Search results for 'Damage' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Anne Schwenkenbecher (2014). Collateral Damage and the Principle of Due Care. Journal of Military Ethics 13 (1):94-105.score: 24.0
    This article focuses on the ethical implications of so-called ‘collateral damage’. It develops a moral typology of collateral harm to innocents, which occurs as a side effect of military or quasi-military action. Distinguishing between accidental and incidental collateral damage, it introduces four categories of such damage: negligent, oblivious, knowing and reckless collateral damage. Objecting mainstream versions of the doctrine of double effect, the article argues that in order for any collateral damage to be morally permissible, (...)
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  2. Jolanta Zajančkauskienė (2011). Questions of Compensation for Damage, Caused by the Criminally Insane Person's Criminal Act (article in German). Jurisprudence 18 (3):1145-1161.score: 24.0
    The present article is aimed at dealing with certain questions of compensation for damage, caused by the criminally insane person. Disposal of a civil action on compensation for damage, caused by the criminally insane person, in the criminal procedure is analyzed in the first part of the article. The subjects, who are responsible for compensating for damage, caused by the criminally insane person’s deed, are dealt with in the second part. Not only the respective rules of law, (...)
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  3. F. M. Kamm (2005). Terror and Collateral Damage: Are They Permissible? [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 9 (3-4):381 - 401.score: 21.0
    This article begins by comparing terror and death and then focuses on whether killing combatants and noncombatants as a mere means to create terror, that is in turn a means to winning a war, is ever permissible. The role of intentions and alternative acts one might have done is examined in this regard. The second part of the article begins by criticizing a standard justification for causing collateral (side effect) deaths in war and offers an alternative justification that makes use (...)
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  4. Chrisoula Andreou (2006). Environmental Damage and the Puzzle of the Self-Torturer. Philosophy and Public Affairs 34 (1):95–108.score: 21.0
  5. Sophie Schwartz, Frédéric Assal, Nathalie Valenza, Mohamed L. Seghier & Patrik Vuilleumier (2005). Illusory Persistence of Touch After Right Parietal Damage: Neural Correlates of Tactile Awareness. Brain 128 (2):277-290.score: 21.0
  6. Deborah Giaschi, James E. Jan, Bruce Bjornson, Simon Au Young, Matthew Tata, Christopher J. Lyons, William V. Good & Peter K. H. Wong (2003). Conscious Visual Abilities in a Patient with Early Bilateral Occipital Damage. Developmental Medicine and Child Neurology 45 (11):772-781.score: 21.0
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  7. Richard D. Weiner (1984). Does Electroconvulsive Therapy Cause Brain Damage? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (1):1.score: 21.0
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  8. A. Bechara, A. R. Damasio, H. Damasio & S. W. Anderson (1993). Insensitivity to Future Consequences Following Damage to Human Prefrontal Cortex. Cognition 50 (1-3):7-15.score: 21.0
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  9. Thomas G. Hofmann, Carolina Glas & Nadja Bitomsky (2013). HIPK2: A Tumour Suppressor That Controls DNA Damage‐Induced Cell Fate and Cytokinesis. Bioessays 35 (1):55-64.score: 21.0
  10. Samer Mi Hussein, Judith Elbaz & Andras A. Nagy (2013). Genome Damage in Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Assessing the Mechanisms and Their Consequences. Bioessays 35 (3):152-162.score: 21.0
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  11. Tirin Moore, Hillary R. Rodman & Charles G. Gross (2001). Recovery of Visual Function Following Damage to the Striate Cortex in Monkeys. In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press. 35-51.score: 21.0
     
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  12. Björn Schumacher (2009). Transcription‐Blocking DNA Damage in Aging: A Mechanism for Hormesis. Bioessays 31 (12):1347-1356.score: 21.0
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  13. Peter Carruthers & Vincent Picciuto (2011). Should Damage to the Machinery for Social Perception Damage Perception. Cognitive Neuroscience 2 (2):116-17.score: 18.0
    We argue that Graziano and Kastner are mistaken to claim that neglect favors their self-directed social perception account of consciousness. For the latter should not predict that neglect would result from damage to mechanisms of social perception. Neglect is better explained in terms of damage to attentional mechanisms.
