Search results for 'Damian Keil' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Damian Keil & Keith Davids (2000). Lifting the Screen on Neural Organization: Is Computational Functional Modeling Necessary? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (4):544-545.score: 240.0
    Arbib et al.'s comprehensive review of neural organization, over-relies on modernist concepts and restricts our understanding of brain and behavior. Reliance on terms like coding, transformation, and representation perpetuates a “black-box approach” to the study of the brain. Recognition is due to the authors for attempting to introduce postmodern concepts such as chaos and self-organization to the study of neural organization. However, confusion occurs in the implementation of “biologically rooted” schema theory in which schemas are viewed as computer programs. The (...)
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  2. Frank Keil, Derek E Lyons, Laurie R Santos and Frank C Keil.score: 120.0
    uniquely human ability. We are thus left with a fascinating question: if not imitation, what are mirror neurons for? Recent..
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  3. Frank Keil, Frank C. Keil, Ph.D.score: 120.0
    At the most general level I am interested in how we come to make sense of the world around us. Much of this research involves asking how intuitive explanations and understandings emerge in development and how they are related to notions of cause, mechanism and agency. These relations are linked to broader questions of what concepts are, how they change with development and increasing expertise and how they are structured in adults.
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  4. Frank Keil, Philosophical Psychology.score: 60.0
    To cite this Article: Keil, Frank C. (2008) 'Space—The Primal Frontier? Spatial Cognition and the Origins of Concepts', Philosophical Psychology, 21:2, 241 —.
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  5. Frank C. Keil & Robert A. Wilson (2000). The Shadows and Shallows of Explanation. In Frank C. Keil & Robert A. Wilson (eds.), Explanation and Cognition. MIT Press.. 137-159.score: 60.0
    Reprinted, with modification, from Wilson and Keil 1998.
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  6. John Sutton, Celia B. Harris, Paul G. Keil & Amanda J. Barnier (2010). The Psychology of Memory, Extended Cognition, and Socially Distributed Remembering. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (4):521-560.score: 30.0
    This paper introduces a new, expanded range of relevant cognitive psychological research on collaborative recall and social memory to the philosophical debate on extended and distributed cognition. We start by examining the case for extended cognition based on the complementarity of inner and outer resources, by which neural, bodily, social, and environmental resources with disparate but complementary properties are integrated into hybrid cognitive systems, transforming or augmenting the nature of remembering or decision-making. Adams and Aizawa, noting this distinctive complementarity argument, (...)
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  7. Geert Keil (2005). How the Ceteris Paribus Laws of Physics Lie. In Jan Faye, Paul Needham, Uwe Scheffler & Max Urchs (eds.), Nature’s Principles. Springer. 167--200.score: 30.0
    After a brief survey of the literature on ceteris paribus clauses and ceteris paribus laws (1), the problem of exceptions, which creates the need for cp laws, is discussed (2). It emerges that the so-called skeptical view of laws of nature does not apply to laws of any kind whatever. Only some laws of physics are plagued with exceptions, not the laws (3). Cp clauses promise a remedy, which has to be located among the further reactions to the skeptical view (...)
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  8. Patricia Smith Churchland, Rick Grush, Rob Wilson & Frank Keil, Computation and the Brain.score: 30.0
    Two very different insights motivate characterizing the brain as a computer. One depends on mathematical theory that defines computability in a highly abstract sense. Here the foundational idea is that of a Turing machine. Not an actual machine, the Turing machine is really a conceptual way of making the point that any well-defined function could be executed, step by step, according to simple 'if-you-are-in-state-P-and-have-input-Q-then-do-R' rules, given enough time (maybe infinite time) [see COMPUTATION]. Insofar as the brain is a device whose (...)
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  9. Charles M. H. Keil (1966). Motion and Feeling Through Music. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 24 (3):337-349.score: 30.0
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  10. Frank C. Keil & Robert A. Wilson (2000). The Concept Concept: The Wayward Path of Cognitive Science. Mind and Language 15 (2-3):308-318.score: 30.0
    Critical discussion of Jerry Fodor's Concepts: Where Cognitive Science Went Wrong (1998).
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  11. Paul Bloom & Frank C. Keil (2001). Thinking Through Language. Mind and Language 16 (4):351–367.score: 30.0
    What would it be like to have never learned English, but instead only to know Hopi, Mandarin Chinese, or American Sign Language? Would that change the way you think? Imagine entirely losing your language, as the result of stroke or trauma. You are aphasic, unable to speak or listen, read or write. What would your thoughts now be like? As the most extreme case, imagine having been raised without any language at all, as a wild child. What—if anything—would it be (...)
