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  1. Shalini Perumpral, Dan Davidson & Nilanjin Sen (1999). Event Risk Covenants and Shareholder Wealth: Ethical Implications of the "Poison Put" Provision in Bonds. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 22 (2):119 - 132.
    This paper examines the ethical implications of "poison put" provisions included in bond offerings. A number of firms are using event-risk protections in bond offerings in an effort to attract investors back into the bond market. One of the most common event-risk protections is a "poison put" provision, which allows the bondholder to "put" the bond back to the firm at par or at a premium under certain specified conditions, such as a takeover effort or a downgrading of the bond (...)
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  2. Nancy L. Meade & Dan Davidson (1993). The Use of “Shark Repellents” to Prevent Corporate Takeovers: An Ethical Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 12 (2):83 - 92.
    Certain types of corporate charter antitakeover amendments, or shark repellents, may not serve the interests of the stockholders or the stakeholders of the firm. This paper extends the examination of the use of shark repellents by taking an ethical perspective to synthesize prior research on shark repellents and their relationship to stockholder and stakeholder welfare. Some shark repellents seem to benefit certain interest groups at the expense of other groups.
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  3. Khalil M. Torabzadeh, Dan Davidson & Hamid Assar (1989). The Effect of the Recent Insider-Trading Scandal on Stock Prices of Securities Firms. Journal of Business Ethics 8 (4):299 - 303.
    This paper addresses the impact of the unethical business conduct of a few individuals that shook the financial market in 1986. Specifically, in the study undertaken for this paper, the wealth status of the shareholders of securities firms was examined in relation to the public disclosure of the insider-trading scandals involving Dennis Levine, Ivan Boesky, and their confederates. It was hypothesized that the expected market-adjusted stock returns for the securities firms would be negative as a result of the scandals. The (...)
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  4. Dan Davidson (1988). Employee Testing: An Ethical Perspective. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 7 (3):211 - 217.
    This paper deals with the conflict between the desire of an employer to test employees for honesty and chemical dependency, and the right of the employee to privacy. Not only is the physical privacy of the employee infringed upon, but the psychic privacy of the individual as well. It is the conclusion of the paper that such an invasion of privacy is not justified without serious and compelling reason, and not the mere chance that testing will reveal problems among some (...)
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