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  14. Jaak Panksepp, Thomas Fuchs, Victor Garcia & Adam Lesiak (2007). Does Any Aspect of Mind Survive Brain Damage That Typically Leads to a Persistent Vegetative State? Ethical Considerations. Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 2 (1):32-.score: 18.0
    Recent neuroscientific evidence brings into question the conclusion that all aspects of consciousness are gone in patients who have descended into a persistent vegetative state (PVS). Here we summarize the evidence from human brain imaging as well as neurological damage in animals and humans suggesting that some form of consciousness can survive brain damage that commonly causes PVS. We also raise the issue that neuroscientific evidence indicates that raw emotional feelings (primary-process affects) can exist without any cognitive awareness (...)
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  15. Adina Roskies (2006). Patients with Ventromedial Frontal Damage Have Moral Beliefs. Philosophical Psychology 19 (5):617 – 627.score: 18.0
    Michael Cholbi thinks that the claim that motive internalism (MI), the thesis that moral beliefs or judgments are intrinsically motivating, is the best explanation for why moral beliefs are usually accompanied by moral motivation. He contests arguments that patients with ventromedial (VM) frontal brain damage are counterexamples to MI by denying that they have moral beliefs. I argue that none of the arguments he offers to support this contention are viable. First, I argue that given Cholbi's own commitments, he (...)
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  16. A. Rebecca Reuber & Eileen Fischer (2010). Organizations Behaving Badly: When Are Discreditable Actions Likely to Damage Organizational Reputation? [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 93 (1):39 - 50.score: 18.0
    Everyday there are revelations of organizations behaving in discreditable ways. Sometimes these actions result in damage to an organization's reputation, but often they do not. In this article, we examine the question of why external stakeholders may overlook disclosed discreditable actions, even those entailing ethical breaches. Drawing on stigmatization theory, we develop a model to explain the likelihood of reputational loss following revelations of discreditable actions. The model integrates four properties of actions (perceived control, perceived certainty, perceived threat, and (...)
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  17. Michael Thomas & Annette Karmiloff-Smith (2002). Are Developmental Disorders Like Cases of Adult Brain Damage? Implications From Connectionist Modelling. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (6):727-750.score: 18.0
    It is often assumed that similar domain-specific behavioural impairments found in cases of adult brain damage and developmental disorders correspond to similar underlying causes, and can serve as convergent evidence for the modular structure of the normal adult cognitive system. We argue that this correspondence is contingent on an unsupported assumption that atypical development can produce selective deficits while the rest of the system develops normally (Residual Normality), and that this assumption tends to bias data collection in the field. (...)
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  18. Minako Ichikawa Smart & Shunzo Majima (2012). The Moral Grounds for Reparation for Collateral Damage in Expeditionary Interventions. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):181-195.score: 18.0
    Despite a significant effort to reduce civilian casualties, a large number of civilians have been killed and injured by the military forces of the Western powers undertaking military operations in remote regions. However, there is no requirement in the just war tradition (JWT) and international humanitarian law (IHL) to provide reparation for the victims of unintended and proportional attacks. This article seeks to establish moral grounds for responsibility to provide reparation for “collateral damage” by focusing on the distinct characteristics (...)
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  19. Paolo Bartolomeo (2012). The Elusive Nature of White Matter Damage in Anatomo-Clinical Correlations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:229-229.score: 18.0
    The Elusive Nature of White Matter Damage in Anatomo-Clinical Correlations.
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  20. M. Zimmermann (2012). Narrating Stroke: The Life-Writing and Fiction of Brain Damage. Medical Humanities 38 (2):73-77.score: 18.0
    Cerebro-vascular events are, after neurodegenerative disorders, the most frequent cause of brain damage that leads to the patient's impaired cognitive and/or bodily functioning. While the medico-scientific discourse related to stroke suggests that patients experience a change in identity and self-concept, the present analysis focuses on the patients' personal presentation of their experience to, first, highlight their way of thinking and feeling and, second, contribute to the clinician's actual understanding of the meaning of stroke within the life of each individual. (...)