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  12. Geert Keil (2003). "Science Itself Teaches". A Fresh Look at Quine's Naturalistic Metaphilosophy. Grazer Philosophische Studien 66 (1):253-280.score: 30.0
    Quine famously holds that "philosophy is continuous with natural science". In order to find out what exactly the point of this claim is, I take up one of his preferred phrases and trace it through his writings, i.e., the phrase "Science itself teaches that …". Unlike Wittgenstein, Quine did not take much interest in determining what might be distinctive of philosophical investigations, or of the philosophical part of scientific investigations. I find this indifference regrettable, and I take a fresh look (...)
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  13. Robert A. Wilson & Frank C. Keil (1999). MIT Encyclopedia of the Cognitive Sciences. MIT Press.score: 30.0
  14. Geert Keil (2007). Naturgesetze, Handlungsvermögen und Anderskönnen. Deutsche Zeitschrift für Philosophie 55 (6):929-948.score: 30.0
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  15. Frank Keil, The Seductive Allure of Neuroscience Explanations.score: 30.0
    & Explanations of psychological phenomena seem to genervs. with neuroscience) design. Crucially, the neuroscience inate more public interest when they contain neuroscientific..
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  16. Robert A. Wilson & Frank C. Keil (1998). The Shadows and Shallows of Explanation. Minds and Machines 8 (1):137-159.score: 30.0
    We introduce two notions–the shadows and the shallows of explanation–in opening up explanation to broader, interdisciplinary investigation. The shadows of explanation refer to past philosophical efforts to provide either a conceptual analysis of explanation or in some other way to pinpoint the essence of explanation. The shallows of explanation refer to the phenomenon of having surprisingly limited everyday, individual cognitive abilities when it comes to explanation. Explanations are ubiquitous, but they typically are not accompanied by the depth that we might, (...)
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  17. Frank C. Keil & Robert A. Wilson (2000). Explanation and Cognition. MIT Press.score: 30.0
    These essays draw on work in the history and philosophy of science, the philosophy of mind and language, the development of concepts in children, conceptual...
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  18. Geert Keil (2001). How Do We Ever Get Up? On the Proximate Causation of Actions and Events. Grazer Philosophische Studien 61 (1):43-62.score: 30.0
    Many candidates have been tried out as proximate causes of actions: belief-desire pairs, volitions, motives, intentions, and other kinds of pro-attitudes. None of these mental states or events, however, seems to be able to do the trick, that is, to get things going. Each of them may occur without an appropriate action ensuing. After reviewing several attempts at closing the alleged “causal gap”, it is argued that on a correct analysis, there is no missing link waiting to be discovered. On (...)
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  19. Lynn Nadel, Lee Ryan, Katrina Keil & Karen Putnam (1999). Episodic Memory: It's About Time (and Space). Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):463-464.score: 30.0
    Aggleton & Brown rightly point out the shortcomings of the medial temporal lobe hypothesis as an approach to anterograde amnesia. Their broader perspective is a necessary corrective, and one hopes it will be taken very seriously. Although they correctly note the dangers of conflating recognition and recall, they themselves make a similar mistake in discussing familiarity; we suggest an alternative approach. We also discuss implications of their view for an analysis of retrograde amnesia. The notion that there are two routes (...)
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  20. Geert Keil (2013). Introduction: Vagueness and Ontology. [REVIEW] Metaphysica 14 (2):149-164.score: 30.0
    The article introduces a special issue of the journal Metaphysica on vagueness and ontology. The conventional view has it that all vagueness is semantic or representational. Russell, Dummett, Evans and Lewis, inter alia, have argued that the notion of “ontic” or “metaphysical” vagueness is not even intelligible. In recent years, a growing minority of philosophers have tried to make sense of the notion and have spelled it out in various ways. The article gives an overview and relates the idea of (...)
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  21. Frank C. Keil (2008). Space—the Primal Frontier? Spatial Cognition and the Origins of Concepts. Philosophical Psychology 21 (2):241 – 250.score: 30.0
    The more carefully we look, the more impressive the repertoire of infant concepts seems to be. Across a wide range of tasks, infants seem to be using concepts corresponding to surprisingly high-level and abstract categories and relations. It is tempting to try to explain these abilities in terms of a core capacity in spatial cognition that emerges very early in development and then gets extended beyond reasoning about direct spatial arrays and events. Although such a spatial cognitive capacity may indeed (...)
