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Profile: Dale Tuggy
  1. Dale Tuggy (2013). Constitution Trinitarianism. Philosophy and Theology 25 (1):129-162.
    In recent work, philosophical theologians Michael Rea and Jeffrey Brower have formulated a precise way of understanding the doctrine of the Trinity along the lines of a contemporary constitution theory of material objects. Here I explain the theological and philosophical thinking behind their proposal, and give seven objections to it. Stepping back to consider methodology, I distinguish several goals a Trinity theory may aim at, and argue that the theory at hand achieves some but not others. Most importantly, it fails (...)
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  2. Dale Tuggy (2013). Hasker's Quests for a Viable Social Theory. Faith and Philosophy 30 (2):171-187.
    In a series of papers, William Hasker, in conversation with important recent work in philosophical theology, has carefully articulated and argued for a version of “social” trinitarianism. I argue that this theory should be rejected because it is not consistently monotheistic.
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  3. Dale Tuggy (2012). Which Trinity? Whose Monotheism? Philosophical and Systematic Theologians on the Metaphysics of Trinitarian Theology. Faith and Philosophy 29 (2):232-236.
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  4. Dale Tuggy (2011). On Positive Mysterianism. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 69 (3):205-226.
    Religious believers react in one of four ways to apparent contradictions among their beliefs: Redirection, Resistance, Restraint, or Resolution. This paper evaluates positive mysterian Resistance, the view that believers may rationally believe and know apparently contradictory religious doctrines. After locating this theory by comparing and contrasting it with others, I explore the best developed version of it, that of James Anderson’s Paradox in Christian Theology. I argue that it faces steep epistemic problems, and is at best a temporarily reasonable but (...)
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  5. Dale Tuggy, Trinity. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  6. Dale Tuggy (2009). Maria Rosa Antognazza Leibniz on the Trinity and the Incarnation: Reason and Revelation in the Seventeenth Century . Trans. Gerald Parks. (New Haven Ct & London: Yale University Press, 2007). Pp. XXV+322. £35.00 (Hbk). Isbn 978 0 300 10074. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 45 (2):232-237.
  7. Dale Tuggy (2009). Paradox in Christian Theology. Faith and Philosophy 26 (1):104-108.
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  8. Dale Tuggy (2007). Three Roads to Open Theism. Faith and Philosophy 24 (1):28-51.
    Open theists agree that God lacks what is normally called “comprehensive” foreknowledge, but why believe this? Open theists answer in three ways, which I call the narrow road, the wide road, and the shortcut to open theism. Here I argue that (1) the narrow road faces a difficulty concerning the doctrine of divine omniscience which doesn’t arise for the wide road, (2) the wide road is well-motivated and appealing, given certain philosophical commitments, (3) the shortcut is too simple to work, (...)
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  9. Dale Tuggy (2005). Michael D. Robinson the Storms of Providence: Navigating the Waters of Calvinism, Arminianism, and Open Theism. (New York: University Press of America, 2003). Pp. X+302. £33.00 (Pbk). ISBN 0 7618 2737. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 41 (2):237-242.
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  10. Dale Tuggy (2005). Necessity, Control, and the Divine Command Theory. Sophia 44 (1):53-75.
    The simplest Divine Command Theory is one which identifies rightness with being commanded or willed by God. Two clear and appealing arguments for this theory turn on the idea that laws require a lawgiver, and the idea that God is sovereign or omnipotent. Critical examination of these arguments reveals some fundamental principles at odds with the Divine Command Theory, and yields some more penetrating versions of traditional objections to that theory.
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  11. Dale Tuggy (2004). Divine Deception, Identity, and Social Trinitarianism. Religious Studies 40 (3):269-287.
    After laying out the claims and motivations of Social Trinitarianism, I develop three new arguments against it. According to the first two, if Social Trinitarianism were true, the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit would have engaged in wrongful deception via both Old and New Testament revelation. I briefly consider the strength of the arguments and some possible replies to them, concluding that they constitute good reasons to deny that version of Trinitarian doctrine. According to the final argument, Social Trinitarianism is (...)
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  12. Dale Tuggy (2004). 12 Reid's Philosophy of Religion. In Terence Cuneo Rene van Woudenberg (ed.), The Cambridge Companion to Thomas Reid. Cambridge University Press. 289.
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  13. Dale Tuggy (2003). The Unfinished Business of Trinitarian Theorizing. Religious Studies 39 (2):165-183.
    In recent years, many resourceful thinkers have brought a new clarity to the issues surrounding the doctrine of the Trinity. Two incompatible families of Trinitarian doctrine have been clearly distinguished: Social Trinitarianism and Latin Trinitarianism. I argue here that no theory in either camp has yet evaded the triune pitfalls of inconsistency, unintelligibility, and poor fit with the Bible. These two main approaches appear to be hopeless, and I argue that appeals to ‘mystery’ are no way to avoid the difficulties (...)
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  14. Dale Tuggy (2000). Thomas Reid on Causation. Reid Studies 3:3-27.
     
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