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  21. C. A. Rentmeester (2008). Moral Damage to Health Care Professionals and Trainees: Legalism and Other Consequences for Patients and Colleagues. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (1):27-43.score: 18.0
    Health care professionals’ and trainees’ conceptions of their responsibilities to patients can change over time for a number of reasons: evolving career goals, desires to serve different patient populations, and changing family obligations, for example. Some changes in conceptions of responsibility are healthy, but others express moral damage. Clinicians’ changes in their conceptions of what they are responsible for express moral damage when their responses to others express a meager, rather than robust, sense of what they owe others. (...)
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  22. C. Tollefsen (2008). Intending Damage to Basic Goods. Christian Bioethics 14 (3):272-282.score: 18.0
    Richard McCormick justified his move to proportionalism in part because of the perceived inadequacy of the Grisez-Finnis approach to morality to answer the following question: “What is to count for turning against a basic good, and why?” In this paper, I provide the beginnings of an account of what it means to intend damage to a good; I then show that the account is readily exportable to judgments regarding killing and lying defended by Grisez and others. I then indicate (...)
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  23. J. Angelo Corlett (1996). Corporate Responsibility for Environmental Damage. Environmental Ethics 18 (2):195-207.score: 18.0
    I set forth and defend an analysis of corporate moral responsibility (retrospective moral liability), which, I argue, ought to serve as the foundation for corporate legal responsibility, punishment, and compensation for environmental damage caused by corporations.
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  24. Anders Rydvall, Niklas Juth, Mikael Sandlund, Magnus Domellöf & Niels Lynøe (forthcoming). To Treat or Not to Treat a Newborn Child with Severe Brain Damage? A Cross-Sectional Study of Physicians' and the General Population's Perceptions of Intentions. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy:1-8.score: 18.0
    Ethical dilemmas are common in the neonatal intensive care setting. The aim of the present study was to investigate the opinions of Swedish physicians and the general public on treatment decisions regarding a newborn with severe brain damage. We used a vignette-based questionnaire which was sent to a random sample of physicians (n = 628) and the general population (n = 585). Respondents were asked to provide answers as to whether it is acceptable to discontinue ventilator treatment, and when (...)
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  25. Dahlia W. Zaidel (1999). Neuronal Connectivity, Regional Differentiation, and Brain Damage in Humans. 22 (5):854-855.score: 18.0
    When circumscribed brain regions are damaged in humans, highly specific iimpairments in language, memory, problem solving, and cognition are observed. Neurosurgery such as "split brain" or hemispherectomy, for example has shown that encompassing regions, the left and right cerebral hemispheres each control human behavior in unique ways. Observations stretching over 100 years of patients with unilateral focal brain damage have revealed, withouth the theoretical benefits of "cognitive neuroscience" or "cognitive psychology," that human behavior is indeed controlled by the brain (...)
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  26. Stacy Burns (2001). “Think Your Blackest Thoughts and Darken Them:” Judicial Mediation of Large Money Damage Disputes. [REVIEW] Human Studies 24 (3):227-249.score: 18.0
    This paper considers a much neglected, but distinctive and increasingly prevalent kind of mediation work: the mediation of large money damage cases by acting and former judges. The research finds that judicial mediation is a law-infused procedure different from forms of mediation in which the stuff of law and lawyers'' work is only marginally relevant, if at all. The study details how judge-mediators draw on their knowledge of the law, technically and as a matter of professional practice, to make (...)
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  27. Neta Crawford (2013). Accountability for Killing: Moral Responsibility for Collateral Damage in America's Post-9/11 Wars. Oup Usa.score: 18.0
    A sophisticated and intellectually powerful analysis of culpability and moral responsibility in war, This book focuses on the causes of many episodes of foreseeable collateral damage. Trenchant, original, and ranging across security studies, international law, ethics, and international relations, Accountability for Killing will reshape our understanding of the ethics of contemporary war.