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  22. Frank Keil, Nurturing Nativism.score: 30.0
    empiricist approaches to knowledge acquisition. I say " appears" because so often the debaters seem to be talking past each other, arguing about different things or misunderstanding each other in such basic ways that the debates can seem to an observer as incoherent. For these reasons there has been a powerful need for a systematic treatment of the different senses of nativism and empiricism that considers both their historical contexts and their current manifestations. Cowie's book offers such a treatment, one (...)
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  23. George E. Newman & Frank C. Keil, Where's the Essence? Developmental Shifts in Children's Beliefs About Internal Features.score: 30.0
    The present studies investigated children’s and adults’ intuitive beliefs about the physical nature of essences. Adults and children (ranging in age from 6 to 10 years old) were asked to reason about two different ways of determining an unknown object’s category: taking a tiny internal sample from any part of the object (distributed view of essence), or taking a sample from one specific region (localized view of essence). Results from three studies indicated that adults strongly endorsed the distributed view, and (...)
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  24. Celia B. Harris, John Sutton, Paul Keil & Amanda Barnier, Collaborative Remembering: When Can Remembering With Others Be Beneficial?score: 30.0
    Experimental memory research has traditionally focused on the individual, and viewed social influence as a source of error or inhibition. However, in everyday life, remembering is often a social activity, and theories from philosophy and psychology predict benefits of shared remembering. In a series of studies, both experimental and more qualitative, we attempted to bridge this gap by examining the effects of collaboration on memory in a variety of situations and in a variety of groups. We discuss our results in (...)
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  25. Frank C. Keil, By Domains: The Origins of Concepts Of.score: 30.0
    domains as rareiied as a cardiologistRi7;s knowledge of arrhythmia to those as commonplace as everyday folk psychology. Domains can vary from the highly concrete causally rich relations in a naive mechanics of physical objects to the highly abstract noncausal relations of mathematics or natural language syntax. Lumping together all of these different sorts of domains so as to have similar effects on cognitive development is likely to be misleading and un· informative. In this chapter, I consider some distinctions and their (...)
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  26. Frank C. Keil (2008). How to Learn Multiple Tasks. Biological Theory 3 (1):30-41.score: 30.0
    The article examines the question of how learning multiple tasks interacts with neural architectures and the flow of information through those architectures. It approaches the question by using the idealization of an artificial neural network where it is possible to ask more precise questions about the effects of modular versus nonmodular architectures as well as the effects of sequential versus simultaneous learning of tasks. A prior work has demonstrated a clear advantage of modular architectures when the two tasks must be (...)
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  27. Frank C. Keil (2010). The Feasibility of Folk Science. Cognitive Science 34 (5):826-862.score: 30.0
    If folk science means individuals having well worked out mechanistic theories of the workings of the world, then it is not feasible. Laypeople’s explanatory understandings are remarkably coarse, full of gaps, and often full of inconsistencies. Even worse, most people overestimate their own understandings. Yet recent views suggest that formal scientists may not be so different. In spite of these limitations, science somehow works and its success offers hope for the feasibility of folk science as well. The success of science (...)
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  28. Frank C. Keil (1989). Spiders in the Web of Belief: The Tangled Relations Between Concepts and Theories. Mind and Language 4 (1-2):43-50.score: 30.0
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  29. Frank C. Keil (2001). Good Intentions and Bad Words. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1110-1111.score: 30.0
    Bloom makes a strong case that word meaning acquisition does not require a dedicated word learning system. This conclusion, however, does not argue against a dedicated language acquisition system for syntax, morphology, and aspects of semantics. Critical questions are raised as to why word meaning should be so different from other aspects of language in the course of acquisition.
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  30. Frank Keil, Getting to the Truth.score: 30.0
    One aspect of truth concerns knowing when to trust others when one’s own knowledge is inadequate. This is an ever more common problem in societies where technological and scientific change seems to be constantly accelerating. There is an increasing need to rely on the expertise of others and consequently to know when others are more likely to be offering an objective opinion as opposed to a biased one. Here, I argue that there are systematic and early emerging cognitive heuristics and (...)
