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Profile: Dan Arnold (University of Chicago)
  1. Dan Arnold (2012). The Deceptive Simplicity of Nāgārjuna's Arguments Against Motion: Another Look at Mūlamadhyamakakārikā Chapter 2. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 40 (5):553-591.
    This article – which includes a complete translation of Mūlamadhyamakakārikā chapter 2 together with Candrakīrti’s commentary thereon – argues that notwithstanding the many different and often arcane interpretations that have been offered of Nāgārjuna’s arguments against motion, there is really just one straightforward kind of argument on offer in this vexed chapter. It is further argued that this basic argument can be understood as a philosophically interesting one if it is kept in mind that the argument essentially has to do (...)
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  2. Daniel Anderson Arnold (2012). Brains, Buddhas, and Believing: The Problem of Intentionality in Classical Buddhist and Cognitive-Scientific Philosophy of Mind. Columbia University Press.
    Aiming to complicate this story, Dan Arnold confronts a significant obstacle to popular attempts at harmonizing classical Buddhist and modern scientific thought: since most Indian Buddhists believe that the mental continuum is uninterrupted ..
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  3. Dan Arnold (2010). Nāgārjuna's “Middle Way”: A non-eliminative understanding of selflessness. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 3:367-395.
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  4. Dan Arnold (2010). Self-Awareness ( Svasaṃvitti ) and Related Doctrines of Buddhists Following Dignāga: Philosophical Characterizations of Some of the Main Issues. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 38 (3):323-378.
    Framed as a consideration of the other contributions to the present volume of the Journal of Indian Philosophy , this essay attempts to scout and characterize several of the interrelated doctrines and issues that come into play in thinking philosophically about the doctrine of svasaṃvitti , particularly as that was elaborated by Dignāga and Dharmakīrti. Among the issues thus considered are the question of how mānasapratyakṣa (which is akin to manovijñāna ) might relate to svasaṃvitti ; how those related doctrines (...)
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  5. Daniel Arnold, Kumārila. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  6. Dan Arnold (2009). Dharmakırti and Dharmottara on the Intentionality of Perception: Selections From Nyayabindu (an Epitome of Philosophy). In Jay Garfield & William Edelgass (eds.), Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings. Oup Usa. 186--196.
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  7. Dan Arnold (2009). Svasamvitti as Methodological Solipsism: Narrow Content and the Problem of Intentionality in Buddhist Philosophy of Mind. In Mario D'Amato, Jay L. Garfield & Tom J. F. Tillemans (eds.), Pointing at the Moon: Buddhism, Logic, Analytic Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
     
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  8. Dan Arnold (2008). Buddhist Idealism, Epistemic and Otherwise: Thoughts on the Alternating Perspectives of Dharmakīrti. Sophia 47 (1):3-28.
    Some influential interpreters of Dharmakīrti have suggested understanding his thought in terms of a ‘sliding scale of analysis.’ Here it is argued that this emphasis on Dharmakīrti's alternating philosophical perspectives, though helpful in important respects, obscures the close connection between the two views in play (identified by later commentators as ‘Sautrāntika’ and ‘Yogācāra’). Indeed, with respect to these perspectives as Dharmakīrti develops them, the epistemology is the same either way. Insofar as that is right, John Dunne's characterization of Dharmakīrti's Yogācāra (...)
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  9. Dan Arnold (2008). Dharmakīrti's Dualism: Critical Reflections on a Buddhist Proof of Rebirth. Philosophy Compass 3 (5):1079-1096.
    Dharmakīrti, elaborating one of the Buddhist tradition's most complete defenses of rebirth, advanced some of this tradition's most explicitly formulated arguments for mind-body dualism. At the same time, Dharmakīrti himself may turn out to be vulnerable to some of the same kinds of arguments pressed against physicalists. It is revealing, then, that in arguing against physicalism himself, Dharmakīrti does not have available to him what some would judge to be more promising arguments for dualism (arguments, in particular, following Kant's 2nd (...)
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  10. Dan Arnold (2008). Review of Jonardon Ganeri, The Concealed Art of the Soul: Theories of Self and Practices of Truth in Indian Ethics and Epistemology. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2008 (4).