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  28. Chelsea Pietsch (2010). Is the Child Damage? Bioethics Research Notes 22 (4):54.score: 18.0
    Pietsch, Chelsea In a claim of negligence, plaintiffs must be able to prove that they have suffered some sort of damage or loss. Proving damage is usually a straightforward task which involves making a comparison between the plaintiff's position before and after the alleged negligence. However, what damage has been done if a doctor's negligence results in the conception and subsequent birth of a child? Is it ever possible to conceive of life as damage? These questions (...)
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  29. Rolf Verleger (2003). Double Dissociation in the Effects of Brain Damage on Working Memory. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):758-759.score: 18.0
    As revealed by standard neuropsychological testing, patients with damage either to the frontal lobe or to the hippocampus suffer from distinct impairments of working memory. It is unclear how Ruchkin et al.'s model integrates the role played by the hippocampus.
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  30. Simona Selelionytė-Drukteinienė (2010). The Multiple Debtors Case: the Extent of the Tortious Duty to Compensate Damage—Solidary or Proportional Liability? (text only in Lithuanian). Jurisprudence 121 (3):233-250.score: 18.0
    Among the most complicated issues in the law of delict, in the case of multiple debtors, is to determine the scope of each co-debtor’s liability. The rule of proportional liability clearly favours debtors more than the aggrieved party. And, on the contrary, the solidary liability best suits the interests of the aggrieved party as the risk of co-debtor’s insolvency is transferred to the debtors. Furthermore, in the latter case, the debtors who attempt to allocate the scope of their liability among (...)
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  31. and Neal J. Cohen David E. Warren, Melissa C. Duff, Daniel Tranel (2010). Medial Temporal Lobe Damage Impairs Representation of Simple Stimuli. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 18.0
    Medial temporal lobe damage in humans is typically thought to produce a circumscribed impairment in the acquisition of new enduring memories, but recent reports have documented deficits even in short-term maintenance. We examined possible maintenance deficits in a population of medial temporal lobe amnesics, with the goal of characterizing their impairments as either representational drift or outright loss of representation over time. Patients and healthy comparisons performed a visual search task in which the similarity of various lures to a (...)
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  32. Donald G. Stein & Marylou M. Glasier (1995). Are Fetal Brain Tissue Grafts Necessary for the Treatment of Brain Damage? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):86-107.score: 18.0
    Despite some clinical promise, using fetal transplants for degenerative and traumatic brain injury remains controversial and a number of issues need further attention. This response reexamines a number of questions. Issues addressed include: temporal factors relating to neural grafting, the role of behavioral experience in graft outcome, and the relationship of rebuilding of neural circuitry to functional recovery. Also discussed are organization and type of transplanted tissue, the of transplant viability, and whether transplants are really needed to obtain functional recovery (...)
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  33. Giuseppe di Pellegrino Giovanna Moretto, Manuela Sellitto (2013). Investment and Repayment in a Trust Game After Ventromedial Prefrontal Damage. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Although trust and reciprocity are ubiquitous in social exchange, their neurobiological substrate remains largely unknown. Here, we investigated the effect of damage to the ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) — a brain region critical for valuing social information — on individuals' decisions in a trust game and in a risk game. In the trust game, one player, the investor, is endowed with a sum of money, which she can keep or invest. The amount she decides to invest is tripled and (...)
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  34. Juozas Žilys (2011). The Referendum of 14 June 1992 “On Unconditional and Urgent Withdrawal of the Former Ussr Army from the Territory of the Republic of Lithuania and Restitution of Damage to Lithuania” in the Constitutional Genesis (article in Lithuanian). [REVIEW] Jurisprudence 18 (2):467-496.score: 18.0
    The paper aims at revealing the key legal and political factors that determined the organization and holding of the referendum on unconditional and urgent withdrawal of the former USSR army from the territory of the Republic of Lithuania and restitution of damage to Lithuania. It is established that the main factor was that the Supreme Council-Reconstituent Seimas of the Lithuanian Republic adopted provisions on the status of the occupation army and was constant in seeking to ensure the sovereignty of (...)