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  31. Frank C. Keil, Structural Determinants of Interventions on Causal Systems.score: 30.0
    We investigate how people use causal knowledge to design interventions to affect the outcomes of causal systems. We propose that in addition to using content or mechanism knowledge to evaluate the effectiveness of interventions, people are also influenced by the abstract structural properties of a causal system. In particular, we investigated two factors that influence whether people tend to intervene proximally (on the immediate cause of an outcome of interest) or distally (on the root cause of a chain leading to (...)
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  32. Gary F. Marcus & Frank C. Keil (2008). Concepts, Correlations, and Some Challenges for Connectionist Cognition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (6):722-723.score: 30.0
    Rogers & McClelland's (R&M's) précis represents an important effort to address key issues in concepts and categorization, but few of the simulations deliver what is promised. We argue that the models are seriously underconstrained, importantly incomplete, and psychologically implausible; more broadly, R&M dwell too heavily on the apparent successes without comparable concern for limitations already noted in the literature.
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  33. Celia B. Harris, Paul Keil, John Sutton, Amanda Barnier & Doris McIlwain (2011). We Remember, We Forget: Collaborative Remembering in Older Couples. Discourse Processes 48 (4):267-303.score: 30.0
    Transactive memory theory describes the processes by which benefits for memory can occur when remembering is shared in dyads or groups. In contrast, cognitive psychology experiments demonstrate that social influences on memory disrupt and inhibit individual recall. However, most research in cognitive psychology has focused on groups of strangers recalling relatively meaningless stimuli. In the current study, we examined social influences on memory in groups with a shared history, who were recalling a range of stimuli, from word lists to personal, (...)
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  34. Roger Keil (ed.) (1998). Political Ecology: Global and Local. Routledge.score: 30.0
    This collection is drawn from a recent Global Political conference held to mark the centenary of the birth of Harold Innis, Canada's most important political economist. Throughout his life, Innis was concerned with topics which remain central to political ecology today, such as the link between culture and nature, the impact of humanity on the environment and the role of technology and communications. In this volume, the contributors address environmental issues which Innes was concerened with, from a contemporary, political economy (...)
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  35. Geert Keil (2005). Wahrheiten, die niemand kennen kann. Zu Wolfgang Künnes Verteidigung des alethischen Realismus. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 59 (3):404 - 415.score: 30.0
    Der Beitrag referiert und diskutiert die in Wolfgang Künnes Buch Conceptions of Truth entwickelte Wahrheitstheorie. Es handelt sich um eine realistische, also nichtepistemische, deflationistisch gefärbte Theorie mit Propositionen als Wahrheitswertträgern. Erörtert wird insbesondere der alethische Realismus dieser Theorie, genauer: die Auffassung, dass es Wahrheiten gibt, die niemals ein Mensch gerechtfertigt für wahr halten kann. Den nichtrealistischen Theorien, die Wahrsein an gerechtfertigtes Fürwahrhalten binden, hält Künne sein „Argument aus den blinden Flecken im Feld der Rechtfertigung“ entgegen, welches nicht die Möglichkeit nichtentdeckbaren (...)
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  36. M. Damian (2001). Congruity Effects Evoked by Subliminally Presented Primes: Automaticity Rather Than Semantic Processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27:154-165.score: 30.0
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  37. Geert Keil (2003). Über den Homunkulus-Fehlschluß. Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 57 (1):1 - 26.score: 30.0
    Ein Homunkulus im philosophischen Sprachgebrauch ist eine postulierte menschenähnliche Instanz, die ausdrücklich oder unausdrücklich zur Erklärung der Arbeitsweise des menschlichen Geistes herangezogen wird. Als Homunkulus-Fehlschluß wird die Praxis bezeichnet, Prädikate, die auf kognitive oder perzeptive Leistungen einer ganzen Person zutreffen, auch auf Teile von Personen oder auf subpersonale Vorgänge anzuwenden, was typischerweise zu einem Regreß führt. Der vorliegende Beitrag erörtert den Homunkulus-Fehlschluß zunächst in argumentationstheoretischer Hinsicht und stellt dabei ein Diagnoseschema auf. Dann werden zwei Anwendungsfelder erörtert: Instanzenmodelle der Psyche (Platon, (...)
