, Fa, Hsing, Ming and Li. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 10 (3):251-284.score: 15.0
  48. Arabella Lyon (2008). Rhetorical Authority in Athenian Democracy and the Chinese Legalism of Han Fei. Philosophy and Rhetoric 41 (1):51-71.score: 15.0
  49. Ellen Marie Chen (1975). The Dialectic of Chih (Reason) and Tao (Nature) in the Han Fei-Tzu. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 3 (1):1-21.score: 15.0
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  50. Andreas Schöter (2009). A Companion to Yijng Numerology and Cosmology: Chinese Studies of Images and Numbers From Han (202 Bce–220 Ce) to Song (960–1279 Ce) – by Bent Nielsen. [REVIEW] Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (3):487-493.score: 15.0
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