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  35. Dahlia W. Zaidel (2007). Overall Intelligence and Localized Brain Damage. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):173-174.score: 18.0
    Overall mean performance on intelligence tests by brain-damaged patients with focal lesions can be misleading in regard to localization of intelligence. The widely used WAIS has many subtests that together recruit spatially distant neural but individually the subtests reveal localized functions. Moreover, there are kinds of intelligence that defy the localizationist approach inferred from brain damage.
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  36. Esther Alonso Prieto, Stephanie Caharel, Richard N. Henson & Bruno Rossion (2011). Early (N170/M170) Face-Sensitivity Despite Right Lateral Occipital Brain Damage in Acquired Prosopagnosia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:138.score: 16.0
    Compared to objects, pictures of faces elicit a larger early electromagnetic response at occipito-temporal sites on the human scalp, with an onset of 130 ms and a peak at about 170 ms. This N170 face effect is larger in the right than the left hemisphere and has been associated with the early categorization of the stimulus as a face. Here we tested whether this effect can be observed in the absence of some of the visual areas showing a preferential response (...)
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  37. Giuseppe Vallar Nadia Bolognini, Debora Casanova, Angelo Maravita (2012). Bisecting Real and Fake Body Parts: Effects of Prism Adaptation After Right Brain Damage. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 16.0
    The representation of body parts holds a special status in the brain, due to their prototypical shape and the contribution of multisensory (visual and somatosensory-proprioceptive) information. In a previous study (Sposito et al., 2010), we showed that patients with left unilateral spatial neglect exhibit a rightward bias in setting the mid-point of their left forearm, which becomes larger when bisecting a cylindrical object comparable in size. This body part advantage, found also in control participants, suggests partly different processes for computing (...)
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  38. Christian Barry & Matt Peterson (2011). Who Should Pay for the Damage of the Global Financial Crisis? In Ned Dobos Christian Barry & Thomas Pogge (eds.), Global Financial Crisis:The Ethical Issues. Palgrave.score: 15.0
  39. Martha J. Farah & Todd E. Feinberg (1997). Consciousness of Perception After Brain Damage. Seminars in Neurology 17:145-52.score: 15.0
  40. Martha J. Farah (1994). Perception and Awareness After Brain Damage. Current Opinion in Neurobiology 4:252-55.score: 15.0
  41. Julian Savulescu (2009). Brain Damage and the Moral Significance of Consciousness. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (1):6-26.score: 15.0
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  42. Peter van Inwagen (2007). Impotence and Collateral Damage. Philosophical Topics 35 (1/2):67-82.score: 15.0
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  43. F. David Martin (1978). Sculpture, Painting, and Damage. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 37 (1):47-52.score: 15.0
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  44. Joanna J. Bryson (2010). Why Robot Nannies Probably Won't Do Much Psychological Damage. Interaction Studies 11 (2):196-200.score: 15.0
  45. Kathryn L. Ponder & Melissa Nothnagle (2010). Damage Control: Unintended Pregnancy in the United States Military. Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 38 (2):386-395.score: 15.0
    Women's access to reproductive health care is an ongoing source of conflict in U.S. politics; however, women in the military are often overlooked in these debates. Reproductive health care, including family planning, is a fundamental component of health care for women. Unintended pregnancy carries substantial health risks and financial costs, particularly for servicewomen. Compared with their civilian counterparts, women in the military experience greater challenges in preventing unwanted pregnancy and have less access to contraceptive services and abortion. Current military policies, (...)
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  46. Ramchandra Gandhi (1973). Injury, Harm, Damage, Pain, Etc. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 34 (2):266-269.score: 15.0
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  47. Annette C. Baier (2012). Hume's Damage Control. The Philosophers' Magazine 56 (56):87-89.score: 15.0
    We want to know about philosophers’ lives in part to see how they applied their philosophy to their own lives. Plato’s account of Socrates’ life, trial, and death sets a great example here, perhaps never equalled, just as few philosophers equal Socrates in integrity and courage.
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  48. S. Majerus, H. Gill-Thwaites, Kristin Andrews & Steven Laureys (2006). Behavioral Evaluation of Consciousness in Severe Brain Damage. In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.score: 15.0
  49. Catherine Malabou & Steven Miller, The New Wounded, From Neurosis to Brain Damage.score: 15.0
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