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  38. Frank Keil (2008). Biases Towards Internal Features in Infants' Reasoning About Objects. Cognition 107 (2):420-432.score: 30.0
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  39. Frank Keil (1998). Two Dogmas of Conceptual Empiricism: Implications for Hybrid Models of the Structure of Knowledge. Cognition 65 (2-3):103-135.score: 30.0
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  40. Frank Keil, Conceptualizing a Nonnatural Entity: Anthropomorphism in God Concepts.score: 30.0
    We investigate the problem of how nonnatural entities are represented by examining university students’ concepts of God, both professed theological beliefs and concepts used in comprehension of narratives. In three story processing tasks, subjects often used an anthropomorphic God concept that is inconsistent with stated theological beliefs; and drastically distorted the narratives without any awareness of doing so. By heightening subjects’ awareness of their theological beliefs, we were able to manipulate the degree of anthropomorphization. This tendency to anthropomorphize may be (...)
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  41. Frank Keil (1998). The Most Basic Units of Thought Do More, and Less, Than Point. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (1):75-76.score: 30.0
    Thinking of concepts as explicit lists of features used to pick out referents neatly is indeed mistaken; but there are other alternatives than making concepts mere pointers. These alternatives are suggested by the difference between meaning X and having the concept X, problems of conceptual change, implicit conceptual schemata, the conceptual requirements of the division of cognitive labor, and how concepts figure in perception versus language.
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  42. Frank Keil (2003). Folkscience: Coarse Interpretations of a Complex Reality. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (8):368-373.score: 30.0
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  43. Geert Keil (2013). Substanzen als Ursachen? Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 67 (1):143-148.score: 30.0
    In his book Understanding Human Agency (OUP 2011), Erasmus Mayr defends the idea of agent causation against various objections. The article, which is a commentary on a précis of Mayr’s book, argues that his defence is unsuccessful on a number of counts. Mayr claims that even inanimate substances possess and exert active causal powers, but he fails to give an acceptable criterion that demarcates active from passive powers. Secondly, his approach does not answer Broads datability objection, according to which causes (...)
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  44. Jonathan F. Kominsky & Frank C. Keil (2014). Overestimation of Knowledge About Word Meanings: The “Misplaced Meaning” Effect. Cognitive Science 38 (5).score: 30.0
    Children and adults may not realize how much they depend on external sources in understanding word meanings. Four experiments investigated the existence and developmental course of a “Misplaced Meaning” (MM) effect, wherein children and adults overestimate their knowledge about the meanings of various words by underestimating how much they rely on outside sources to determine precise reference. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that children and adults show a highly consistent MM effect, and that it is stronger in young children. Study (...)
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  45. Frank C. Keil, 6 Constraints 0i1 the Acquisition And.score: 30.0
    y arguments about the intrinsically interactional nature of development (e.g. Johnston, 1988; Lehrman, 1953; Lemeri983O te learning takes place and an environment to be learned. The use of the term Cngnz`rii*e Psyc/10/0g_v.· An Inrerrzational Review. Edited by Michael W. Eysenck @1990 by John Wiley & Sons Ld..
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  46. Frank Keil, From Ugly Duckling to Swan? Japanese and American Beliefs About the Stability and Origins of Traits.score: 30.0
    Two studies compared the development of beliefs about the stability and origins of physical and psychological traits in Japan and the United States in three age groups: 5–6-year-olds, 8–10-year-olds, and college students. The youngest children in both cultures were the most optimistic about negative traits changing in a positive direction over development and being maintained over the aging period. The belief that individual differences in traits are inborn increased with age, and in all age groups, this belief was related to (...)
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  47. Frank Keil, The Hidden Structure of Overimitation.score: 30.0
    Edited by Susan E. Carey, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, and approved October 18, 2007 (received for review May 11, 2007).
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  48. Peter Damian, Selections From His Letter on Divine Omnipotence.score: 30.0
    Translated from the edition in Pierre Damien: Lettre sur la toute-puissance divine. Introduction, texte critique, traduction et notes, André Cantin, ed. & tr., (“Sources Chrétiennes,” vol. 191; Paris: Les Editions du Cerf, 1972.
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  49. Celia Harris, Amanda Barnier, John Sutton & Paul Keil (2010). How Did You Feel When the Crocodile Hunter Died?’: Voicing and Silencing in Conversation. Memory 18 (2):170-184.score: 30.0
    Conversations about the past can involve voicing and silencing; processes of validation and invalidation that shape recall. In this experiment we examined the products and processes of remembering a significant autobiographical event in conversation with others. Following the death of Australian celebrity Steve Irwin, in an adapted version of the collaborative recall paradigm, 69 participants described and rated their memories for hearing of his death. Participants then completed a free recall phase where they either discussed the event in groups of (...)
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