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  11. Dan Arnold (2008). Transcendental Arguments and Practical Reason in Indian Philosophy. Argumentation 22 (1):135-147.
    This paper examines some Indian philosophical arguments that are understandable as transcendental arguments—i.e., arguments whose conclusions cannot be denied without self-contradiction, insofar as the truth of the claim in question is a condition of the possibility even of any such denial. This raises the question of what kind of self-contradiction is involved—e.g., pragmatic self-contradiction, or the kind that goes with logical necessity. It is suggested that these arguments involve something like practical reason—indeed, that they just are arguments against the primacy (...)
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  12. Dan Arnold (2006). On Semantics and Saṃketa: Thoughts on a Neglected Problem with Buddhist Apoha Doctrine. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 34 (5):415-478.
    “...a theory of meaning for a particular language should be conceived by a philosopher as describing the practice of linguistic interchange by speakers of the language without taking it as already understood what it is to have a language at all: that is what, by imagining such a theory, we are trying to make explict." – Michael Dummer (2004: 31).
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  13. Dan Arnold (2005). Is Svasaṃvitti Transcendental? A Tentative Reconstruction Following Śāntarakṣita. Asian Philosophy 15 (1):77 – 111.
  14. Dan Arnold, Madhyamaka Buddhism. Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  15. Dan Arnold (2001). How to Do Things with Candrakirti: A Comparative Study in Anti-Skepticism. Philosophy East and West 51 (2):247-279.
    Two strikingly similar critiques of epistemological foundationalism are examined: J. L. Austin's critique of A. J. Ayer in the former's "Sense and Sensibilia," and part of Candrakīrti's critique of Dignāga in the first chapter of the "Prasannapadā." With respect to Austin, it is argued that his writings on epistemology in fact relate quite closely to his better-known philosophy of speech acts, and that the appeal to ordinary language is part of a transcendental argument against the possibility of radical skepticism. It (...)
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  16. Dan Arnold (2001). Intrinsic Validity Reconsidered: A Sympathetic Study of the MÄ«māMsaka Inversion of Buddhist Epistemology. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 29 (5/6):589-675.
  17. Daniel Arnold (2001). Of Intrinsic Validity: A Study on the Relevance of Purva Mimamsa. Philosophy East and West 51 (1):26-53.
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  18. Daniel Arnold (2001). Of Intrinsic Validity: A Study on the Relevance of Pūrva Mīmāṃsā. Philosophy East and West 51 (1):26 - 53.
    The Mīmāṃsāka doctrine of "svatah prāmānya" ("intrinsic validity") has seldom been given the serious philosophical attention it deserves. This doctrine in fact grows out of a sophisticated critique of epistemological foundationalism. This critique, as well as the larger project that it serves, has striking similarities with the philosophical project advanced in William Alston's "Perceiving God". A comparison of the two helps to highlight the strengths and the problems of both projects, and shows, perhaps more importantly, that the Mīmāṃsāka doctrine is (...)
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  19. Dan Arnold (2000). Bones, Stones, and Buddhist Monks: Collected Papers on the Archaeology, Epigraphy, and Texts of Monastic Buddhism in India (Review). Philosophy East and West 50 (4):620-623.
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  20. Dan Arnold (1999). The Fundamental Wisdom of the Middle Way: Naagaarjuna's Muulamadhyamakakaarikaa. Translation and Commentary by Jay L. Garfield. New York: Oxford University Press, 1995. Pp. Xix+ 372. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 49 (1):88-92.
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  21. Daniel Arnold (1998). Can Hartshorne Escape Dharmakīrti? Some Reflections with Implications for the Comparative Philosophy of Religion. American Journal of Theology and Philosophy 19 (1):3 - 33.
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  22. Daniel Arnold (1997). Much Ado About Nothing. Process Studies 26 (3/4):218-237.
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  23. Dana Arnold (ed.) (1994). The Picturesque in Late Georgian England: Papers Given at the Georgian Group Symposium, 22nd October 1994. The Group.
     
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